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Can I bring my pet with me to the UK?

By Gabrielle Richardson
September 18, 2019

You can enter or return to the UK with your pet cat or dog if it meets the following criteria: It has microchipped It has a pet passport or third-country official veterinary certificate It has been vaccinated against rabies If you are travelling from an ‘unlisted country’, it will need to have a blood test Must have had tapeworm treatment If you do not follow the above steps, then your pet may be put into quarantine for up to four months or get refused entry if you travelled by sea. You will be responsible for any fees or charges. Click here to find out if your country is listed or unlisted.   What documentation will I need to bring with me to the airport? Provide the correct certification with your import Enter the EU through a border inspection post (BIP), where checks will be carried out to make sure that the import conditions have been met You may also need: An import licence or authorization A commercial document EU Pet Passports If you are travelling from the EU, you will be able to obtain an EU Pet Passport which can be issued by an official veterinarian in the EU. So, if your pet is coming from a non-EU country then you will not be able to obtain an EU Pet Passport and you will need to follow the above-listed requirements and steps. The Five-Day Rule If you do decide to bring your pet to the UK with you, then you must travel to the UK within five days or their pet’s arrival in order to avoid being labelled as ‘commercial’ shipment. Whilst you can still important your pet as a commercial shipment, the health certificate will be different which means the timeline for completing the health certificate is much tighter and so, the import taxes will be higher. What if I want to leave the UK with my pet? If you decide to return back to your home country with your pet, you will need to follow the pet import requirements for your destination before you depart the UK. Depending on what country you are travelling to, you may need to obtain an export certificate from DEFRA. For further information on how to import or export your pet to the UK, visit the GOV. website. Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor and you need support with relocating to the UK, email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you in securing an NHS post and on your journey to the UK today. Join our Facebook Group Are you a member of our Facebook Group? When you join IMG Advisor, you will join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs into the group every single day. We will also always be on hand to answer all your relocation queries. YouTube Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 35 videos on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS! References Petrelocation.com. (2019). Bringing Dogs and Cats to the UK - A Simple Guide | PetRelocation. [online] Available at: https://www.petrelocation.com/blog/post/bringing-dogs-and-cats-to-the-uk-a-simple-guide [Accessed 18 Sep. 2019]. GOV.UK. (2019). Bringing your pet dog, cat or ferret to the UK. [online] Available at: https://www.gov.uk/take-pet-abroad [Accessed 18 Sep. 2019].

