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How to get an NHS Pension Refund

By Gabrielle Richardson
July 17, 2019

What is the NHS Pension Scheme? When you start working within the NHS, you will automatically be included in the NHS Pension Scheme. It is important to note that you can choose to opt-out of the Scheme, if you would prefer. In this blog post, we share how much of a pension contribution to expect and how to claim a refund if you decide that you do not want to be enrolled within the MTI Scheme. How much do I contribute to my NHS Pension? You will pay a percentage of your gross salary into your pension each month. This is then topped up by your employer contributions (listed below) and you will also receive pension tax relief on your contributions. Salary Range Contribution Rate £26,824-£47,845 12.5% £47,846-£70,630 12.5% £70,631-£111,376 13.5% £111,377+ 14.5% When will I receive my NHS Pension? You will receive your pension at the “normal pension age”. You can retire early and claim your pension once you reach the minimum pension age (55). However, your pension benefits will be reduced, to reflect the fact your pension will pay out for longer. The “normal pension” age varies depending on what section of the scheme you are in: 1995 section: 60 years of age 2008 section: 65 years of age 2015 section: state pension age (65 for men and 64 for women) What if I have made contributions into my pension but decide I do not want to pay anymore? If you want to obtain the money you have paid into your pension, you may be eligible for a refund. To qualify, you must: Have no continuing membership upon reaching the Normal Pension Age Have ceased membership of the Scheme in all employments Have less than two years qualifying membership in the NHS Pension Scheme Have not had a transfer into the NHS Pension Scheme from a personal, money purchase or stakeholder pension If you have re-entered pensionable NHS employment after a break of 12 months or more, you may be entitled to a refund of your earlier contributions. You do not qualify for a refund if: You have two years or more qualifying membership You have reached Normal Pension Age during this period of membership for which a refund is being requested How do I apply for an NHS Pension Refund? If you believe that you qualify for an NHS Pension Refund, you will need to complete the application form, labelled refund of a pension contributions (RF12). Please click here to download the form. You will need to complete Part 1 and then give Part 2 to your HR department to fill out. How long will it take until I obtain my refund? After your request has been processed and approved, the payment can take 5-10 working days until after that letter. Please note, the refund will be less than the pension contributions you have made. This is because, by law, your hospital will have to make two deductions. One is to cover the cost of you reinstating in the State Second Pension Scheme and the second in respect of income tax. Can I rejoin the Scheme after I have had a refund? Yes, you can rejoin the NHS Pension Scheme after a 24-hour break.   Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor who wants to relocate to the UK and join the NHS, email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you on your journey to the UK. Are you a member of our Facebook Group IMG Advisor? By joining IMG Advisor, you will have access to frequent relocation blog posts, the opportunity to ask questions and receive professional advice and the chance to meet other IMGs. References Davies, P. (2019). NHS pension schemes explained. [online] Which? Money. Available at: https://www.which.co.uk/money/pensions-and-retirement/company-pensions/public-sector-pensions-explained/nhs-pension-schemes-explained-azydt0q5t434 [Accessed 17 Jul. 2019]. Nhsbsa.nhs.uk. (2019). [online] Available at: https://www.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/sites/default/files/2017-03/Members%20Refunds%20Factsheet%20V5%2002.2017.pdf [Accessed 17 Jul. 2019].

