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A Snapshot of... Surrey

By Samantha Joubert
November 20, 2019

Located in the South East of England, Surrey is a county that is only a thirty-minute train ride away from London. With a population of 1.9 million, its rich history and culture as well as its abundance of green spaces makes it the perfect place to live if you want the advantages that go hand-in-hand with being close to London, but the beauty and tranquility of the countryside. It is home to Guildford, Woking, Dorking, Farnham and Epsom. Facts about Surrey It is England’s leafiest county and has the highest concentration of trees in the UK. They hold fun, charity races every year, including a pram race, a raft race, and yes, even a plastic duck race! William the Conqueror ordered for Guildford Castle to be built in 1066. Sir Roger Moore (who played James Bond!) believes that he saw a ghost in his hotel room in the Guildford Angel Hotel! Whilst staying at the White Horse in Dorking, Charles Dickens wrote much of his “Pickwick Papers”. Dorkings’ Emblem is a five-toed cockerel. The Shah Jahan Mosque in Woking is the oldest Mosque in Britain and was built in 1889. In H.G. Wells’ book, War of the Worlds, he had the Martians’ first landing take place on Horsell Moor in Woking, as Wells lived there during the time he was working on the book. Brookwood Cemetery, located in Woking, is the largest Cemetery in Britain. Leith Hill can be found in Dorking and is the highest point in the South East of England. Cost of Living in Surrey Accommodation One-Bedroom Apartment in the City Centre £1,106.25 One-Bedroom Apartment Outside of the City Centre £816.67 Three-Bedroom Apartment in the City Centre £1,761.67 Three-Bedroom Apartment Outside of the City Centre £1,331.25   Transportation 1ltr Petrol £1.29 One-Way Public Transport Ticket £4.15 Monthly Public Transport Ticket £95.65 1km Taxi Journey £2.50   Entertainment Meal out for two in a local pub £30 Meal out for two in a mid-range restaurant with three courses £50 Cinema Tickets for two people £24 One month of gym membership £46.67 Beer 0.5ltr bottle £4.00 Coke/Pepsi 0.33ltr bottle £1.46 Cappuccino £2.81   Time it Takes to Travel to other Cities in the UK from Surrey by Train London – 35 Minutes Birmingham – 2 Hours 35 Minutes Manchester 3 Hours 12 Minutes Liverpool – 1 Hour Bristol - 2 Hours 15 Minutes Cardiff - 2 Hours 38 Minutes Edinburgh - 5 Hours 31 Minutes   Education in Surrey Surrey has 220 Primary Schools, 59 Secondary Schools, 49 Sixth Forms and Colleges and 3 Universities. Most schools in Surrey have an Ofsted rating of ‘Good’ and a large quantity have received ‘Outstanding’, with very few schools being given a lower rating than this. The University of Surrey is the 35th best university in England.   Things to do in Surrey   Guildford Castle A fantastic family day out, and a way to explore the history of Surrey, and Guildford in particular. The castle is open all week between April and September and on weekends in March and October. This historic castle features a viewing platform on the roof, offering a panoramic view of Guildford’s breathtaking countryside. Inside, you will find a model of how the castle would have once looked so thank you can get an idea of what it would have been like when it was first built.  Entry is inexpensive, adult tickets currently cost £3.50, children’s tickets cost £2.00 (under 5’s get free entry) and you can also buy a family ticket for two adults and two children for £10.   Leith Hill Tower Built in 1765 by Richard Hull of Leith Place, Leith Hill Tower marks the highest point of South East England at 1029ft! You can reportedly not only look out over the countryside but even gaze out at the English Channel and in the right conditions, catch a glimpse of Big Ben! With a whopping 78 steps, this one is probably best attempted on a day when you’re feeling ambitious!   Thorpe Park Located in Chertsey, Thorpe Park is a family amusement park. It features a themed hotel, but it is also possible to stay in hotels nearby and just buy tickets to enter the park. For more adventurous souls, there are a number of adrenaline inducing rollercoasters as well as a number of high intensity rides. If you’re not a fan of roller coasters and water rapid rides, they have a relaxing beach-themed area where you can lounge by the pool, and kids can enjoy the water slides or have a splash in the pool. They also have a number of children’s rides and attractions for younger family members. Prices vary depending on how long you plan to stay and if you intend to stay on site in their hotel, but a day ticket for entry to the park and for access to the attractions currently starts at £33.   The Lightbox The Lightbox is an art gallery and museum located in Woking, perfect for anyone with a flair for the artistic. They often host events including comedy nights and poetry readings, as well as activities for kids. Entry to The Lightbox is free for adults and children, however if you wish to view the main or upper galleries, you’ll need to purchase a day ticket which currently costs £7.50. It’s also easily accessible for less able visitors.    British Wildlife Centre A perfect day out for animal lovers, the British Wildlife Centre is located in Lingfield, and features a number of creatures native to the UK. Among the pine martens, red foxes, otters, owls and badgers, they also boast Britain’s first walk-in red squirrel enclosure. If you get peckish, there’s also a café and gift shop on site, as well as a picnic area for a sunny day! An adult ticket currently costs £12, and a child’s ticket (aged 3-15) costs £8.50. They also have a family ticket that costs £37 for two adults and two children.   Yvonne Arnaud Theatre The perfect venue for a more cultural day out, the theatre offers numerous pre and post West End performances, as well as comedy, opera, ballet, and children’s theatre. The theatre is also home to the Riverbank Café where you can dine or simply enjoy a cup of coffee or glass of wine, making it the perfect place to eat whether you’re attending a matinee or evening performance.   Relocating to Surrey If you’re an international doctor looking to relocate to Surrey, or another location in the UK, please email you CV to [email protected] and we can support you in securing an NHS post and on your journey to relocate to the UK. Are you a member of our Facebook group? When you join IMG Advisor, you will join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs into the group every single day. We will also always be on hand to answer all your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 45 videos on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS! Listen to BDI Resourcing on the go with our Podcast, IMG Advisor. You can find us on Apple podcast, Spotify, Stitcher and Buzzsprout. We have a number of episodes with tips and advice on relocating to the UK and the routes you can take to achieve this.   References Living, C. and Kingdom, U. (2019). Cost of Living in Surrey. [online] Numbeo.com. Available at: https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/in/Surrey-United-Kingdom [Accessed 19 Nov. 2019]. Smith, J. (2019). 9 astonishing things you might not know about Guildford. [online] getsurrey. Available at: https://www.getsurrey.co.uk/news/surrey-news/9-astonishing-things-you-might-14620909 [Accessed 19 Nov. 2019]. Fun Kids - the UK's children's radio station. (2019). Surrey - Fun Kids - the UK's children's radio station. [online] Available at: https://www.funkidslive.com/take-me-out/attractions/things-to-do-around-the-uk/surrey/# [Accessed 19 Nov. 2019]. Visitsurrey.com. (2019). Weird & Wonderful Facts about Surrey - Official tourism website for Surrey. [online] Available at: https://www.visitsurrey.com/ideas-and-inspiration/weird-and-wonderful [Accessed 19 Nov. 2019]. Mail Online. (2019). Why Surrey really is leafy: County found to have highest concentration of trees in exhaustive survey that shows there are 280million in England and Wales. [online] Available at: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2841951/Why-Surrey-really-leafy-County-highest-concentration-trees-exhaustive-survey-shows-280million-England-Wales.html [Accessed 19 Nov. 2019].  