A snapshot of... Lancashire

By Gabrielle Richardson
September 16, 2019

Lancashire County is situated on the North West of England and is famous for its hills, coastal towns and busy urban city centres. The county was established in 1183 and it has a population of 1.460 million. It is home to Preston, Blackpool, Burnley, Blackburn, Morecambe and Ormskirk. The county is situated next to Manchester and Liverpool and so, it offers plenty of scope for commuters. Facts about Lancashire The first motorway in the UK was built around Preston and opened in 1958. Preston is the second biggest bus station in Europe and is now a Grade II listed building. Blackpool is the most popular seaside resort in the UK. The famous Blackpool illuminations have been on display since 1879. The free light show uses over a million bulbs and runs from early August until late November each year. Cost of living in Lancashire Accommodation One-bedroom apartment in the City Centre £516 a month One-bedroom apartment Outside of the City Centre £373 a month Three-bedroom apartment in the City Centre £825 a month Three-bedroom apartment Outside of the City Centre £612 a month Transportation 1L Petrol £1.26 One-way public transport ticket £1.90 Monthly public transport ticket £56.52 5-mile taxi journey £6.50 Entertainment Basic dinner out for two in a neighbourhood pub £21 Two tickets to the cinema £18 Two tickets to the theatre £74 Cappuccino £2.87 1 beer in the neighbourhood pub £3.54 One month of gym membership in business district £36 The time it takes to travel to other UK cities from Lancashire London – 2 hour 11 minutes Birmingham – 1 hour 40 minutes Manchester – 37 minutes Bristol – 3 hours 25 minutes Cardiff – 3 hours 39 minutes Leeds – 1 hour 50 minutes Edinburgh - 2 hours 33 minutes Education in Lancashire Lancashire is home to three universities: Lancaster University, University of Central Lancashire, Edge Hill University and the Lancashire Campus of the University of Cumbria. Lancashire University was ranked the 9th in the UK and the best in the North West in The Complete University Guide 2017 league table. The survey was based on student satisfaction, research quality and intensity, student-staff radio, good honours degrees achieved, graduate prospects and completion. The best things to do in Lancashire Visit Blackpool Pleasure Beach – one of England’s favourite holiday resorts, enjoyed by thousands of visitors every year for its sandy beach and attractions such as Blackpool Tower and Blackpool Sea Life Centre. Visit Morecame Bay Seaside Resort – Famous for its beautiful bay, water sports and entertainment, this area is one of the most important wildlife sites in Europe and the second largest bay in Britain – a haven for birds and marine life. Visit Lancaster Castle – As well as being a fortification, the Castle was also Europe’s longest-serving operational prison until its closure in March 2011. Visit the Forest of Bowland Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) – It will provide you with dramatic sky, open moorland, lowlands, dry stone walls and picturesque farms and villages. Relocation to Lancashire If you are an international doctor and you need support with relocating to Lancashire or any other UK location, email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you in securing an NHS post and on your journey to the UK today. Are you a member of our Facebook Group? When you join IMG Advisor, you will join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs into the group every single day. We will also always be on hand to answer all your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 35 videos on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS! References Numbeo.com. (2019). Cost of Living in Preston. [online] Available at: https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/in/Preston [Accessed 12 Sep. 2019]. Zoopla.co.uk. (2019). Moving to Lancashire - Zoopla. [online] Available at: https://www.zoopla.co.uk/discover/buying-area-guides/living-in-lancashire/#HKUsGJfIYxzzMv0t.97 [Accessed 12 Sep. 2019].

One English language test for your GMC and Tier 2 visa

By Gabrielle Richardson
September 12, 2019

Previously, as an international doctor relocating to the UK, you would have needed to evidence your English language skills at two stages of the relocation process. The first stage was for your GMC Registration. The GMC accepts the following English language tests: IELTS Academic IELTS Academic UKVI OET The second stage you would need to evidence your English language skills was for your Tier 2 Visa. The Home Office accepted the following: IELTS UKVI UKNARIC Certificate However, from the 1st October 2019, you will no longer need to sit a separate test for your Tier 2 visa or obtain a UKNARIC certificate – you can use your OET or IELTS Academic certificate. OET was accepted by the GMC nearly two years ago so, it is an absolute delight for doctors to now be able to sit one single test for both their GMC Registration and their Tier 2 visa application. The Home Office has announced: “The Home Office has also streamlined English language testing ensuring that doctors, dentists, nurses and midwives who have already passed an English language test accepted by the relevant professional body, do not have to sit another test before entry to the UK on a Tier 2 visa. This change will make sure that hospitals and medical practices across the country will be able to access the staff they need more quickly.”  Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor and you need support with relocating to the UK and joining the NHS, email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you on your journey to the UK today. Are you a member of our Facebook Group? When you join IMG Advisor, you will join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs into the group every single day. We will also always be on hand to answer all your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 35 videos on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS! References Dongaonkar, K., Coleman, M. and Coleman, M. (2019). Only one test now required for both registration and visa purposes | OET. [online] OET - Occupational English Test. Available at: https://www.occupationalenglishtest.org/only-one-test-now-required-for-both-uk-registration-and-visa-purposes/ [Accessed 12 Sep. 2019]. GOV.UK. (2019). Expansion of the shortage of occupation list. [online] Available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/expansion-of-the-shortage-of-occupation-list [Accessed 12 Sep. 2019].