Q&A with Dr Alex Vallakalil, NHS Trust Grade Doctor Psychiatry

By Gabrielle Richardson
July 08, 2019

Introduction 1. What is your name, speciality, grade and what hospital do you work at? I am Dr. Itticheria Alex Vallakalil (better known as Alex). I work as a Trust Grade Doctor in Psychiatry with Aneurin Bevan University Health Board; Newport. I am starting my Core Training in Psychiatry with Oxford Health NHS Trust under the Department of Psychiatry; University of Oxford; Thames Valley Deanery this August. 2. What country did you relocate from? India 3. Would you share with us your personal mission as a doctor? I would do my best to offer comprehensive treatment and consultation to our patients, their families, and the community. I would also like to apply my knowledge to the development and delivery of more effective, evidence-based treatments. 4. At what point in your career did you decide you wanted to relocate to the UK? What were your motivations for wanting to do so? I decided to relocate to the UK six months after my Internship in India. I decided to relocate when I got feedback that the Psychiatry Training in the U.K is far more disciplined than how it is in my home country healthcare system is. The Relocation Process 5. What pathway did you choose to obtain GMC Registration? PLAB Examinations. 6. How was your experience of securing an NHS post? I did a clinical attachment in Psychiatry with the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust for a period of 2 months directly after my PLAB part 2 examinations. This increased my chances of receiving more interview invitations. I attended most of the interviews in person and received offers for the posts. 7. How long did it take you to relocate? It took me twelve months to relocate to the UK. I did not have any specific difficulties relocating to the UK as my job was on the shortage occupation list. 8. Is there anything you would have liked to have known before deciding to relocate? And now once you live in the UK? I wish I had known about the sudden changes in weather (laugh. Ol) Thoughts on the UK 9. For you, what are the key benefits of living in the UK? The work culture in the U.K offers a good work-life balance. I am very much impressed by the advanced technologies that exists here. There is a lot to explore in the country side for short get-aways and there are opportunities to travel all around Europe easily whilst in the U.K 10. How do you feel you settled in your chosen location within the UK? I reckon; Wales is a very good place to start the first NHS job. I live in Abergavenny; which is one of the best places to live in Wales. The people here are very friendly and there are lot of things going on. I love Wales for its serenity and its similarity to where I am from (Kerala; India -“Gods Own Country”) The NHS 11. How would you describe the support you received from your hospital after starting your new position? I feel very well supported even as a Non-Trainee Doctor. I had a lot of time to work on my portfolio during my Trust Grade job. I also have weekly supervision sessions with my Consultant. My Mentor Dr. Raja Adnan Ahmed and my Educational supervisor (RCPsych Tutor) Dr.Ranjini Rao was too kind; helping me to settle in and also secure a core training post .My Consultant Dr. Rahim Safeer also helped me have an understanding of Audits and the abilities to work in a multidisciplinary team. The work colleagues were also very friendly and professional. 12. What is your opinion on the NHS? Working within it and as a patient receiving care? I would see NHS as a “Mother” to the patients receiving care and also for all its wonderful staff. Yes; the NHS has always been caring, kind, supportive, empathetic and straight forward. 13. How do you find working in the UK compared to your home country? I feel that there are lot more opportunities to develop in one’s own career in the U.K compared to my home country (especially in Psychiatry). I have always loved working in my home country; but I could not really devote a lot of time for my personal development and lateral interests amidst the busy shifts. Training within the NHS 14. How long did it take you to secure a training post? It took me four months to obtain a training post.  15. Do you have any advice for other IMGs who want to secure a training post? There are opportunities to apply into Psychiatry Training without any U.K work experience if your Alternate Form of Foundation competencies are signed off from your home country. I took time off to understand the system without applying directly. This has definitely given me an upper hand in securing a rotation of my personal choice and also good experience within Psychiatry. It is not necessary that the candidate have prior psychiatry experience before applying; but a strong interest and realistic insight into psychiatry and mental health is very essential. Psychiatry 16. Why did you choose to specialise in Psychiatry? Mental Health I believe is important as physical health and definitely more thought stimulating. Psychiatry allows me to work on a bio-psycho-social model to do the best for my patients; which is very creative most of the times.  I am curious about every individual and I like interacting with patients as a whole; making them the centre of our conversation. I understand there is a lot of social stigma around Psychiatry and mentally ill patients; which I completely disprove of and I am hoping to make a difference. There are also lot of untouched areas in Psychiatry; which improves the potential for research opportunities 17. Do you have any advice for junior doctors who want to pursue a career in Psychiatry? If you are always curious, ready to explore what you don’t know and happy to see people beyond face value; Psychiatry is for you. The Future 18. What are your hopes and plans for the future? I am looking forward to complete my Core Training and then apply for my Speciality Training on Child and Adolescent Mental Health. I would also like to contribute towards Psychiatry on a Public Health perspective. Thank you for taking the time to participate in this interview Dr Vallakalil, we wish you all the best with your new training post. Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor who needs support securing an NHS post, email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you on your journey to the UK. Are you a member of our Facebook Group IMG Advisor? We publish regular blog posts to aid your relocation, you will receive professional support and get the chance to meet other IMGs.    

How to apply for an Enhanced DBS check

By Gabrielle Richardson
July 05, 2019

Before you can start your NHS post, it is a UK legal requirement for you to undertake a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check. It is important to note that you can only complete your enhanced DBS check once you are in the UK as you need a UK address. You should also ensure the check is “enhanced”. What is an Enhanced DBS check? An enhanced DBS check is a check on your criminal convictions and cautions record. The check is required for job roles that involve caring for children and vulnerable adults. An enhanced DBS includes details of all convictions on record, whether they are spent or unspent under the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 (ROA). The Enhanced DBS Disclosures involves an extra level of checking with your local police force records in additional with the Police National Computer. What documentation do I need to apply for my enhanced DBS check? You will apply for your check online. To apply, you will need the below documentation: A valid passport or driving license with evidence of your date of birth National Insurance number Two of the following documents; a utility bill, bank, mortgage or credit card statement with your full home address How much does an Enhanced DBS check cost? The average cost is £44 excluding processing and VAT fees, each website will have different fees. How long does an Enhanced DBS check take? It usually takes up to 14 days for you to receive your certificate. How do I apply for a DBS check? When you first arrive in the UK, the HR will ask you to attend a “HR appointment” where you will fill out employment forms and receive your rota. They will also provide you with the exact online link of which to apply for your DBS check, as each Trust uses a different website. Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor who needs support securing an NHS post, email your CV to [email protected] and we can aid you in the relocation process, finding accommodation and schools for your children. Join our Facebook Group Are you a member of IMG Advisor? We publish regular relocation blog posts on relocating to the UK and joining the NHS. You can also receive professional guidance and get the chance to meet other IMGs.