How to Revise for MRCEM OSCE

By Samantha Joubert
November 19, 2019

MRCEM is a postgraduate qualification that will typically allow you to work at ST3 level within the field of Emergency Medicine. MRCEM OSCE (formerly known as MRCEM Part C), is one of three exams you will need to pass in order to complete MRCEM. In this article we will explain the necessary requirements needed to take MRCEM OSCE, what you can expect from the examination, and we will offer you some revision tips and resources to give you the best opportunity of passing.   Requirements and Conditions In order to be eligible to take the exam: You must hold a GMC approved primary medical qualification. You must have completed the UK Foundation Programme or equivalent. Have passed the FRCEM primary exam after August 1st 2016 Or have passed the MRCEM Part A exam after August 1st 2012 and before 21st July 2016. Or have passed FRCEM SAQ after 1st August 2016 Or have passed MRCEM Part B after 1st August 2012 and before 31st July 2016. Have 6 months of experience in Emergency Medicine at a level above Foundation Year 1, and 36 months experience overall. You will have a maximum of six opportunities to attempt the exam. Previous attempts of MRCEM Part C will not count towards the number of times you can take MRCEM OSCE.   How much will it cost, and where can I sit the exam? MRCEM OSCE currently costs £450 and can be sat at test centres in London or India. This exam will be conducted in English, even if you are taking the test in India and the Royal College of Emergency Medicine has stated that to successfully pass the exam, you will need a high level of English which could be compared to IETLS level 7. However, it is not a requirement to sit IELTS/OET before applying for your MRCEM OSCE exam. How am I being tested? The goal of the MRCEM OSCE exam is to assess how you would deal with real life situations in an emergency environment and how you would diagnose and treat patients. Although the situations and patients will not be real in the examination, you will be expected to behave as if they are. You will not only be tested on your medical knowledge, but the way in which you interact with patients, so communication and body language will be important factors in this examination. The exam consists of eighteen stations, and you will spend seven minutes in each station dealing with a different clinical scenario in each. Of these eighteen stations, there will be sixteen patient encounters and two rest stations. You will also be given an additional minute between each scenario to read any instructions for the next section.  In this assessment, you will be presented with common clinical conditions and scenarios that you would encounter in a real emergency department, stations will feature situations including both adults and children so you should be prepared to deal with a variety of patients and conditions. Please email us at [email protected] for a list of clinical scenarios to use for your MRCEM revision and your NHS interview. How do I prepare? We would recommend that you give yourself at least three months to prepare, but if you are able to spend longer on the preparation process, that’s advisable. The Royal College of Emergency Medicine website strongly endorses familiarising yourself with the Royal College of Emergency Medicine Curriculum 2015 as the examination will test the competencies covered in years 1-3 of the curriculum. Doing this initial research could be the difference between passing and failing. Work with Colleagues The IMG Connect website recommends starting a study group with other doctors planning to take their MRCEM OSCE exam, this will allow you to practice mock, timed scenarios, where you take turns in the role of the doctor, patient and examiner. In the position of the examiner, you can take notes regarding the doctor’s performance, which will give you greater insight into how you can approach scenarios yourself. Timing yourselves will also help you to get an idea of what the actual exam will be like and should hopefully help you to work efficiently in the seven minutes you will have in each station. Practicing with others will also help you to work on communication skills, which, as we mentioned earlier, will be vital in this particular examination. Try to be aware of your body language as well as your speaking and listening skills, as the examiner will be evaluating this too.    It may also be worth speaking to more senior doctors in your department and asking them to assess your performance. They may be able to observe you at work and offer feedback on any areas you could improve on. Books An obvious resource for exam preparation, but a great option if you aren’t in a position to practice with others. The best way to succeed in any exam is to study as much as you possibly can well in advance of stepping into the test centre. MRCEM Part C: 125 OSCE Stations 2nd Edition by Kiran Somani Brain Map for MRCEM OSCE by Ahmed Hassan Self-Assessment for the MCEM Part C by Rebecca Thorpe, Simon Chapman and Jules Blackham Use online resources Facebook Make the most of Facebook groups, there are many groups online where you can talk to other doctors in the same situation as you, allowing you to ask questions and find the best study resources. MRCEM Examination Resources Facebook Group Videos There are plenty of examples of what the clinical scenarios will be like on YouTube. Watch these to familiarise yourself with the way the stations will be set up, and how you should go about dealing with them. Clinical Examination OSCE guides Courses If possible, we would highly recommend completing a preparation course. These will usually either take place face to face or online but are well known for helping doctors to pass more quickly than those who do not complete a course. The main downside to this study method is finding one that you are able to attend, and the cost of completing them. However, if it is at all possible, we would recommend that these courses are worth the cost. Bromley Emergency Courses MRCEM OSCE Course What can I do on the day of the exam? Many IMGs who have taken MRCEM OSCE have strongly advised that you utilise the minute of reading time between stations to really understand any instructions you have been given. Try to remember to be friendly, be aware of your body language and keep your posture open. The examiner will take into account the fact that you’re nervous but try to be aware of these things. After the Exam The Royal College of Emergency Medicine has stated that it should take approximately 4 weeks from the week of your examination for the results to be released, and an additional four weeks for letters and feedback to be posted. If you are unsuccessful, try not to be discouraged. It can be disheartening but failing can actually be a valuable learning experience. Take on the feedback you are given, and work hard to improve on those areas in preparation for the next time you attempt the exam. If there were any areas that you couldn’t study, or perhaps neglected to for whatever reason, make sure that you really focus on these areas in preparation for your next exam. If there were any study techniques you found particularly helpful previously, try to utilise these where possible, or if you felt that your techniques weren’t working for you, explore some new study techniques until you find the ones that are right for you. Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor who has decided that the UK is for you, email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you in securing an NHS post and on your journey to the UK today. Are you a member of our Facebook Group? When you join IMG Advisor, you will join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs into the group every single day. We will also always be on hand to answer all your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 40 videos on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS! Listen to BDI Resourcing on the go with our Podcast, IMG Advisor. You can find us on Apple podcast, Spotify, Stitcher and Buzzsprout. We have a number of episodes with tips and advice on relocating to the UK and the routes you can take to achieve this.   References Rcem.ac.uk. (2019). Dates and Fees. [online] Available at: https://www.rcem.ac.uk/RCEM/Exams_Training/Exams/Dates_Fees/RCEM/Exams_Training/Exams/Dates_and_Fees.aspx [Accessed 12 Nov. 2019]. IMG Connect. (2019). MRCEM OSCE (Part C) – preparation, revision, resources and courses | IMG Connect. [online] Available at: https://www.imgconnect.co.uk/news/2019/10/mrcem-osce-part-c-preparation-revision-resources-and-courses/217 [Accessed 12 Nov. 2019]. Rcem.ac.uk. (2019). Regulations & Info Packs. [online] Available at: https://www.rcem.ac.uk/RCEM/Exams_Training/Exams/Regulations_Info_Packs.aspx [Accessed 12 Nov. 2019].  

Q&A with Dr Ibidolapo Ijarotimi, GPST1 Warwick Hospital

By Gabrielle Richardson
November 18, 2019

Thank you for taking the time to interview with us Dr Ibidolapo Ijarotimi.  We wish you all the best with your GP training and life in the UK with your children. Introduction 1. What speciality, grade and what hospital do you work at? GPST1, Geriatric department, Warwick Hospital 2. What country did you relocate from? Nigeria 3. Would you share with us your personal mission as a doctor? All I have ever wanted and still want is to bring joy to people by helping them heal, physically and mentally. I also want to work towards improving the work conditions of junior doctors in the NHS. 4. At what point in your career did you decide you wanted to relocate to the UK? About 3 years after I finished medical school although it didn’t come to pass for over a decade after. 5. What were your motivations for wanting to do so? Mostly just the need to have better work environment and better socioeconomic conditions The Relocation Process 6. How long did it take you to relocate, how difficult did you find the process, and do you recommend it to other IMGs? I started the process pretty much in 2008 by applying for HSMP then. I got it but some circumstances prevented me from relocating then. Afterwards I had to start writing IELTS and PLAB. Throughout the course of 10 years that it eventually took me, I wrote IELTS at least 8 times PLAB1 2 times PLAB2 5 times. 7. Is there anything you would have liked to have known before deciding to relocate? I think I had enough knowledge before I came. Average salary to negotiate for, work hours and rota, estimated monthly budget, total cost of getting British passport. 8. And now once you live in the UK? You can’t know how it really is working as a foreigner in the NHS, you can only experience it. But if I could know the way it feels I would suggest that. Thoughts on the UK 9. For you, what are the key benefits of living in the UK? Opportunity for my children to have broad education, develop their talents and attend good universities 10. How do you feel you settled in your chosen location within the UK?  I am well settled. It is urban but I live near the city edge so I get the benefit of city living and the quietness of rural area. My closest family is only 35 minutes drive away and we see each other very often. Our children spend holidays in both homes. The NHS 11. How did you feel on your first day of working within the NHS, your first week, month and then how do you feel now compared to when you first started? My first day I felt so happy and proud of myself. It was a dream come true. Gradually over the next few months I started feeling stressed and disillusioned and perhaps a bit burnt out. Now, I am kind of at a plateau. I am a more patient doctor. The NHS has taught me that. 12. How would you describe the support you received from your hospital after starting your new position? This new position I am in as a GP trainee the support is immeasurable. I recently went through a rough patch and that was when I I was overwhelmed by the support I got. From Health Education England and the hospital. 13. What is your opinion on the NHS? Working within it and as a patient receiving care? The NHS is good. If not for the NHS the mortality rate in this country will be very high however, it is over stretched. The doctors and nurses are stretched too thinly thereby putting them at greater risk of making mistakes. To make it worse there is the culture of blame. It makes staff unnecessarily fearful practicing defensive medicine which is expensive and can even be unsafe for patients. In addition, there is need for the system to be more tolerant and accommodating of foreigners. 14. How do you find working in the UK compared to your home country? It is more stressful. Mostly because of fear of making errors. GP Specialty Training 15. Why did you choose to specialise in General Practice? I chose GP for several reasons; 1. It is the closest to my background in Community medicine 2. It was relatively easy to get into 3. The training is short 4. I believe it will give me the work life balance I crave. 16. What were your thoughts on working as a GP before you came to the UK? I didn’t really have any idea about how it will be working as a GP but now in the training and visiting GP surgeries I now know what to expect. 17. How are your MRCGP studies going? So far, I am finding it quite challenging but interesting. It is definitely doable. 18. Do you have any advice for any other doctors who want to pursue GP Training? They should go for it. It is a good decision. Once you are GP it is easier to find a work life balance. 19. Any tips on the application process? Pay attention to the SJT section of the stage 2. And be natural in the stage 3 part, skills learnt for PLAB also comes useful here. Having previous exposure to NHS will certainly help but it is not necessary. Acute Medicine 20 .Before your GP training, I understand that you worked in Acute Medicine – what were your thoughts? It was a rude introduction to UK health system but also quite fun and challenging. To be fair, I loved it but I found it too stressful for me. 21. Any advice for IMGs about to join an Acute Medicine Unit? Be aware that it is a very busy unit. Very much like emergency medicine. You need to have current medical knowledge at your fingertips and be confident of your decisions The Future 22. What are your hopes and goals for the future? I hope to become a GP (working 3 or so days week as either locum or salaried. I don’t want to be a partner. I also want to spend the remaining 2 days being a blogger. Links to Dr Dale's blogs: Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/Meenadalediary/ Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/meenadalediary/ If you are an international doctor who would like support with relocating to the UK and joining the NHS, email your CV to us at [email protected] and we can support you on your journey.