How to apply for Indefinite Leave to Remain

By Gabrielle Richardson
September 11, 2019

What is Indefinite Leave to Remain? ILR will grant you the right to live and work in the UK free from immigration restrictions. To apply for ILR, you will need to submit a series of documents and evidence supporting your eligibility to the Home Office. The application process can be a complex one and so it is important you have all the required documentation before applying to prevent you from losing a fee. Step 1: Check your eligibility As a doctor working in the UK, you will be on a Tier 2 (General) visa or a Tier 2 dependent visa, this means you will need to have lived in the UK for 5 years before you can apply. You should note that if you have had excessive absences from the UK then you may be un-eligible to apply. You should check this information with a specialist immigration lawyer. In addition to your residence, you will also need to demonstrate that you have sufficient knowledge of language and life in the UK. This means that you will need to pass the Life in the UK test and provide evidence of a UK degree that was taught or researched in English or obtain an approved English speaking and listening qualification. Step 2: Compile your supporting documentation Passport BRP Police registration certificate where you have been required to register with the police after arriving in the UK Evidence of your finances Your pass certificate for the life in the UK test Your pass certificate for your English language qualification OR evidence of your degree taught in English Evidence of any absences from the UK, for example a letter from your HR department confirming your annual leave Any other supporting evidence relevant to your specific visa category Two coloured passport photographs You should note that all documents should be originals. Step 3: Pay your fee A single ILR application fee is £2389. If you opt for the premium service, it will cost you £2999. Please note, you will also need to pay for the Life in the UK test which costs £50 and you must book your test online at least 3 days in advance of applying for ILR. There is also a fee of £19.20 to enrol your biometric information at a Post Office branch or UK Visa and Citizenship Application Service centre. Step 4: Submit your biometric information After you have made your application you will be asked to provide your fingerprint, a digital photo of your face and your signature. This is known as your biometric information. Your permit will then automatically be issued to you. Your permit will allow you to confirm your right to work or study in the UK and confirm your right to any public services or benefits you are entitled to. When can I apply for ILR? Applications for ILR are extremely sensitive, it is vital you apply before your current leave expires and whilst you are still in the UK. If your application is made 28 days before the end of your current leave it may be refused. You will then need to re-submit a second application and make a second fee. Do not stay beyond the expiry of your visa or you will be at risk of the removal from the UK, refusal of further leave or even criminal prosecution. What is the length of the ILR processing time? It can take up to 6 months to be informed if your application has been successful, so, it is important to be patient. If you would prefer to have the decision made more quickly, you can apply for the premium service. If you are an international doctor planning to apply for ILR, we highly recommend contacting an immigration lawyer to provide you with guidance and support. Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor and you need support with relocating to the UK and joining the NHS, email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you on your journey to the UK today. Are you a member of our Facebook Group? When you join IMG Advisor, you will join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs into the group every single day. We will also always be on hand to answer all your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 35 videos on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS! References Morris, A. (2019). How to Apply for Indefinite Leave to Remain in the UK - DavidsonMorris - Immigration Solicitors. [online] DavidsonMorris - Immigration Solicitors. Available at: https://www.davidsonmorris.com/apply-for-indefinite-