Switching from a Tier 5 visa to a Tier 2 visa

By Gabrielle Richardson
July 04, 2019

The MTI Scheme If you are accepted onto the MTI Scheme, you will need to apply for a Tier 5 visa that will allow you to undertake a training placement in a UK hospital for a maximum time of two years. The MTI Scheme allows international doctors to receive world class training and gain non-clinical skills such as medical education and leadership. If you obtain an NHS training post via the MTI Scheme, you will receive full GMC Registration. Therefore, when you finish your post you will be eligible to apply for a fixed-term post. However, at the end of your post you will need to leave the UK, apply for a fixed-term post from overseas and then you will need to switch your visa from Tier 5 to a Tier 2 visa. How do I obtain a Tier 2 visa? After you have left the UK and successfully obtained a fixed-term NHS post, you will need to apply for a Tier 2 (General) visa. Once you have met the hospital’s pre-employment checks and submitted the right documentation, they will apply for your Certificate of Sponsorship. Once this has been successfully issued to you, you can begin applying for your Tier 2 visa. What documents do I need to apply for my Tier 2 visa? A valid Certificate of Sponsorship. Please note, you have three months from the date it is issued to apply for your Tier 2 visa Tuberculosis Test Clearance Certificate. If your country is listed here. Police Clearance Certificate. You will need a certificate from any country you have stayed in for a total of 12 months or more over the last 10 years. Please note, this is also needed for any Tier 2 dependents over the age of 18. Proof of English Knowledge – This can either be a score of 4in IELTS UKVI or your UKNARIC certificate Maintenance – If your hospital has not ticked “Y” on the Maintenance box on your CoS, you will need to evidence that you have £945 in your account for the last 90 days prior to your application. Please note, your dependents will also need £630 in their personal account for the same period of time. Can I stay in the UK whilst I switch from a Tier 5 visa to a Tier 2 visa? No, this is illegal. It is important that at the end of your Tier 5 visa, you leave the UK and return back to your home country. You can then apply for your Tier 2 visa. What are the Tier 2 (General) visa conditions? After you have successfully received your Tier 2 visa, you will be able to: Work the job described in your CoS, for your Tier 2 sponsor (The NHS hospital who has employed you) Work 20 locum hours a week Work unlimited bank shifts a week Unlimited voluntary work Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor who needs support securing an NHS post, email your CV to [email protected] and we can aid you in the relocation process, finding accommodation and schools for your children. Join our Facebook Group Are you a member of IMG Advisor? We publish regular relocation blog posts on relocating to the UK and joining the NHS. You can also receive professional guidance and get the chance to meet other IMGs.

How to secure temporary accommodation in the UK

By Gabrielle Richardson
July 01, 2019

How to secure accommodation in the UK Before you arrive in the UK, it is important for you to have accommodation organised for yourself and your family. So, when you step off the plane your journey and plans are stress free. Unfortunately, it is a legal requirement for you to rent/sign for a property in person. Therefore, you have three short-term accommodation options available to you before you can book long-term accommodation. Option 1: Stay at hospital accommodation NHS hospital accommodation for doctors can be extremely limited. So, when you sign your offer letter and you are interested in temporarily staying in hospital accommodation – it is important for you to enquire about whether there is any availability. Depending on the hospital’s availability, you may have to fill out an accommodation request form and accommodation will be successfully allocated. However, if all of the hospital accommodation is full, you may need to join a waiting list and wait until an occupancy becomes available. In our experience, hospital accommodation large enough for a family is rare, so, you may need to consider the below two options if you are travelling with a spouse and children. That being said, if you are successful in securing hospital accommodation, you can expect a furnished room with a wash hand basin and then you will usually share the bathroom/shower and kitchen facilities. How do I pay for it? The majority of NHS Trusts will deduct your rent for the property from your monthly salary. Option 2: Air BnB Air BnB is an online marketplace that lets people rent out their property or spare room guests. The website allows you to book a single room to an entire house. The website/app will provide you with lots of photos of the property with a full map listing. Booking a room/property via Air BnB will provide you with great value for your money. The website allows you to compare a range of properties at a range of price points from a few pounds a night to hundreds, depending on your requirements and location. How do I use Air BnB? Go to airbnb,com or install the app on your smart phone. Enter your destination, dates, number of guests, select whether you want to book an entire home, private room or shared room. Select your filters to match your criteria, for example, wifi, kitchen, bathroom, pool etc. Click search. Once you have found a property that meets your requirements within your price range click “Contact Host” to ask a question about the property or “Request to Book” to begin the booking process. The host will need to approve your request before your booking has gone through. Tips for booking an Air BnB Start your search and book as early as possible as this will provide you the most options when it comes to selecting a property. Pay attention to the location. Put the property’s street into Google maps from your hospital – so, you know exactly how long it will take you to travel to work until you find something more permanent. Read attention to the fine print and cancellation policy. Contact the host with information on the local area. More than likely they will be happy to help you with information on local grocery stores, public transport etc. Option 3: Book a hotel If you cannot find an Air BnB to meet your needs, you may need to consider booking a hotel for your first week in the UK. There are various comparison websites to aid you in booking a hotel in the UK. These include, but are not limited to: Booking.com Trivago Expedia Late Rooms The advantage of booking a hotel for your initial stay, is that the booking process is flexible. Often, you can book a hotel room with free cancellation and pay on arrival, giving you additional flexibility. Furthermore, if you are travelling with your family, then you can book a hotel room with enough space for all of you. However, the disadvantage of booking a hotel room is that is can be costly for a long duration of time. Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor who needs support relocating to the UK and joining the NHS, please email your CV to [email protected] and we can aid you in securing your first NHS post. IMG Advisor Are you a member of our Facebook Group IMG Advisor? We publish regular blog posts on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS. You can receive professional guidance from us and get the chance to meet other IMGs.    