Overview of EDAIC Part 2

By Gabrielle Richardson
November 15, 2019

The European Diploma in Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care is a two-part examination that covers the relevant basic sciences and clinical subjects for a Specialist Anaesthetist. By obtaining full EDAIC and a pass in IELTS/OET to evidence your English language skills you will be able to take up an ST3+ level posts. To read our blog post on EDAIC Part 1, click here. Please note, if you are a Specialist in Pakistan, you must have either FCPS or the MCPS to be eligible to sit the EDAIC Part 2 exam. Other diplomas in Anaesthetics issued in Pakistan can be accepted for the EDAIC Part 1 but not for the EDAIC Part 2 exam. If you hold FCPS or MCPS, you are not exempt from sitting EDAIC Part 1. The Cost EDAIC Part 1 – Written £292 EDAIC Part 2 – Oral £472 first attempt £292 following attempts Exam Certificate £42.99 EDAIC Part 2 is held annually between February and November in several test centres across the world. Click here to book your exam. Application Criteria To apply, you must evidence: A pass in EDAIC Part 1 A copy of your specialist diploma with an official translation into English Being a certified Anaesthesiologist or a trainee in Anaesthesiology Examination Structure You will be tested within four separate 25-minute oral examinations. For all four vivas, you will be given a brief written presentation 10 minutes before meeting the examiners. The Morning: Viva 1: Applied Basic Sciences You will be tested first on cardiovascular and/or respiratory physiology. You will then be tested on applied pharmacology, applied anatomy, physiology and physiology/pharmacology combined. Viva 2: Applied Basic Science You will be tested on applied pharmacology and then applied cardiovascular and/or respiratory physiology, clinical measurement, applied pharmacology/physiology combined. Afternoon Viva 3: Clinical Critical Care) This viva will start with questions on Intensive Care of Emergency Medicine and then the follow up questions will be based on clinical management, x-ray interpretation, anaesthetic specialties and general questions. Viva 4: Clinical Management of Anaesthetic Problems You will be provided with an anaesthetic problem scenario and then asked about if there are any relevant internal medicine topics, ECG interpretation, local or regional anaesthesia and some general questions. Knowledge Tested The examination aims to assess your knowledge of: Basic sciences, clinical anaesthesia (including obstetric anaesthesia and analgesia), resuscitation and emergency medicine, specialist anaesthesia (e.g. neuro-, cardiac, thoracic, paediatric), intensive care, management of chronic pain and current literature. Click here to find out the full list of topics tested. The Marketing Criteria The examiners use a marking system which is divided into three marks. The marks are: -1 = Fail +1 = Pass +2 = Pass + There will be 20 topics of the day and each examiner will award you with one of the marks. All the marks will then be added up to make a final score. To be successful, you will need: A minimum score of 25 out of 40 in the afternoon sessions An overall score of at least 60/80 The European Society of Anaesthesiology suggest that when you are revising you should try to achieve a consistent and broad range of knowledge rather than become experts in narrow fields. Reasons a doctor fails EDAIC Part 2 Inability to apply knowledge and/or basic science to clinical situations Inability to organise and express thoughts clearly Unsound judgement in decision making and problem solving Lack of knowledge and/or factual recall When an examiner assesses your answer, they ask themselves: Does the doctor have a good foundation of knowledge? Can the doctor apply knowledge and understand its relevance to the practice of anaesthesia and intensive care? How does the doctor approach a problem? Is the approach logical and well thought out? Have alternative options been explored and understood? Is the doctor dangerous? Revision Materials Books Short Answer Questions in Anaesthesia: An Approach to Written and Oral Answers The Anaesthesia Science Viva Book Please click here for a full list or recommendations from The European Society of Anaesthesiology. YouTube Videos EDAIC Part 2 – Sample Examination Video Resources used for EDAIC and EDIC Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor who has decided that the UK is for you, email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you in securing an NHS post and on your journey to the UK today. Are you a member of our Facebook Group? When you join IMG Advisor, you will join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs into the group every single day. We will also always be on hand to answer all your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 45 videos on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS! References How to prepare for EDAIC. (2019). [ebook] European Society of Anaesthesiology. Available at: https://www.esahq.org/~/media/ESA/Files/EDUCATION/EDAIC%20Part%20II/How%20to%20prepare%20for%20the%20EDAIC.ashx [Accessed 14 Nov. 2019].

How do I Anonymise my CESR Evidence?

By Samantha Joubert
November 14, 2019

In order to work as a permanent Consultant within the NHS, you will need to be placed onto the Specialist Register. This can be done in three ways: CCT, CESR CP and CESR. CCT: If you have completed all of your training within a GMC approved training programme. CESR CP: If you have completed some of your training overseas and some of your training within a GMC approved training programme. CESR: If you have completed all of your training in a non-approved training programme. For further information on CESR, read our dedicated CESR article here. Please note, it is possible to work as a Locum Consultant/ Fixed Term Consultant without being the Specialist Register. For more information on this or current opportunities, email us at [email protected] In this blog article, we explain the process of anonymising your evidence for your CESR application. Why do I Need to Anonymise my Evidence? The GMC expects all doctors applying for CESR to anonymise sensitive information such as patient and colleague details in any evidence they’re providing. This is to comply with patient confidentiality standards which comes under good medical practice. There are also the General Data Protection Regulations, known as GDPR; a data protection law which, as the name suggests, is in place to protect people’s personal information and the way it’s handled. If you fail to anonymise your evidence, the GMC can delete any information they deem to be in violation of these rules from your application and can ask you to resubmit it. It’s likely that they will also inform the Royal College you are applying for CESR with that you have failed to anonymise sensitive information within your application. It’s incredibly important to comply with this as not only can it postpone the application process for you, but it is actually in breach of the law and goes against the good medical practice code (something which won’t reflect well on you as an applicant or a doctor). How to Anonymise Information Depending on whether you are submitting evidence electronically or submitting hard copy evidence, there are different methods for anonymising sensitive information. If your evidence is electronic you can use a redaction software - we would recommend making sure you use something reputable as you will be dealing with sensitive information. For example, Adobe Acrobat allows you to redact information for PDFs. It is also possible to use the font feature on Microsoft Word to hide text, then go to file, click ‘check for issues’, then select the ‘hidden text’ tick box. This will remove any hidden text from the document, but please be aware that this will remove the text permanently. We advise that you create a new copy of the document you’d like to redact text from before attempting this method – this ensures you have a backup should you make a mistake. If you are submitting hard copy evidence, the GMC advises concealing any sensitive information using a crayon. A marker may seem like the obvious choice, but the GMC has stated that text is often visible through marker once it has been scanned, so crayon is the more reliable choice.   Patient Information Patient information must be anonymised due to the standards of the previously mentioned good medical practice; doctors have a duty of care that means patients must be able to trust doctors to keep their personal data and information confidential. Though they may seem like obvious things to anonymise, you do not need to redact patient gender or date of birth, as any variety in ages and gender of the patients you’ve worked with can be used to support your experience during your CESR application. If you’re not sure where patient information might be included, the GMC states that it can often be found in: Medical Reports Case History Referral Letters Logbooks Patient Lists Thank You Letters Emails Cards Meeting Minutes Complaints Any identifying patient information should be anonymised, including: Patient names (first names and last names) Addresses Street Names Postcodes Phone Numbers Email Addresses Any other contact details NHS or URN numbers Reference numbers on documents Any details of patients’ relatives Colleague Information Colleague information would come under the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and the process for identifying colleague information is similar to that of a patient, but with a few differences. Colleagues include people you’ve provided a reference for, who have been involved in a complaint submitted by you or who you have assessed.   You’re likely to find colleague information in: Participation in assessment or appraisal Complaints Colleague information that should be anonymised: Colleague names (first and last names) Phone Numbers Email Addresses Any other contact details Login codes and reference numbers of assessments GMC Numbers Once you have anonymised your evidence, you will need to verify it. We will cover this in more detail in a future article, but this information is also available on the GMC’s website. If you would like advice on how to organise your CESR evidence, read our blog post here. Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor who has decided that the UK is for you, email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you in securing an NHS post and on your journey to the UK today. Are you a member of our Facebook Group? When you join IMG Advisor, you will join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs into the group every single day. We will also always be on hand to answer all your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 40 videos on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS! References Gmc-uk.org. (2019). How do I anonymise my evidence?. [online] Available at: https://www.gmc-uk.org/registration-and-licensing/join-the-register/registration-applications/specialist-application-guides/cesr-with-registration/how-do-i-anonymise-my-evidence [Accessed 8 Nov. 2019].