Bringing goods into the UK: Customs Allowances

By Gabrielle Richardson
September 09, 2019

Each country has a duty to protect its citizens from drugs, firearms and other harmful goods and to stop smugglers evading taxes. Therefore, when you travel to the UK you may need to declare your goods and cash. What happens when I arrive in the UK? When you arrive at a UK airport, it is likely you will have to go through passport control via one of the three routes: Blue Route This is for people who have travelled within the EU with no banned or restricted goods Green Route This is for people who have travelled from outside of the EU with goods that do not go over your allowances And you do not possess any banned or restricted goods Red Route You must use the red channel if you have goods or cash to declare, Have commercial goods Or you are not sure about what you need to declare What countries are in the EU? Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Luthuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portgul, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden and the United Kingdom. Although Gibraltar is part of the EU, it is outside the Community Customs territory. The customs allowances for outside the EU therefore apply. I am travelling from the EU, what goods can I bring with me? You can bring an unlimited amount of most goods into the UK, as long as they are for your own consumption or gifts to give to others. If you intend to sell any goods, then this is considered as commercial use. If you are bringing in alcohol or tobacco goods and UK Border Control have reason to suspect they may be for a commercial purpose, an officer may ask you questions and make checks. For example: The type and quantity of goods you have bought Why you have bought them How you paid for them How often you travel How much you normally smoke or drink Any other relevant circumstances If you are travelling from the EU, you may bring in any meat, dairy or any other animal products. You may also bring in fruit, vegetables or plant products. Click here for further information. I am travelling from outside of the EU, what goods can I bring with me? When travelling from outside of the EU, you can bring a certain limit of goods into the UK without paying duty or tax. These goods must be for your own use or gifts. If you intend to sell any goods, then this is considered as commercial use. Allowance: Alcohol 1L of spirits or 2L of fortified wine, sparkling wine or any other alcoholic beverage Tobacco 200 cigarettes or 100 cigarillos or 50 cigars or 250g of tobacco Other goods Most travellers can bring other goods into the UK worth up to £390 (e.g. perfume and electrical goods) without paying duty or tax in the UK. If you bring in goods worth more than your allowance, you must pay duty and/or tax on the full value, not just the value above the allowance. You cannot bring in any meat, honey or dairy products into the UK from a non-EU country. How much cash can I bring with me to the UK? If you are carrying the equivalent to 10,000 euros or more then you must declare it when you enter the UK from a county outside of the EU. You will need to complete a cash declaration form at the airport. What if I go over my goods allowance? If you over your allowance, you must pay Customs Duty on anything you bring above your allowance. The current rate is 2.5% for goods worth up to £630. Please note, this information is taken from UK Border Control, for more detailed information please contact them on: 0300 200 3700 (UK) +44 2920 501 261 (outside the UK) Lines are open Monday to Friday, 8am to 6pm. Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor and you need support with relocating to the UK and joining the NHS, email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you on your journey to the UK today. Are you a member of our Facebook Group? When you join IMG Advisor, you will join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs into the group every single day. We will also always be on hand to answer all your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 35 videos on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS! References GOV.UK. (2019). Bringing goods into the UK. [online] Available at: https://www.gov.uk/duty-free-goods/arrivals-from-outside-the-eu [Accessed 9 Sep. 2019]. Assets.publishing.service.gov.uk. (2019). [online] Available at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/668106/Travelling_to_the_UK-_update.pdf [Accessed 9 Sep. 2019].