UKNARIC & How to Apply

By Gabrielle Richardson
June 24, 2019

UKNARIC UKNARIC is a UK agency for the recognition and comparison of international qualifications and skills. It performs this official function on behalf of the UK Government. The agency provides The Statement of Comparability to confirm that your overseas qualifications compare to the UK system by comparing them to qualification framework levels and qualification types. Why will I need to use UKNARIC? When it comes to applying for your Tier 2 visa, you have two options available to you: IELTS UKVI – With a score of 4 UKNARIC Certificate – If your primary medical degree was taught in English, you can use UKNARIC as a route to evidencing your English language skills Please note, you cannot use UKNARIC as a pathway to evidencing your English language skills if your primary medical degree was NOT taught in English. What is the process? Step 1: Visit the UKNARIC website: https://www.naric.org.uk/naric/ Step 2: Choose the red route: Visas and Nationality Service Step 3: Open an online account and upload the following documentation: A scan of your primary medical certificate A scan of your academic transcripts A scan of a Medium of Instruction letter which confirms that your qualification was taught and assessed completely in English A scan of translations of your documents, if not issued in English originally Step 4: Make your payment How much does it cost to use UKNARIC? Standard Service £125 (outside of the EU) 24-hour Fast Track Service £289 48-hour Fast Track Service £239 How long does the standard service take? Typically, it will take 10 working days for your certificate to be processed. Delivery At the end of the application process, UKNARIC will ask you how you would like your certificate to be sent to you. The options for international delivery are stated below: DHL Courier Service £80 1-6 working days International Signed For £8.50 7 working days Standard Airmail £4 3-7 working days How long is my UKNARIC Certificate valid for? The UKNARIC certificate is valid for a lifetime. Therefore, once you have paid and obtained your certificate, you will not need to pay for another one - unless you lose it. Relocation Support If you are an international doctor who wants to support relocating to the UK and securing your first NHS post, email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you on your journey to the UK. IMG Advisor Are you a member of our Facebook Group IMG Advisor? We publish regular blog posts on how to successfully relocate to the UK and join the NHS. You can also receive professional guidance and support and get the chance to meet other IMGs. References Naric.org.uk. (2019). NARIC - VisasAndNationality - Further Information. ] Available at: https://www.naric.org.uk/visas%20and%20nationality/Further-information.aspx [Accessed 24 Jun. 2019]. Naric.org.uk. (2019). NARIC - Visas and Nationality. ] Available at: https://www.naric.org.uk/visas%20and%20nationality/How%20to%20Apply.aspx [Accessed 24 Jun. 2019].    

Overview of MRCOG

By Gabrielle Richardson
June 19, 2019

To work at ST3+ level within Obstetrics and Gynaecology, you will need to obtain MRCOG. MRCOG is an internationally respected gold standard qualification. The exam is a three-part assessment, the first two exams are written, and the third exam is an Objective Structured Clinical Examination. After you obtain MRCOG, you will also need a pass in IELTS or OET to evidence your English language skills. Holding MRCOG and a pass in IELTS or OET will make you eligible for GMC Registration and thus the ability to apply for NHS posts. Examination Fees MRCOG Part 1 UK and The Republic of Ireland - £460 Band A - £464 Band B - £427 Band C - £380 MRCOG Part 2 UK and The Republic of Ireland - £460 Band A - £464 Band B - £427 Band C - £380 MRCOG Part 3 UK and The Republic of Ireland - £455 Band A - £589 Band B - £550 Band C - £550 Banding applies to the centre in which you are taking your exam, click here to find out which band your country falls under. What will the MRCOG exams test me on? Clinical skills, information technology, clinical governance and research, core surgical skills, postoperative care, surgical procedures, antenatal care, maternal medicine, management