Advanced Life Support Courses & The NHS

By Gabrielle Richardson
November 13, 2019

An effective Resuscitation Service is an operational priority and obligation within every single NHS hospital, with employers expected ensure that their staff receive training and regular updates. They also have a responsibility to provide equipment, managerial support and continual reappraisals of expected standards and results. In order to achieve this, NHS hospitals will each have a set of standards for resuscitation training in both basic and advanced life support. The general guidelines are stated below: To ensure patients receive safe, current and evidenced-based, effective resuscitation, when appropriate. To provide staff with guidance on the resuscitation courses that are most appropriate to them depending on their clinical role To implement and develop prevention strategies to reduce the number of preventable cardiac arrests To reduce cardiac arrest morbidity and mortality through education To ensure relevant staff are updated and adequately supported to deal with resuscitation situations To ensure relevant staff are updated and adequately supported to deal with resuscitation situations Reduce clinical risk Your Training Each NHS hospital will have to adhere to an Annual Training Schedule. Courses offered by each hospital should include: Basic Life Support – Adult (BLS) Paediatric Basic Life Support – (PBLS) Adult BLS Cascade Training Paediatric BLS Cascade Training Automated External Defibrillator (AED) Training AED Cascade Training Recognition and Treatment of Anaphylaxis Recognition of the Sick Patient for Health Care Support Workers Paediatric Emergency Ward-Based Scenarios Ward-based sick patient and mock-arrest scenarios (Adult) Immediate Life Support (ILS) Advanced Life Support (ALS) Advanced Life Support Recert Advanced Paediatric Life Support (APLS) Advanced Trauma Life Support Paediatric Life Support (PLS) Acute Life-Threatening Events – Recognition and Treatment (ALERT) Ill Medical Patients Acute Care and Treatment (IMPACT) Neonatal Life Support Which international life support courses are accepted by the NHS? Advanced life support courses look fantastic on your CV, however, since the NHS has no information or control over the standards of the courses conducted outside of the EU – there are only a few international courses that are recognised as equivalents to UK life support courses. Does the NHS recognise the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) qualifications? The European Resuscitation Council courses are recognised and accepted as equivocal by the RC (UK). Does the NHS recognise the Australian Resuscitation Council qualifications? The NHS only recognises the Australian Resuscitation Council Advanced Life Support and Immediate Life courses as equivalent. Does the NHS recognise the American Heart Association (AHA) qualifications? Unfortunately, the NHS does not accept any courses from the American Heart Association as they are not able to examine the information or standards for these courses. What happens when I join my NHS Trust? Once you start working for your NHS hospital, they will arrange the relevant course for you. Most hospitals will offer a study budget of £400 which can be used to purchase the course. You are advised to complete your course within the first six months of joining. How long is my certificate valid for? Most certificates are valid for one year, however, there are some exceptions. Check the expiry date when you receive it. The Resuscitation Council (UK) states that you have one year from the expiry date of your certificate within which to recertify your qualification. Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor who has decided that the UK is for you, email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you in securing an NHS post and on your journey to the UK today. Are you a member of our Facebook Group? When you join IMG Advisor, you will join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs into the group every single day. We will also always be on hand to answer all your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 35 videos on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS! References Resuscitation Training. (2019). 19th ed. [ebook] Cardiff and Vale University Health Board. Available at: http://www.cardiffandvaleuhb.wales.nhs.uk/sitesplus/documents/1143/Resuscitation%20Training%20Guidelines%20updated%202017.pdf [Accessed 6 Nov. 2019]. Resus.org.uk. (2019). FAQs for Candidates. [online] Available at: https://www.resus.org.uk/information-on-courses/faqs-for-candidates/ [Accessed 12 Nov. 2019].

Q&A with Dr Aashish Raghu, JCF Trauma and Orthopaedics

By Gabrielle Richardson
November 12, 2019

BDI Resourcing supported Dr Raghu with his relocation to the UK and securing an NHS post.  Thank you for taking the time to feature in our Q&A Dr Raghu, it was a pleasure supporting you on your journey to the UK and we wish you all the best with your future in the UK. Introduction 1. What speciality, grade and what hospital do you work at? I’m working in Trauma & Orthopaedics as a Junior Clinical Fellow at Lister Hospital, Stevenage. 2. What country did you relocate from? India 3. Would you share with us your personal mission as a doctor? I support the NHS’s motto of offering free and high-standard Healthcare to the public. Isn’t this why we wanted to become doctors?  4. At what point in your career did you decide you wanted to relocate to the UK? What were your motivations for wanting to do so? I was always in awe of the NHS and it’s workings to help each and everyone. When I was doing my Orthopaedic training in India I realised I wanted to learn more to better my knowledge. I personally feel UK offers the best ground to learn and progress in my  career, in keeping with the latest development. The Relocation Process 5. How long did it take you to relocate, how difficult did you find the process, and do you recommend it to other IMGs? It was a very smooth journey, all thanks to Jonny Carter and Gabrielle Richardson at BDI who were with me with every step. I definitely recommend BDI Resourcing. 7. Is there anything you would have liked to have known before deciding to relocate? And now once you live in the UK? I was briefed very well by the BDI team and was adequately prepared. I was in touch with them for each and every step till I started work and it was a very satisfying experience. Bless you all! I was able to adapt and am settling in. Thoughts on the UK 8. For you, what are the key benefits of living in the UK? The wonderful weather, beautiful architecture, excellent work environment and helpful colleagues. Last but not least, the scrumptious food… 9. How do you feel you settled in your chosen location within the UK? I stay at the outskirts of London.  It’s got a vibrant High Street with everything to offer. Less traffic and the hustle-bustle of Central London. I do miss my family and friends but I make time to keep in touch with them, regularly. The NHS 10. How did you feel on your first day of working within the NHS, your first week, month and then how do you feel now compared to when you first started? I imagined it would be daunting on my first day but it was the exact opposite. I was warmly welcomed by my colleagues.  It was a little difficult at first because there are a lot of things we get to learn on the job which is very different from back in our home countries. Especially executing things requires protocol and documentation which I gradually picked up. Now I feel more confident and have realised that patient safety is the key in making all the right decisions. 11. How would you describe the support you received from your hospital after starting your new position? I am lucky to be working with wonderful people. They are supportive and always willing to listen. Wouldn't have asked for better. 12. What is your opinion on the NHS? Working within it and as a patient receiving care? I’m satisfied with the way NHS works but I feel it is understaffed. Everything we do is to make sure the patient receives the quality care with safety. At the end of the day, the patients are the most understanding people who worry about us too. 13. How do you find working in the UK compared to your home country? There are a lot of differences and I am grateful for my experience in my home country which has taught me a lot in my surgical field. I am completing my learning to be a safe and updated doctor in the NHS. Trauma and Orthopaedics  14.  Why did you choose to specialise in Trauma and Orthopaedics? There’s no better satisfaction to treat your patient and see them walk again.  15. What were your thoughts on working as a T&O before you came to the UK? Did reality meet your expectations? Since I did my training in T&O in India, I wanted to learn more and update myself. I have also learnt that safe-practice is the best. Reality indeed did meet my expectations. 16. Do you plan to apply for Surgery Specialty Training? I would love to pursue training in the UK because  training offers great benefits to making an overall confident and safe surgeon with good exposure to clinical research as well. 17. How was studying for MRCS? Do you have any advice for other doctors currently studying for it? The MRCS was a difficult exam because it was not just Orthopaedics but more of General Surgery and ENT as well. I had the great company of other aspirants during my preparation which I think was vital.  My advice is to get your basics strong, practice well and you will pass the exam with flying colours. 18. Do you have any advice for doctors about to join a new NHS post in Trauma and Orthopaedics?  Come to work in the NHS with an open mind and learn to adapt quickly because it’s very busy and at the end of the day we need to be safe doctors for our patients. T&O offers a rewarding career and must be considered. The Future 19.  What are your hopes and goals for the future? I want to progress into T&O training and also contribute to clinical research. If you are an international doctor who would like our support with relocating to the UK and joining the NHS, email your CV to [email protected] Are you a member of our Facebook Group? When you join IMG Advisor, you will join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs into the group every single day. We will also always be on hand to answer all your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 35 videos on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS!