A snapshot of.... York

By Gabrielle Richardson
September 06, 2019

York is one of the oldest cities in the UK with over two thousand years of heritage and is famous for its cobbled Shambles, attracting tourists from all over the world. The city offers modern shops, chains and independent shops and cafés. Facts about York 1. York is situated in Yorkshire and it is the largest county in the UK 2. York and its boarders are considered to be one of the greenest in England 3. York is the UK’s home of chocolate. Where other Northern centres made their wealth from wool, cotton and steel, York made its from chocolate 4. Home to the largest National Railway Museum in the UK 5. York is home to the largest food and drink festival in the UK Cost of living in York York provides great value for money when living in the city. The average food bills, petrol and utilities are on the lower end of the scale. However, housing can be slightly more expensive compared to other areas in the North of England. Accommodation One-bedroom apartment in the City Centre £730 One-bedroom apartment Outside of the City Centre £616 Three-bedroom apartment in the City Centre £1,200 Three-bedroom apartment outside of the City Centre £962.50 Transportation 1L of Petrol £1.25 One-way public transport £2.45 Monthly public transport ticket £45 Taxi trip, 5 miles £8 Entertainment Basic dinner out for two in a neighbourhood pub Basic dinner out for two in a neighbourhood pub £28 Two tickets to the cinema £188 Two tickets to the theatre £79 Cappuccino £2.83 One beer in a neighbourhood pub £4.15 One month of gym membership in a business district £35 The time it takes to travel from York to other UK Cities London King Cross – 1 hour 51 minutes Birmingham – 1 hour 52 minutes Manchester – 1 hour 15 minutes Bristol – 3 hours 34 minutes Cardiff – 4 hours 14 minutes Leeds – 23 minutes Edinburgh – 2 hours 26 minutes Education in Kent York provides its residents with excellent schools. If you would like your child to attend boarding school, then St. Peter’s School is a brilliant choice due to its impeccable reputation and first-class facilities. Fulford School is one of the best state schools in the country and it has produced some of the best GCSE and A Level results in the country. The best things to do in York 1. Walk the Walls - The centre of York is surrounded by a beautiful 3.4km circuit of medieval stone walls, the best-preserved city walls in England. Walking along the walls is the best way to view and get a sense of the city. It takes two hours to walk the circuit. 2. Visit Clifford’s Tower – The Tower was built by William the Conqueror and it is the last remaining structure of York Castle. It sits on a small hill overlooking the entire city. 3. Visit the Museums – The York Castle Museum has hundreds of years of York’s history, all under one room. The Yorkshire Museum also has some of the finest archaeological and geological collections in Europe. 4. Visit the York Minister – This is the largest medieval cathedral in Northern Europe and it is considered to be one of the world’s most beautiful Gothic buildings. It took over 250 years to build and the craftsmanship is absolutely beautiful. Relocation to York If you are an international doctor planning to relocate to the UK and join the NHS, email your CV to [email protected] and we will be in touch regarding current opportunities. Join our Facebook Group IMG Advisor When you join, you will have access to frequent relocation blog posts, the opportunity to ask questions and receive professional guidance and the chance to meet other IMGs.

Childcare Options within the UK

By Gabrielle Richardson
September 04, 2019

Relocating to the UK, can be a long and complex process, especially when you have children. In this guide, we take you through the different childcare options available in the UK to help you think about which option suits your family’s needs and budget. A Childminder A childminder is an individual registered to look after children in their own home. When speaking with a childminder, check they are registered with one of the following: Ofsted (England Care Inspectorate (Scotland) Care and Social Services Inspectorate (Wales) Health and Social Services Trust (Northern Ireland) A childminder is self-employed, so, you will not need to worry about paying their tax or national insurance contributions. Most childminders work flexible hours, they can pick or drop your children off to school or playgroup and ensure they get breakfast/lunch/dinner. Unfortunately, if your childminder is unwell or is on holiday, you will need to make alternative arrangements. For a child under two, 25 hours of childcare will cost you an average of £221 a week. However, this price will increase the closer you get to London. Day Nurseries If your child is between ages six weeks and five years, they can attend a day nursery. Each nursery differs and they may be run privately or by local authorities. Day nurseries are typically open weekdays from 8am to 6pm and are typically, more expensive than childminders. For a child under two, the cost of 50 hours of childcare at a day nursery will cost you £242 per week. This price will inflate the closer you get to London. A Nanny If you do not think the above two options work for your family, you may want to consider getting a Nanny. A Nanny is someone who will look after your child in the comfort of your own home. You can have a daily nanny, a live-in nanny or a part-time nanny. The advantage of a nanny is that your child will be cared for in an environment they are comfortable with. However, a disadvantage is that you will be their employer, so, you will be responsible for paying their income tax and national insurance contributions. If your nanny earns over £192 a week (£833 a month) before tax, then you will also need to pay their pension. A full-time nanny will cost you around £400-750 a week including their tax and national insurance contributions. Au Pair An Au Pair is an individual who lives with you and learns the local language and culture whilst providing around 30 hours childcare and help around the family home. An Au Pair is paid ‘pocket money’ of around £70-85 per week plus a room and food. This option is much lower than other childcare options. Au Pair’s are treated like a member of the family and so, you will not need to pay their tax or national insurance contributions. Playgroup or Pre-School If your child is aged between three and five years old, you may want them to attend playgroup. A playgroup typically offers three-hour morning or afternoon sessions during school term-term. Playgroup can be a low-cost option if you just need care for a couple of hours each day. Unfortunately, you will need to find alternative childcare during the school holidays and or the rest of the working day. For a three-hour session, it will cost you around £5-15 depending on where you live in the UK. Nursery School If your child is three to five years old, then they can also attend nursery school. Often there is a nursery attached to a primary school. A nursery school will be open during school hours in term time and your child will be taught by qualified teachers. If the nursery is attached to a primary school, it will be free for your child to attend. After School Club If your child is older than five and you work after school hours, you may want to consider sending them to an after-school club. The average cost of this in the UK is £57 a week which is nearly £2,200 a year during term time. Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor and you need support with relocating to the UK and joining the NHS, email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you on your journey to the UK today. Are you a member of our Facebook Group? When you join IMG Advisor, you will join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs into the group every single day. We will also always be on hand to answer all your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 35 videos on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS! References Moneyadviceservice.org.uk. (2019). Childcare options. [online] Available at: https://www.moneyadviceservice.org.uk/en/articles/childcare-options [Accessed 2 Sep. 2019]. Moneyadviceservice.org.uk. (2019). Average childcare costs. [online] Available at: https://www.moneyadviceservice.org.uk/en/articles/childcare-costs [Accessed 2 Sep. 2019].