of labour, management of delivery, postpartum problems, gynaecological problems, subfertility, sexual and reproductive health, early pregnancy care, gynaecological oncology, urogynaecology and pelvic floor problems. Please click here for the full blue print. MRCOG Part 1 Examination Format This exam consists off two written papers, each consisting of 100 single-best-answer questions. Each paper has the same value. However, there is no minimum score required for each paper, the outcome is determined only by a candidate’s overall (combined) mark. Paper 1 – 2 hours 30 minutes in duration and there are 100 single-best-answer questions Paper 2 – 2 hours 30 minutes in duration and there are 100 single-best-answer MRCOG Part 2 Examination Format To sit MRCOG Part 2, you must have passed MRCOG Part 1. There are two written papers and each paper counts for the same amount of marks. Paper 1 – 3 hours in duration and you will have to answer 50 single-best-answer questions and 50 extended-matching questions. The Royal College recommends that you spend 70 minutes on the single-best answer questions and 110 minutes on the extended-matching questions. Paper 2 – 3 hours in duration and you will have to answer 50 single-best-answer questions and 50 extended-matching questions. The Royal College recommends that you spend 70 minutes on the single-best answer questions and 110 minutes on the extended-matching questions. MRCOG Part 3 Examination Format You will be eligible to sit MRCOG Part 3 after you have successfully passed MRCOG Part 1 &2. The purpose of MRCOG Part 3 is a clinical assessment of knowledge, skills, attitudes and competencies. The clinical assessment consists of 14 tasks in a circuit, each task is based on one of the 14 modules detailed on the syllabus (mentioned above). Each of the modules is assessed against 5 criteria: Patient safety Communication with patients and their relatives Communication with colleagues Information gathering Applied clinical knowledge Each task will assess your clinical practice, patient communication, clinical knowledge or communicating with colleagues involving all aspects of patient safety. Each task is 12 minutes in length, which includes 2 minutes of initial reading time. What types of tasks are there within MRCOG Part 3? Simulated patient/colleague tasks – You will interact with an actor who has been trained and fully briefed in the role they are there to play. The actor will know all of the relevant details pertaining to the case and they will have some scripted questions to prompt if needed. Structured discussion task – You will interact directly with a clinical examiner who will ask you a detailed list of questions regarding the task at hand. Please note, you be also be required to write during any of the tasks. Useful Revision Resources Books Revision Notes for MRCOG Part 1 Part 2 MRCOG: 500 EMQs and SBA Tasks for MRCOG Clinical Assessment Part 3 MRCOG, Your Essential Revision Guide Question Banks Pass MRCOG Ace Online MCQ’s for MRCOG Part 1 MCQ’s for MRCOG Part 2 Practice Papers MRCOG Part 1 MRCOG Part 2 - Obstetrics MRCOG Part 3 – Gynaecology MRCOG Part 3 Clinical Scenarios Relocation to the UK Are you an international doctor who plans to relocate to the UK and join the NHS? Send your CV to [email protected] and we will be happy to guide and support you on your journey to the UK. From securing an NHS post to assisting you with finding schools for your children. IMG Advisor Are you a member of our Facebook Group, IMG Advisor? We publish regular blog posts, you can receive professional guidance and support and get the chance to meet other IMGs. References Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists. (2019). Part 1 MRCOG exam. [online] Available at: https://www.rcog.org.uk/en/careers-training/mrcog-exams/part-1-mrcog/ [Accessed 19 Jun. 2019].​ Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists. (2019). Part 2 MRCOG exam. [online] Available at: https://www.rcog.org.uk/en/careers-training/mrcog-exams/part-2-mrcog/ [Accessed 19 Jun. 2019]. Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists. (2019). Part 3 MRCOG exam. [online] Available at: https://www.rcog.org.uk/en/careers-training/mrcog-exams/part-3-mrcog-exam/ [Accessed 19 Jun. 2019].  