How to Travel Around the UK

By Samantha Joubert
November 08, 2019

Whether you’re visiting the UK or you’re in the process of relocating, it can be tricky to get your head around the different modes of transport and how they work. In this article we will try to give you an overview of the best ways to travel in the UK, how you can buy tickets, and which parts of the country they are available in. Please note, each area of the UK has its own services and systems in place and so they may vary slightly from place to place.   Travel by Bus Buses are a commonly used form of public transport in the UK and are estimated to account for 59% of public transport journeys. Most locations will have a bus service, making it easy to travel by bus. City buses tend to be more frequent and often provide services to more distant locations as well as around the immediate area. Services in smaller locations may be less frequent, but they will usually still provide a few routes. Buses are popular as they allow people to travel cheaply, though the cost of tickets will vary depending on the region, the general consensus is that travel by bus is one of the cheaper options available. Buses in the UK are also very accessible as there is usually space for wheelchairs and pushchairs on board. Most companies will offer a range of tickets depending on your needs. You can usually buy a ticket for a single journey that will allow you to travel to a single destination on a particular service, or a return ticket, which will allow you to travel to your destination and back on the same service. Most companies will offer a day ticket that allows you to travel multiple times on the same service or on multiple services in the area. Many locations also offer weekly, monthly and even yearly passes for people who use the service often. These long-term tickets usually allow you to travel on multiple bus services as well. Family tickets and discounted tickets for children and the elderly are also available. Many buses allow you to pay for paper tickets onboard using cash, or in cities and some towns, you can use contactless debit cards and Apple pay. It is worth noting that many bus companies in the UK are attempting to phase out paper tickets to reduce boarding times and aid environmental change. Some services require you to have purchased your ticket before you board the bus, either from machines at the bus stop, or on apps or travel cards. Again, this will depend on the area, so it is good to research the place you’re travelling to beforehand to find out what the bus company expects passengers to do. You can often find this information online and can sometimes purchase the relevant tickets on a company’s website or on a relevant app. Bus stops in the UK will have timetables displayed, and some will even have electronic timetables informing you when the next bus is due. You can also check timetables online and plan your journey on websites such as Traveline. On Traveline, you can enter the location you’re travelling from, your destination, and the time you’d like to leave, and it will tell you which stop the relevant bus is departing from, at what time, and if there are any additional buses you will need to catch. Some bus companies offer free WiFi and USB charging ports on their buses, though smaller services will not include these features, so we wouldn’t recommend relying on it to charge your devices, and they cannot be used for laptops. The downside to buses is that they can be slower than trains as they must contend with traffic. Services in rural areas can be less frequent. Finally, long term tickets such as weekly, monthly or yearly tickets can be quite expensive, though still cheaper than other modes of transport. For long distance journeys, there are also coach services, these mostly link cities, and the buses themselves are built for long distance journeys, often having toilets, charging outlets for laptops and phones and places to store suitcases and hand luggage. The seating also tends to be more comfortable on coaches than on standard buses. They mostly pick up and drop off at bus stations rather than smaller bus stops, but it depends on the service and route. If you’re interested in travelling by coach, you can use the websites below to plan your journey. National Express Megabus   Travel by Train Trains are another popular means of transport, cities will have train stations, as will many smaller regions, making them another great way to travel around the country. Train services usually offer transportation around an area, as well as to destinations further away. Inner town and city transport can be more limited than with buses as there are less train stations than there are bus stops. That said, they are an excellent way to travel if you want to go further afield. Trains are usually faster than buses as they don’t have to compete with traffic, and there is usually less stops for a train as well. What also decreases travel time is that you can either buy your train tickets beforehand or buy them from a conductor on the train. Even if you must change trains during your journey, a conductor on any train will be able to sell you tickets for the entirety of your journey. They will usually accept cash and debit card payments. When buying tickets, many stations in the UK will have booths or machines where you can purchase your train tickets beforehand. Booths will usually be run by a staff member who will accept cash or card payments, while machines are self-service and will generally only accept payment by credit or debit card. Many train services now have apps where you can buy paperless M-tickets beforehand as well. A notable difference with train tickets is that the price for the same journey will differ throughout the day and on different days of the week. With trains, you can purchase off-peak and super-off-peak tickets. Peak times are the times of day when a train service is at its busiest, so in the early mornings and late afternoons and evenings during the week when people will be commuting to and from work and school. Weekends are generally considered to be off-peak and will be cheaper than standard tickets. However, you will not be able to travel at peak times with an off-peak ticket and may have to pay for another ticket if you try to board a train at peak times with one of these. You can, however, travel at any time with a ticket that isn’t classed as off-peak. Super off-peak tickets will vary, but they will be cheaper than off-peak tickets, and will cover the least busy times of day. Again, you will not be able to use a super off-peak ticket to travel on a train at peak hours, or even during off-peak hours, so while they are cheaper, they will be more restrictive than standard or off-peak tickets. Another thing to note about UK trains is that they have two different types of carriages, first class and standard, there tends to be one or two first class carriages, and then the rest will be standard. You can only sit in first class if you have purchased a first class ticket, as they are more expensive. The benefit of travelling first class is that the carriages are generally more spacious, the seating will be more comfortable and there is complimentary food and drinks, as well as free WiFi and newspapers. Perhaps more often than with buses, you may need to change trains during your journey, most trains are travelling a long distance and won’t always stop at your desired location, so you will need to make sure you are aware of which station you need to change at and what time your connecting train will leave. Like buses, you can check timetables at train stations, but they are also available online. You can plan a journey on Traveline, or look on Trainline or National Express. These sites will inform you if you need to change to a different train at any point in your journey, which station and platform your next train will leave from, as well as the time it will leave. Sometimes, if your train is running late, you may miss your connection. If this happens you can usually ask one of the conductors when the next train will be. Most trains will have toilets, luggage and bike racks, small tables, free WiFi and electrical outlets allowing you to charge laptops and other devices. These facilities will vary between services, but they tend to be more comfortable than travelling by bus. The main downside of travel by train is the cost, it can be quite expensive to travel long distance, so many opt to travel by coach instead. Travel by Car Most people in the UK travel by car. The benefit of driving is that you have the freedom to go wherever you like whenever you like. It’s also an excellent mode of transport if you live in a more rural area where buses and trains aren’t frequent or easily accessible. Some may consider driving a cheaper option as they don’t have to pay for regular bus or train tickets however others may dispute that the cost of petrol, parking, insuring and running a car makes it the more expensive option. It’s very dependent on an individual’s circumstances, and what you want out of your journey when travelling around the UK. We have a full article explaining the cost of running a car in the UK to give you a better idea of the cost in comparison to other modes of transport. In order to legally drive in the UK, you will need a full, valid driving license and will need to be seventeen years of age or older. If your driving license was issued in the UK, EU, or in a European Economic Area (EEA), you will be able to drive any vehicle stated on your driving license. If you have a license from a designated country (Andorra, Australia, Barbados, British Virgin Islands, Canada, Falkland Islands, Faroe Islands, Gibraltar, Guernsey, Hong Kong, Isle of Man, Japan, Jersey, Monaco, New Zealand, Republic of Korea, Singapore, South Africa, Switzerland and Zimbabwe) you will legally be allowed to drive in the UK on your full, valid driving license for 12 months when you become a resident, but after that you must exchange your license for a UK license. If it isn’t from one of the designated countries, you will be allowed to drive with it, as long as it is a full, valid license, and you will be allowed to do this for 12 months from when you became a resident, after that, you will need to apply for a provisional UK driving license and pass the theory and practical driving tests to obtain a UK license. You can learn more about acquiring a driving license in this article. These rules apply whether you are just visiting or if you are relocating. We would advise having a look at the direct.gov website about the restrictions on driving in the UK though, and which vehicles you will be allowed to drive. If you are visiting, or if you have not yet decided if you want to purchase a car, you can rent one for the duration of your visit or for a journey. The rules for renting a car in the UK can vary between rental companies, but generally you will need your passport and a full driving license. Some will only hire out to you if you have had your license for a certain amount of time, usually between 1 and 5 years, and often you will need to be over 25 years of age. If you have a non-EU or UK driving license you will also need an international driving permit (IDP). IDPs are valid for 12 months, and you should try to secure one three months before coming to the UK. Sometimes, you will need to provide proof of address. If you’re only in the UK on a short-term basis, you may also be asked to provide proof of travel dates to and from the UK in the form of flight tickets or hotel bookings. Car rental companies will also charge a deposit fee which you will get back once you return the car at the end of the rental period, providing there is no damage to the vehicle. If you are interested in renting a car, these are a few companies you can look at to get an idea of the requirements and potential costs: Avis Hertz Europcar A disadvantage of driving is that it can be tricky if you are not accustomed to UK roads, we drive on the left-hand side of the road, which is different to most other countries. It takes time to get used to, but it can be off-putting to some, and is something to consider if you’re not a confident driver. Cars can also be less helpful in cities, and if you are planning to visit or relocate to a city, we would recommend doing some research beforehand, as other means of transport such as buses and trains can actually be cheaper and easier to rely on. Due to congestion and pollution in many UK cities, particularly London, there are restrictions on certain roads, areas and times of day that you can drive a car. If you are planning on driving in a city, it’s important to check the rules and restrictions for that area, as you can be fined for breaking these rules even if you were unaware of them. The final disadvantage of using a car is the price of parking. It can often cost upwards of £10 a day to park in city car parks, and many instead choose to find alternate means of transport when travelling within a city, even if they own a car. Travel by Taxi Taxis are another flexible form of transport if you want the