Revalidation

By Gabrielle Richardson
June 18, 2019

Revalidation What is revalidation? Revalidation is the process for doctors to positively affirm to the GMC that they are up to date and fit to practice. It is important to make sure that every doctor is up to date with medical advancements and their performance is being monitored by the medical licensing authority - this is to assist with continuing professional development and maintain patient safety. Revalidation runs over a five-year cycle and you will only need to revalidate once in the cycle. Please note, this blog post is merely a guide. Please click here for a full list of what is expected from you as an international doctor. What does the process look like? Everyone who holds a GMC license to practice is subject to revalidation and each organisation employing doctors in the UK is obliged to offer resources and support to ensure the process can be successfully navigated by their employees – organisations (both NHS and private) who provide this support are known as a ‘Designated Body’. Please bear in mind that it is ultimately the responsibility of each individual doctor to fulfil his/her obligations and maintain their license to practice medicine in the UK by completing each cycle of Revalidation, not the Designated Body. Revalidation itself is completed via a local evaluation of each doctors’ practice by a ‘Responsible Officer’ in every revalidation cycle – each Designated Body must have a Responsible Officer (usually the hospital Medical Director) who is charged with reviewing the evidence gathered during each cycle and deciding on behalf of the GMC whether the expected standards of medical practice in the UK are being met. This evidence includes annual appraisals, personal development plan’s (PDP’s), 360 feedback, self-evaluation, research, attendance at conferences and much more – all showing steps towards continual professional development. The Responsible Officer will make a recommendation about your fitness to practice to the GMC via GMC Connect. The Responsible Officer’s recommendation will be based on previously mentioned evidence over the course of the five-year cycle, combined with information drawn from the hospital’s (Designated Body’s) clinical governance systems. After the Responsible Officer’s recommendation, the GMC will decide whether to renew, request further information, suspend or revoke your license to practice. What do I need to do? Step 1: Open your GMC online account and make sure that you have a “connection” to a Designated Body and the Responsible Officer for that body is correct. This is so that the GMC knows who is taking responsibility for supporting you with the revalidation of your license. Step 2: You will then need to understand and collate the different types of information and documentation needed to reflect upon for your appraisal. This can include, but is not limited to: Evidence of your Continuing Professional Development – for example, journal club, job rotation, audit and reflective practice and teaching Quality improvement activity Significant events Feedback from patients Feedback from colleagues Compliments and complaints  Your employment or practice history Evidence of your Good Standing Certificates Fitness to Practice and health declarations Details of your annual appraisals, to show your continuing engagement with revalidation Step 3: Have an annual appraisal. An annual appraisal is a key part of revalidation. The appraisal should be supportive and developmental, but it is not a pass or fail exercise. An appraisal is an opportunity for a chance for reflection over your professional practice over the last year. Although your appraiser can facilitate further reflection, it is your responsibility to demonstrate examples of your reflective practice. During your appraisal, you must discuss the changes you have made or plan to make and any areas of good practice you intend to maintain or build on as a result of your reflection. Please note, you will need to collect evidencing documentation that covers your practice. Is there any guidance on the information I need to evidence? Please click here for access to the NHS Toolkit. The toolkit is designed with the appraisal meeting in mind, it allows you to enter information in a logical manner that mirrors how the appraisal conversation may flow. What does it cost to revalidate? If you have a Designated Body, then the GMC will not charge you a fee to revalidate. However, if you do not have a Designated Body, you will be charged £1,127 to revalidate What if I am not working in the UK and have no Designated Body? Doctors without a connection to a responsible officer or a 'Suitable Person' revalidate through a process of annual appraisals based on “good medical practice”, annual returns submitted to the GMC and a five-yearly assessment. A revalidation decision is based on the outcomes of these activities. It may be harder to complete Revalidation if there is nobody to oversee your progress and support aspects such as your appraisals and clinical governance or to make a revalidation recommendation about you, but it is still very possible. If you do not plan to work in the UK in the upcoming months or you practice entirely outside of the UK, then you may not need a license to practice and it may be better to give up or suspend your license until required. You can still maintain your registration without a license to practice. Please click here for further information on giving up and restoring your license. Please note, if you fail to complete any activity within the time frames the GMC specifies – without a reasonable excuse, the GMC will begin the process of withdrawing your license to practice. Click here to find a suitable appraiser. When can I “connect” to my new NHS employer via GMC online for revalidation? Once you have been offered a job in the UK and have officially accepted it in writing, you should be able to establish a connection with your employer as your Designated Body. This can be done by logging in to your GMC online account, locating the ‘Revalidation’ option from the sidebar on the left hand side of the screen and selecting the name of the NHS Trust/Company you are due to start with. The GMC will send a message to whoever you name asking them to confirm that they know who you are and will indeed be assisting you with Revalidation – it may be worth confirming with HR that this will be approved before making the request if you are not yet in post. What if I do not complete revalidation? If you fail to comply with the requirements of revalidation and to engage with the local processes that underpin it, including appraisal, this will put your licence to practise at risk. You can find more information about how the GMC decides whether you can continue to hold a licence in their guide; Revalidation and the licence to practise: withdrawing, giving up or restoring your license and licensing appeals. Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor who needs support securing their first NHS post, email your CV to [email protected] and we can aid you in your relocation process. From securing a job, supporting you with your Tier 2 visa application to finding schools for your children. IMG Advisor Are you a member of our Facebook Group IMG Advisor? We publish regular blog posts, you can receive professional guidance and get the chance to meet other IMGs. References Licensing, R. (2019). Revalidation. ] Gmc-uk.org. Available at: https://www.gmc-uk.org/registration-and-licensing/managing-your-registration/revalidation [Accessed 17 Jun. 2019]. Licensing, R. (2019). Fees and funding. ] Gmc-uk.org. Available at: https://www.gmc-uk.org/registration-and-licensing/managing-your-registration/fees-and-funding [Accessed 17 Jun. 2019]. Gmc-uk.org. (2019). Guidance on supporting information for appraisal and revalidation. ] Available at: https://www.gmc-uk.org/registration-and-licensing/managing-your-registration/revalidation/guidance-on-supporting-information-for-appraisal-and-revalidation [Accessed 17 Jun. 2019]. Gmc-uk.org. (2019). ] Available at: https://www.gmc-uk.org/-/media/documents/RT___Supporting_information_for_appraisal_and_revalidation___DC5485.pdf_55024594.pdf [Accessed 17 Jun. 2019]. Bma.org.uk. (2019). BMA - Introduction to revalidation. ] Available at: https://www.bma.org.uk/advice/employment/revalidation/introduction [Accessed 17 Jun. 2019]. RCPCH. (2019). Revalidation - guidance for doctors working overseas. ] Available at: https://www.rcpch.ac.uk/resources/revalidation-guidance-doctors-working-overseas [Accessed 17 Jun. 2019].      

I have signed my NHS offer letter, what do I do next?