freedom of a car but if perhaps you don’t have a license or would simply prefer not to drive yourself. Taxi drivers usually know the area very well or have a GPS so can usually get you to your destination more quickly than if you were trying to find it yourself. Most places will have taxi companies. Depending on where you’re travelling from, you can either find a Taxi rank, or simply call a taxi company to pick you up from where you’re staying. You can also book taxis in advance with many companies. It’s also easy to search for local taxi companies online or find their numbers in local phone books. In some areas, transport apps are now in use as well including Uber,  Ola, Lyft and others. These apps are usually available on Apple and Android, and allow you to request a car, and input your current location and your destination, you can often pay through these apps too. A nearby driver can then accept your request and will pick you up. The benefit of apps like these are that you usually can track how far away your driver is and rate your journey and driver. Some disadvantages of taxis are that they can be more expensive than public transport, particularly for long journeys, and some taxi companies will only travel a certain distance. Taxi rides will run on a timed meter, and if your cab gets stuck in traffic, the meter will continue to run, even if you’re not moving. It’s also important to make sure that any taxi company you travel with is legitimate and reputable as occasionally, people will pretend to be taxi drivers to try and make money. This is something to be particularly aware of if you’re travelling alone and at night. You can check before you get in a car if the driver has a taxi license. This will usually be displayed on the dashboard. Travel by Bike Bikes have become increasingly popular in the UK for both commuters and tourists. Unfortunately, they are not the best option for long distance journeys (unless you’re feeling ambitious!) but are excellent for sightseeing and travelling around a small area. A reason bikes have become so popular in recent years is because it is better for the environment. Particularly in cities where air pollution and congestion are poor, many opt to cycle instead. It’s also the cheapest form of transport on this list. Once you’ve purchased a bike and the necessary accessories, the maintenance and upkeep will be considerably less than that of a car. To improve the environment, many cities now have rental bikes that can be found at points all over the city. You can rent these bikes for a set amount of time for as little as £1, and if you want to use the bike for longer, you can simply pay more. A lot of cities have also implemented cycle lanes to make it easier for cyclists to navigate traffic and pedestrians. Like cars, there are certain rules to cycling, particularly on roads. You can see the full list of requirements and rules here, but the main one is to familiarise yourself with the highway code as cyclists are expected to adhere to the rules of the road in the UK. As well as being more environmentally friendly and healthier, cycling is faster than walking, you don’t have to pay for parking, petrol or for tickets, and it can be a scenic way to travel and acquaint yourself with an area. The main disadvantages of cycling are that you can’t travel long distances, you will need more than one bike if you’re not travelling alone, if the weather is bad, which it can often be in the UK, particularly during the winter months, it’s not the most pleasant form of transport, and it can also be more dangerous, particularly if you are cycling on busy main roads. Travel by Underground Train The most well-known form of underground travel is the London Underground, a series of underground train lines that connects different areas of the city. The only other cities in the UK that run underground services are Glasgow, Newcastle and Liverpool. Underground transport is incredibly popular, particularly in London, as it’s incredibly fast. It’s possible to get from one side of the city to another in a matter of minutes on the London Underground, something that would take much longer if you were driving, walking or taking a bus. You can catch underground trains, (also referred to as tubes and subways) from underground stations which are well signposted. Focusing on London Underground in particular, it is divided into nine zones, and there are eleven tube lines. The cost of travel will depend on the zones you’re travelling between. This can seem confusing to anyone not familiar with them, but there are maps at every station and on the trains themselves to help you figure out where you need to go, they are also colour coded to make them slightly easier to navigate. The tube is also one of the most accessible forms of transport in London as lines run from 5am until midnight, and on Fridays and weekends some later night services run too. Unlike over ground trains, you will not be able to buy tickets on the train. You can buy paper tickets from ticket machines at tube stations, these will usually accept credit or debit cards. Paper tickets can be slightly more expensive as cities are encouraging passengers to use contactless payment methods instead, however this is a good choice if you’re only planning on travelling on the underground service for a couple of stops, and don’t intend to plan your journey around it. A more popular form of payment in tube stations is to use a contactless debit card. There are yellow touchpads on the turnstiles in underground stations where you can scan your debit card like you would scan a ticket, this will automatically charge the cost of your journey to your bank when you scan your card at the destination point of your journey. There is a daily cap as well, so you will only be charged a set amount a day, though this cap will vary depending on the zones you travel in. If you don’t have a contactless debit card, you can get an Oyster card. You can either get a visitor Oyster card which you will need to order online before your journey, or a standard Oyster card. Oyster cards will work in the same way as a contactless debit card in the sense that you will scan them at the turnstiles when you enter and leave a tube station. The difference is that you must add money to the Oyster card in order to use it. You will pay a £5 deposit which will be refunded once you’ve returned the card, and then top up your Oyster card to pay for your journeys. You can order standard Oyster cards online if you are a UK resident, if not you can find them at Oyster Ticket stops in newsagents, at visitor centres or at the tube stations themselves. You can also top up your card at these locations. If you have a contactless debit card but aren’t sure whether to use it or get an Oyster card, it should be noted that it is the same price to travel with your debit card as it would be to use an oyster card, and you won’t have to pay a deposit to use your debit card. Another benefit of contactless and Oyster cards in London is that they can be used on other forms of transport including buses.  Like over ground trains, there are off-peak times, and if you are travelling during peak times the journey can cost more. However, if you’re using an Oyster or contactless card, you needn’t worry too much about this as the correct amount will be charged to your card anyway. You will need to be aware of this if you have a paper off-peak ticket, however. In London, the tube runs every few minutes, so you don’t need to consult a timetable, but rather make sure you are travelling on the right line and in the right zone. If you plan to travel in London, we would recommend planning your route ahead of time if possible, and getting acquainted with a map of the underground. Underground services in the other cities mentioned are similar as you can buy paper tickets or purchase a smartcard to allow you to travel more easily. They also offer tickets that cover different zones, and long-term tickets for a week’s worth of travel and a month’s worth of travel as well. This will vary from city to city though. The maps for Glasgow, Newcastle and Liverpool underground services are a lot simpler than the London underground map, but we would still recommend having a look ahead of time to gain a better understanding of how to navigate your way around the cities. The disadvantages of using underground services, particularly in London is that you can’t travel to other parts of the country, you’re restricted to travelling within that city, it unfortunately isn’t a mode of transport that is widely available across the country, only in the four cities mentioned. Travel by Plane A less commonly used form of travel around the UK due to it being such a small country, most people opt to take the train or simply drive. There are a few situations where it may be beneficial to travel by plane though, in particular, travelling between England and Scotland. There are airports in most major cities in the UK, and you can get direct flights from many of them to Edinburgh, Glasgow, Aberdeen and Inverness. A benefit of getting a flight to Scotland is that it can be considerably faster than a train, to give you an idea, it can take 4 hours 20 minutes to get to Edinburgh from London by train, and 1 hour 15 minutes by plane. If this is something you think you would be interested in, you can look for plane tickets with Skyscanner or Expedia. You can also book tickets directly through British Airways or easyJet. Travel by Tram Several places in the UK have tramlines as it’s an environmentally friendly alternative to cars and buses, however tram locations are limited to Croydon, London’s docklands, Birmingham, Manchester, Sheffield, Newcastle, Nottingham and Blackpool. Trams are a good means of transport for travelling a short distance within a city, they are faster than walking, and are better for the environment. They tend to have certain zones, and tickets will be priced according to zone. Like underground travel, you are often able to use contactless debit cards and mobile apps as tickets using smart readers at the tram stops, and you can pay for your journey as you travel. Generally, you will be charged the cost of a single journey, or if you’re travelling multiple times a day, the cost will be capped at a set price. There are also smart cards like the Oyster card mentioned previously in the article. You can order these cards online and add money to them. Many tram stops will have ticket machines where you can purchase the relevant tickets as well, or travel shops where you can go in and buy tickets. Trains and buses tend to be faster than trams, however trams have more stops than trains, and are also cheaper than both trains and buses. If you are staying in a city that has trams, then it can be worth using them.   Overall, our best advice for travelling around the UK would be to research the area you’re going to ahead of time and plan your journey around how far you want to travel, which modes of transport are available within that area, and how much you’re willing to spend. Timetables and ticket prices are available for most areas online making it easy to plan your travel route. Whether you’re travelling first class or riding a bike, we hope that you enjoy your journey! Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor who has decided that the UK is for you, email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you in securing an NHS post and on your journey to the UK today. Are you a member of our Facebook Group? When you join IMG Advisor, you will join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs into the group every single day. We will also always be on hand to answer all your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 40 videos on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS!   References Zestcarrental.com. (2019). [online] Available at: https://www.zestcarrental.com/blog/2016/12/20/hiring-a-car-in-the-uk/ [Accessed 7 Nov. 2019]. GOV.UK. (2019). Driving in Great Britain on a non-GB licence. [online] Available at: https://www.gov.uk/driving-nongb-licence [Accessed 7 Nov. 2019]. visitlondon.com. (2019). London Underground. [online] Available at: https://www.visitlondon.com/traveller-information/getting-around-london/london-tube [Accessed 7 Nov. 2019]. Nationalrail.co.uk. (2019). National Rail Enquiries - m-Ticket. [online] Available at: https://www.nationalrail.co.uk/times_fares/ticket_types/100261.aspx [Accessed 7 Nov. 2019]. Times, T. and times, O. (2019). Off-Peak Train Times | Super Off-Peak Times | Trainline. [online] Thetrainline.com. Available at: https://www.thetrainline.com/train-times/off-peak [Accessed 7 Nov. 2019]. Visitorshop.tfl.gov.uk. (2019). Visitor Oyster Card | TfL Visitor Shop. [online] Available at: https://visitorshop.tfl.gov.uk/tfl/london-visitor-oyster-card/?utm_medium=referral&utm_source=tfl.gov.uk&utm_campaign=tfllondon%20underground%20daily%20cap [Accessed 7 Nov. 2019]. Transport for Greater Manchester. (2019). Where to buy tram tickets. [online] Available at: https://tfgm.com/tickets-and-passes/where-to-buy-tram-tickets [Accessed 7 Nov. 2019].    

The top 5 reasons to work within the NHS

By Gabrielle Richardson
November 05, 2019

The UK’s National Health Service (NHS) is one of the largest employers in the world and the biggest in Europe, employing over 1.3 million staff. For the NHS, a typical day includes: Over 835,000 visits to GP Practice’s Almost 50,000 people Accident and Emergency Departments Over 49,000 outpatient consultations 94,000 people are admitted to hospital as an emergency 36,000 people in hospital for planned treatment The NHS offers a huge range of exciting and challenging opportunities for doctors who are passionate about making a difference. So, we wanted to share the top reasons on why it is amazing to work within the NHS. 1. You will make a difference to someone’s life every single day Whether you are a Pediatrician treating children or a Surgeon carrying out life-saving operations, you are part of an amazing team that makes a huge difference to peoples’ lives every single day. 2. World renowned training The NHS provides world-class training and support to their doctors to help them develop unique skills. You will learn things that you did not know you needed. The best thing about practicing medicine in the UK is that there is always more to learn, from new equipment to new procedures. 3. The opportunity for professional development The NHS allows you to develop both professionally and personally. You will deal with high pressure situations that will enhance your medical knowledge and skills whilst overlapping into your personal life to make you into a better person. 4. Access to fantastic discounts Working within the NHS allows you to save money on everything! From travel, shopping, insurance to finance. You can also save money and earn cashback at over 50 stores with the NHS Cashback Card. The list of companies you can receive discount from are, but are not limited to: Ray-Ban, Asics, Apple, Moss Bros, Paperchase, Sofology, Halfords, New Balance, Clarks, GHD, Hotpoint, Benefit, Flipflop, PureGym, Gymshark, Graze Snack Boxes, Leon, Nandos, Gourmet Burger Kitchen, Case Nero, TGI Friday’s, Ask Italian, Yo! Sushi, Zizzi, Thorpe Park, Jet2holidays, Travelodge, Virgin Holidays, The London Dungeons, Shrek’s Adventure London, BuyaGift Experience Days, Go Ape Adventure, Murder 57 Murder Mystery Breaks, Quad Nation Quad Biking. Sign up for free today to start saving with Health Service Discounts. 5. An excellent Pension Scheme Having one of the best pension schemes in the entire UK will help you secure a better future. When you retire, you will be entitled to a tax-free lump sum that can support you through the later years of your life. Click here to find out more information on the NHS Pension Scheme. Dr Naseer Khan’s Reasons for Living in the UK: 1. “A sense of satisfaction: the NHS is beautiful system that does not discriminate on the basis of your financial status. Healthcare in the UK does not only include treatment at the hospital, but it includes a completely physical and mental wellbeing at both home and work as well. It gives me immense satisfaction that I am part of this system. 2. Learning: The UK is open to all and because the UK has always been a centre of excellence in medicine, it is one of the best places in the world to learn and grow as a doctor. 3. The Working Hours: We only work an average of 40-48 hours per week. So, we get enough time for ourselves. 4. Money: Even as junior doctors, we earn enough to able to afford the latest cars and to buy a house in the UK. As a junior doctor, my earning in Pakistan was only 10% of my earning in the UK.” Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor who has decided that the UK is for you, email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you in securing an NHS post and on your journey to the UK today. Are you a member of our Facebook Group? When you join IMG Advisor, you will join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs into the group every single day. We will also always be on hand to answer all your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 35 videos on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS! References Fullard, A. (2019). 5 Reasons Why It’s Awesome to Work in the NHS - Health Service Discounts. [online] Health Service Discounts. Available at: http://blog.healthservicediscounts.com/5-reasons-why-its-awesome-to-work-in-the-nhs/ [Accessed 9 Oct. 2019].

A snapshot of... Edinburgh

By Samantha Joubert
November 04, 2019

Edinburgh is the capital city of Scotland, and is known for its rich history, stunning architecture and beautiful natural areas. Its combination of city living and abundance of parks and nature makes it a popular city to live in. As well as this, it also has its own airport, keeping it well connected to other big cities across the UK.   Facts About Edinburgh The city has more listed buildings than any other location in the world! It’s the greenest city in the UK and has an impressive 112 parks. The largest arts festival in the world is the Edinburgh Fringe. The famous “Stone of Destiny” is kept in Edinburgh castle, there is an old legend that the stone is fake, and that the real stone was stolen and swapped with a fake at some point in history. Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling wrote some of Harry Potter in a café in Edinburgh, the café is called The Elephant. Edinburgh Castle is built on an extinct volcano. The national animal of Scotland is a unicorn. The world’s only Knighted penguin, Sir Nils Olav, lives at Edinburgh Zoo (no, we’re not joking!)   Cost of Living in Edinburgh One-Bedroom Apartment in the City Centre  £785.77 One-Bedroom Apartment Outside of the City Centre  £627.50 Three-Bedroom Apartment in the City Centre  £1,400 Three-Bedroom Apartment Outside of the City Centre  £1,027.88   Transportation 1ltr Petrol  £1.27 One-Way Public Transport Ticket  £1.70 Monthly Public Transport Ticket   £55.00 1km Taxi Journey  £1.37   Entertainment Meal out for two at a local pub  £30.00 Meal for two at a mid-range restaurant with three courses  £55.00 Cinema tickets for two people  £20.00 One month of gym membership  £33.08 Beer 0.5ltr bottle  £4.00 Coke/Pepsi 0.33ltr bottle  £1.33 Cappuccino  £2.66   Time it Takes to Travel to other Cities in the UK from Edinburgh by Train Glasgow – 47 Minutes Inverness – 3 Hours 36 Minutes Aberdeen – 2 Hours 37 Minutes London – 4 Hours 39 Minutes Birmingham – 4 hours 27 Minutes Manchester – 3 Hours 12 Minutes Liverpool – 5 Hours 40 Minutes Bristol – 6 Hours 11 Minutes Cardiff – 6 Hours 43 Minutes Leeds – 3 Hours   Time it Takes to Travel to other Cities in the UK from Edinburgh by Plane Inverness – 2 Hours 15 Minutes Aberdeen – 2 Hours 55 Minutes London – 1 Hour 15 Minutes Birmingham – 1 Hour 15 Minutes Manchester – 1 Hour 10 Minutes Liverpool – 4 Hours 35 Minutes Bristol – 1 Hour 10 Minutes Cardiff – 1 Hour 25 Minutes Leeds – 3 Hours 40 Minutes   Education in Edinburgh There are 88 Primary Schools, 23 Secondary Schools, 4 main Colleges and 6 Universities in Edinburgh. Many of the Primary and Secondary schools are state schools, but there is also a good number of independent schools. Some of the schools in Edinburgh also teach in Gaelic as well as English. Edinburgh is also home to the 29th best university in the world, and the sixteenth best university in the UK, the University of Edinburgh.   Things to do in Edinburgh   Edinburgh Castle The most famous castle in Scotland, the oldest parts of the castle are said to have been built in the 12th century. It’s possible to go on guided tours of this historic landmark, hosted by the castle stewards, where you can learn about the history of the castle and its past occupants, as well as glimpsing the Crown Jewels and the previously mentioned “Stone of Destiny”.  An excellent day out to learn about the history of Edinburgh and its famous castle. There is also access to the castle for less able visitors. Royal Botanic Gardens A free attraction, the park spans an impressive 70 acres. Its history dates back 300 years, making it a beautiful day out for nature and history lovers. The park is home to ten Glasshouses, each having its own climate to accommodate a vast variety of exotic plants. As well as this, the park is also home to a beautiful Rock Garden and Chinese Hillside area, making it both a beautiful and relaxing location to explore. National Museum of Scotland The museum is a free attraction and features over 20,000 artefacts from Scotland’s vast history, making it an excellent way to learn about the rich history and culture of Scotland Edinburgh Zoo Home to the world’s only Knighted penguin that we mentioned earlier in this article! If that doesn’t make it unique enough, it also houses over 1,000 animals, many of them rare and endangered, and is the only zoo in the UK that has koalas and giant pandas. The zoo even features special animal-handling sessions and walkthrough habitats. As well as being a fantastic family day out, it’s also part of one of Scotland’s conservation charities, RZSS. Festivals Edinburgh hosts a variety of festivals during the summer from around June to August, celebrating culture, art and music. The famous Edinburgh Fringe is the largest arts festival in the world and hosts a vast selection of artistic talent from theatre to circuses, children’s shows, dance and more. The Edinburgh Fringe is an incredible experience no matter your age and is a must see if you decide to relocate to Edinburgh.   Relocation to Edinburgh If you’re an international doctor looking to relocate to Edinburgh, or another location in the UK, please email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you in securing an NHS post and on your journey to relocate to the UK. Are you a member of our Facebook Group? When you join IMG Advisor, you will join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs into the group every single day. We will also always be on hand to answer all your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 40 videos on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS!   References WorldStrides. (2019). 12 Facts About Edinburgh - WorldStrides. [online] Available at: https://worldstrides.com/blog/2016/07/12-facts-edinburgh/ [Accessed 4 Nov. 2019]. Bars, B. (2019). 13 Cool Facts You Probably Didn't Know About Edinburgh. [online] st-christophers. Available at: https://www.st-christophers.co.uk/travel-blog/cool-facts-you-probably-didnt-know-about-edinburgh [Accessed 4 Nov. 2019]. Living, C. and Kingdom, U. (2019). Cost of Living in Edinburgh. [online] Numbeo.com. Available at: https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/in/Edinburgh [Accessed 4 Nov. 2019]. Visitscotland.com. (2019). Things To See & Do & Attractions in Edinburgh. [online] Available at: https://www.visitscotland.com/destinations-maps/edinburgh/see-do/# [Accessed 4 Nov. 2019].  