By Gabrielle Richardson
June 13, 2019

After you have signed your NHS offer letter, you will need to organise and collate a number of documents, to allow the hospital to apply for your CoS and in turn, you can then go ahead and apply for your Tier 2 visa. What documents do I need to send to the hospital before they can apply for my CoS? References – A minimum of two references is expected. Most NHS hospitals will ask for your references contact details and they will then contact them on your behalf requesting the reference. Alternatively, if the NHS hospital asks you, personally, to provide the references, ask your Consultant to provide you with one on your hospital’s letter headed paper, or normal paper with a hospital stamp and the reference should confirm your employment and dates of employment. However, each NHS Trust is different, so confirm what the HR department needs from you. Proof of Address – A minimum of two different proof of address’ is needed. Examples include a bank statement or a utility bill. The letter should clearly state your full name, address and it should be dated within the last three months. Please note, this address must be the same that will be used for your CoS application and your Tier 2 visa application. A Certificate of Good Standing for each medical council you have been registered with over the last 5 years A copy of your passport Your Police Clearance Certificate - You’ll need a certificate from any country you’ve stayed in for a total of 12 months or more over the last 10 years. Please note, this is also needed for any Tier 2 dependents over the age of 18 Evidence of your GMC Registration stage - If you have attended your ID check, you will need to provide the NHS Trust evidence of your license to practice. If you are waiting to attend your ID check, you will need to provide the Trust with the email evidence of your invitation. IELTS UKVI or UKNARIC certificate After you have collated the above documents, your NHS Trust can now apply for your CoS. Please note, your CoS MAY come back in a matter of days, as doctors and nurses on Tier 2 visas can now be applied for as unrestricted. However, this is dependent on the HR department successfully making the application. My CoS has been issued, what do I do now? Once your CoS has been correctly issued, with all the information printed correctly – you now apply for your Tier 2 visa! What documents do I need to apply for my Tier 2 visa? A valid Certificate of Sponsorship (CoS) – you have three months from the date it is issued to apply for your Tier 2 visa Tuberculosis Test Clearance Certificate, if your country is listed here Police Clearance Certificate - You’ll need a certificate from any country you’ve stayed in for a total of 12 months or more over the last 10 years. Please note, this is also needed for any Tier 2 dependents over the age of 18 Proof of English Knowledge – This can either be a score of 4 in IELTS UKVI or your UKNARIC certificate Maintenance – If your hospital has not ticked “Y” on the Maintenance box on your CoS, you will need to evidence that you have £945 in your account for the last 90 days prior to your application, Please note, your dependents will also need £630 in their personal account for the same period of time I have submitted my online Tier 2 visa application, what do I do next? When you submit your documents, you will be asked to select a date to attend your local biometrics appointment. Please take all of the above documentation with you to be verified. At the appointment, your fingerprints will be taken along with your passport which will then be returned in the post. Once your passport has been returned back to you, it will contain your travel vignette which will state the valid dates you can travel on. I have arrived in the UK, what do I do? After you have organised your accommodation (temporary or permanent), you will need to do the following: Attend your GMC ID check, if necessary Collect your BRP from your local post office Attend the police station within 7 days of arriving in the UK Attend your occupational health appointment (this must be cleared before you can start your NHS post) Attend your ID check with your hospital’s HR department Set up a UK bank account Attend your induction/shadowing period Isla, BDI Resourcing’s Relocation Executive’s top tips to ensure a successful relocation: Organise your documents from as early as possible. For example, it is important to bear in mind that your Police Clearance Certificate will take longer to obtain than other documents, so, try and get the process started as early as possible Respond to the hospital’s requests from as early as possible Research your new UK location, it is important to familiarise yourself with your new UK home. This can include local schools, activities, nice areas to live and transportation! Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor who needs support securing your first NHS post, email your CV to [email protected] and we would love to support you on your journey to the UK. IMG Advisor Are you a member of our Facebook Group, IMG Advisor? From joining, you will have access to frequent relocation blog posts, the opportunity to ask questions and receive professional support and the chance to meet other IMGs.  

Overview of MRCP Part 1

By Gabrielle Richardson
June 10, 2019

To work in Medicine or sub-specialities such as Cardiology, Respiratory and Gastroenterology at ST3+ level, you will need full MRCP and a pass in IELTS or OET. To obtain full MRCP, you will need to pass the following exams: MRCP Part 1 MRCP Part 2 PACES In today’s blog post, we provide you with an overview of MRCP Part 1. We provide you with the cost of the exam, international test centres, the examination format, modules tested and some useful revision resources to aid your studies. MRCP Part 1 UK Cost: £419 International Cost: £594 What overseas test centres can I sit MRCP Part 1 in? Bahrain (Manama), Bangladesh (Dhaka), Egypt (Cairo), Ghana (Accra), Hong Kong , Iceland (Reykjavik), India (Kerala), India (Kolkata), India (Mumbai) , India (New Delhi), Iraq (Baghdad), Iraq (Erbil), Jordan (Amman), Kenya (Nairobi), Kuwait (Kuwait City), Malaysia (Kuala Lumpur), Malta, Myanmar, Nepal (Kathmandu), Oman (Muscat), Pakistan (Karachi), Pakistan (Lahore), Qatar (Doha), Saudi Arabia (Jeddah), Saudi Arabia (Riyadh), Singapore, Sri Lanka, Sudan (Khartoum), United Arab Emirates (Abu Dhabi), United Arab Emirates (Dubai), United States of America (New Jersey), West Indies (Barbados, West Indies (Trinidad), Zimbabwe (Harare). Summary of MRCP Part 1 Two three-hour papers 200 multiple-choice (best of five) questions No images What is the examination format? MRCP Part 1 exam has two-paper format. Each paper is three hours long and contains 100 multiple choice questions in a best of five format.  The exam will test your core medical knowledge, comprehension and assess the ability to interpret the information presented and test your core knowledge. You will be presented with a clinical scenario or question and then five possible options, only one is correct. Please note, the other four options will be closely related to the correct option, but less correct, therefore acting as plausible alternatives. Each correct answer will be awarded as one mark and there is no negative marking. What will I be tested on? Cardiology 15 Clinical Haematology and Oncology 15 Clinical Pharmacology, Therapeutics and Toxicology 16 Clinical Sciences 25 Dermatology 8 Endocrinology 15 Geriatric Medicine 4 Gastroenterology 15 Infection Diseases and GUM 15 Neurology 15 Nephrology 15 Ophthalmology 4 Psychiatry 8 Respiratory Medicine 15 Rheumatology 15 What does the Clinical Sciences module comprise of? Cell, Molecular and Membrane Biology, Clinical Anatomy, Clinical biochemistry and metabolism, clinical physiology, genetics, immunology, statistics, epidemiology and evidence-based medicine. Useful Revision Resources Books Essential Revision Notes for MRCP Basic Sciences for Core Medical Training and the MRCP Best of Five MCQs for the MRCP Part 1 Pack (Oxford Specialty Training: Revision Texts) Basic Medical Sciences for MRCP Part 1, 3e (MRCP Study Guides) Question Banks Pass Medicine Pastest On Examination Practice Papers MRCP UK Question Quiz Blog OUP Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor with full MRCP and a pass in IELTS or OET, we can help you secure your first NHS post! Email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you with your entire relocation journey, from finding accommodation to securing schools for your children. Are you a member of IMG Advisor? Join our Facebook Group, IMG Advisor! We publish regular blog posts, you have the opportunity to ask questions and receive professional guidance and get the chance to meet other IMGs!    