A snapshot of...Blackpool

By Samantha Joubert
October 31, 2019

Blackpool is a lively seaside town located in the North West of England in the county of Lancashire. It’s known primarily for its beautiful beach, famous Blackpool Tower, and its Illuminations lightshow that takes place on the promenade between August and September every year. A popular location, it has a population of around 139,300. Blackpool also has the benefit of being close to both Liverpool and Manchester whilst having a considerably lower cost of living than either of the cities making it a desirable place to live.     Facts about Blackpool Blackpool Illuminations first took place in 1879. Thousands of people gathered to watch as eight large electric bulbs were switched on to light the promenade. This annual show now features more than a million bulbs and is an impressive six miles long! Blackpool Illuminations have been switched on by a number of celebrities over the years, the most unusual of them being a famous race horse named Red Rum. The iconic Blackpool Tower is modelled on another familiar landmark…France’s famous Eiffel Tower. Blackpool Tower is an incredible 315 foot tall! It is the most popular seaside resort in the UK, making it both a desirable location to live, and a popular tourist destination. One of the first electric steam railways was built in Blackpool in 1885 and is still running to this day!   Cost of living in Blackpool One-Bedroom apartment in the City Centre £467 One-Bedroom apartment outside of City Centre £462 Three-Bedroom apartment in the City Centre £683 Three-Bedroom apartment outside of the City Centre £620   Transportation 1ltr Petrol £1.25 One-Way Public Transport Ticket £2.10 Monthly Public Transport Ticket £54 1km Taxi Journey £1.55   Entertainment Basic dinner out for two in a neighbourhood pub £24 Two tickets to the cinema £16 One month of Gym Membership £29.95 0.5ltr Beer £3.10 0.33ltr Coke/Pepsi £1.12 Cappuccino £2.51   Time it takes to travel to other UK Cities from Blackpool London – 4 hours 43 minutes Birmingham – 2 hours 18 minutes Manchester – 1 hour 7 minutes Liverpool – 1 hour 17 minutes Bristol – 3 hours 58 minutes Cardiff – 4 hours 19 minutes Leeds – 1 hour 33 minutes Edinburgh – 3 hours 42 minutes   Education in Blackpool There are 33 primary schools, 8 secondary schools, 3 sixth forms and colleges and a university in Blackpool. Many of the schools have achieved an Ofsted rating of ‘good’ or ‘outstanding’.   Things to do in Blackpool   Blackpool Tower  One of the most iconic landmarks in Blackpool, it hosts several activities for the whole family to enjoy. If you trek to the top of the tower (don’t worry, they have lifts to the top!) you’ll reach Blackpool Tower Eye, where you can get a breathtaking view of the sea, and of course, Blackpool itself. Blackpool Tower also hosts Blackpool Tower Dungeons, an event exploring the spooky history of Blackpool so that you can learn a little about the old seaside town, a ballroom where regular dances and themed nights take place throughout the year and even a circus, a perfect activity for families! Blackpool Pleasure Beach A thrilling amusement park with activities for family members of all ages. They have a variety of rides if you’re feeling adventurous, but also host meet and greets with Nickelodeon characters for children, dazzling ice-skating performances in their arena, adventure golf, and a Ripley’s Believe it or Not exhibition featuring strange an unusual collections. Blackpool Zoo An excellent location for a day out, Blackpool Zoo has over 1000 animals, access for less able visitors, and boasts the best sea lion displays in the UK. They’ve also won and been nominated for multiple tourist awards over the years. Blackpool Beach One of the main attractions in Blackpool, and a reason tourists flock to the town every summer. As well as enjoying the san, sea and ice cream, they often host shows on the promenade, including the Blackpool Illuminations and have three piers to explore, each with their own host of attractions, rides and eateries to explore. Stanley Park 390 acres, Stanley Park is the perfect location for nature lovers. It is said to be a sophisticated park, featuring some art deco flair, an even an Art Deco café. As well as its beautiful foliage, there is also a boating lake, shuttle train and model village to occupy your time. It’s an excellent location for a relaxing walk or a family day out. Relocation to Blackpool If you’re an international doctor looking to relocate to Blackpool, or another location in the UK, please email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you in securing an NHS post and on your journey to relocate to the UK. Are you a member of our Facebook Group? When you join IMG Advisor, you will join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs into the group every single day. We will also always be on hand to answer all your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 40 videos on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS!   References Grand UK Holidays. (2019). 10 things you never knew about Blackpool!. [online] Available at: https://www.grandukholidays.com/travel-blog/post/1-blackpool [Accessed 31 Oct. 2019]. Visit Blackpool. (2019). Attractions. [online] Available at: https://www.visitblackpool.com/things-to-do/attractions/?page=1&filter=1#search [Accessed 31 Oct. 2019]. Living, C. and Kingdom, U. (2019). Cost of Living in Blackpool. [online] Numbeo.com. Available at: https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/in/Blackpool [Accessed 31 Oct. 2019].  

IELTS or OET: Which test should I do?

By Gabrielle Richardson
October 30, 2019

When relocating to the UK to work for the NHS, you will need to evidence your English language skills at two points of the process. The first is for your GMC Registration and the second is for your Tier 2 visa. There are two tests acceptable: IELTS and OET. Both exams test your four basic English language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. In this blog post, we compare the two exams and decide on which exam is best for an international doctor who wants to relocate to the UK. IELTS – International English Language Testing System IELTS is considered the ‘gold standard’ of English language tests as it tests your broader English language and not just workplace specific language. Some doctors prefer to sit IELTS because it will help them speak English confidently in the UK outside of work. However, it is argued that IELTS is not always the best exam for doctors because it focuses on subjects and language that would be irrelevant to a healthcare professional. It is important to note, that if you do decide to sit IELTS, you need to sit the IELTS Academic version. OET – Occupational English Test In our experience, OET may be a better option for a doctor who wants to relocate to the UK. The OET exam is a professional-specific test that will examine your English language skills that relate to your profession. For example, in the OET speaking element, you would play the role of a doctor and communicate with a patient, carer or family member. These role-plays are based on workplace situations you would encounter every single day. How is IELTS scored? To pass the IELTS exam, an overall score of 7.5 must be achieved, with a minimum of 7.0 in each of the test areas. How is OET scored? You will need to achieve a minimum grade B or a point score of 350 across all test areas to pass the OET exam. A Comparison Cost and Location When it comes to cost, the OET exam is the more expensive of the two tests. OET costs £349, whereas the IELTS comes in considerably cheaper at around £185, depending on your test location. Resultant of IELTS non-specific nature, it is the more popular test of the two. Over 940,000 people in 120 countries take the test each year as it is recognised by over 6,000 institutions around the world. In comparison, OET can only be sat in over 35 countries worldwide. Duration and Availability With regards to duration, both tests are relatively similar. OET takes just over 3 hours to complete and IELTS takes 2 hours and 45 minutes. To consider the availability of each test, the OET exam can be sat just once a month in every location it is available Whereas, IELTS is held more frequently, on average around once a week. Which test is easier? Each test varies in difficulty. The OET exam is easier in some ways because it is more specific to health care. So, as a doctor, you will be able to make use of your healthcare knowledge, vocabulary and experiences. This means that it is likely that you will find the writing and speaking portions of the test a little easier, as you would already have experience speaking English in those circumstances. To exemplify, for the writing element of the OET exam, you will be asked to write a referral letter for a patient. Whereas for IELTS, you will need to write an essay, a formal letter or analyse written data. To summarise, as a doctor who would have experience in speaking in English within a medical capacity rather than generally, you may want to opt for the OET exam. Evidencing your English language skills for your Tier 2 visa From the 1st October 2019, doctors can use their English language certificate used for their GMC Registration for their Tier 2 visa application. This is a fantastic change to the Tier 2 visa process as previously, doctors would need to sit IELTS UKVI or obtain a UKNARIC certificate. Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor who has decided that the UK is for you, email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you in securing an NHS post and on your journey to the UK today. Are you a member of our Facebook Group? When you join IMG Advisor, you will join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs into the group every single day. We will also always be on hand to answer all your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 40 videos on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS! References Bluerock Healthcare Ltd. (2019). Nursing Agency Leeds | Healthcare Recruitment Leeds | Bluerock Healthcare. [online] Available at: https://www.bluerockcare.com/about/news-blog/361-nmc-language-tests-5-differences-between-ielts-oet [Accessed 30 Oct. 2019].

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