Training Guidance Seminar for IMGs - London Event.

By Gabrielle Richardson
June 05, 2019

Are you an international doctor who wants to obtain a UK training post? We are proud to announce that BDI Resourcing is partnering with Dr Naseer Khan and Arora Medical Education to provide a UK Training Guidance Seminar for IMGs. There will be doctors in training, sharing their experience and guidance from the following areas: ACCS Emergency Medicine Core Anaesthetics Training Core Psychiatry Training General Practice Specialty Training Internal Medicine Training Obs and Gyne ST1 Training Ophthalmology ST1 Training Paediatrics ST1 Training Event Details Date: Saturday, 20 July 2019 Time: 10:00 - 17:00 Venue: ORTUS Conference and Events Venue, 82 - 96 Grove Lane, Camberwell, London, SE5 8SN. Entry: Free Refreshments: Sandwiches, tea, coffee. How do I register for the event? Although the event is free, we only have 100 spaces available. To attend, please fill in this form and wait for an email response for confirmation of your registration. Join the Facebook Event to stay up to date with the day’s event! https://www.facebook.com/events/443460856441712/ Event Structure: 10:00-10:20 Registration 10:20-10:30 Welcome by Dr Naseer Khan 10:30-11:00 Guidance for Ophthalmology ST1 by Dr Kimberley Tan 11:00-11:30 Guidance for O&G ST1 by Dr Sheena John 11:30-11:45 Arora Medical Education - your partner in GP Training 11:45-12:15 Guidance for Core Psychiatry Training by Dr Shah Tarfarosh 12:15-12:45 Guidance for GPST by Dr Shaz Khan 12:45-13:45 Lunch/Networking 13:45-14:15 Guidance for Core Anaesthetics Training by Dr Azeem Awan 14:15-14:45 Guidance for ACCS EM by Dr Nehal Sarja 14:45-15:00 BDI Resourcing - Relocating to the UK 15:00-15:30 Guidance for Paediatrics ST1 by Dr Ayesha Maitla 15:30-16:00 Guidance for IMT by Dr Abubaker Raheel 16:00-17:00 Q&A/Networking Any questions? Email us at [email protected] and we will be happy to answer any questions about the event. Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor looking to secure your first NHS service post, email your CV to [email protected] and we will be happy to support you on your journey to the UK. Join our Facebook Group Are you a member of IMG Advisor? We post regular relocation blog posts, you can ask questions and receive professional advice and get the chance to meet other IMGs.    

Your Biometric Residence Permit (BRP)

By Gabrielle Richardson
June 04, 2019

What is a Biometric Residence Permit? As an international doctor on a Tier 2 visa, you will receive a BRP if you: Obtained a Tier 2 visa for longer than 6 months Extended your Tier 2 visa for longer than 6 months Applied for permanent settlement in the UK Transferred your visa to a new passport Please note, you do not need to apply separately for your BRP. You will be issued one automatically when your Tier 2 visa is approved. What is on my BRP? Your permit will state your name, date, place of birth, your fingerprints and photographic identification. It will also provide details on your immigration status and whether you have access to public funds. Typically, your National Insurance number should be printed on the back of your BRP. If you receive it and it is not printed on the back of your BRP, you will need to apply for one here. What should I do if my BRP does not arrive? Please do not worry if you arrive in the UK and your BRP has not yet been issued. If it has been 10 days after arriving in the UK, you can follow the progress of your BRP here. The Home Office typically responds within 5 working days to inform you of what to do next. Can I start my NHS post if BRP has not yet arrived? Yes. If you are waiting receiving your BRP, it is legal to take up your new employment within an NHS hospital. What do I do if I have lost my BRP? If you lose your BRP or it is stolen, you can only order a replacement from inside the UK. The Home Office will contact you within one working day of reporting it. Please note, if you locate your BRP at a later date after receiving a replacement, you cannot use the original. The cost of a replacement BRP is £154. Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor who plans to relocate to the UK and join the NHS, email your CV to [email protected] and we will be happy to support you on your journey. Join IMG Advisor Join our online community of over 10,000 doctors! We share regular relocation blog posts, and updates. References GOV.UK. (2019). Biometric residence permits (BRPs). ] Available at: https://www.gov.uk/biometric-residence-permits/replace-visa-brp [Accessed 4 Jun. 2019].    

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