How to write a good medical CV

By Gabrielle Richardson
September 02, 2019

Although your medical experience is very important when it comes to applying for NHS jobs, it is also important that your experience is presented in a clear, concise yet informative manner. In this post, we share how to properly organise your CV and some very important CV don’ts. How long should my CV be? The length of a CV is always a combative issue. Typically, business CV’s are recommended to not be longer than 1-2 pages in length. However, with a medicine CV, this is not possible. On average, a Consultant’s CV for a medical specialty will be approximately 10 pages long, whilst for a surgical specialty it may go on for as long as is needed due to the number of procedures they will need to list. For a Middle Grade or Junior Medical CV, there are not a specific number of pages that are ‘right’, however, we always advise doctors to think – the more detail the better. That being said, the purpose of your CV is to get you short-listed for an interview, so it should always be presented in a well-ordered and concise fashion. What font should I use? It is important to always use a professional and small font, but large enough to read with ease. Examples of such fonts include Arial Size 10, Calibri Size 11 or Times New Roman Size 11. You should bold and space your headings so the separation between the different sections is evident. How should I order my CV? Generally speaking, we suggest the following: Personal details Keep this section as simple as possible. List your name, letters/qualifications (for a good first impression), your GMC Registration number, address, telephone number and your email address. Personal profile Look at the job specification and ensure your personal profile matches the job description requirements. Qualifications List your qualifications in reverse-chronological order. Relevant prizes and awards Current appointment Clinical experience List all of your duties, responsibilities, how big the hospital was, management within that role and any procedures performed (supervised and unsupervised). Audits Management experience Teaching experience Research experience Publications Presentations Personal interests References You should not list more than three, unless otherwise requested. Provide their name, job title, correspondence address, telephone number, fax number and email address You should always tailor your CV for the post you are applying to, especially as a junior doctor. For example, if you are applying for a post in Surgery, list all of your surgical experience at the beginning of your clinical experience section rather than starting with your Paediatric experience. Remember to provide as much detail as possible for each appointment. List all your duties, responsibilities and procedures performed. CV Don’ts Do not include any irrelevant information. When typing up your CV, ask yourself the question “Will it help me get the role?” If the answer is no, take it out. Do not experiment with size - keep your font the same size throughout the entirety of your CV, except your headings which should be just one size larger than the normal text. Do not include any salary information or expectations – leave this for negotiation after you have successfully secured the post Do not use crazy colours, fonts or photographs Please contact us at [email protected] for a copy of an example CV. If you are an international doctor and you need support with relocating to the UK and joining the NHS, email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you on your journey to the UK today. Are you a member of our Facebook Group? When you join IMG Advisor, you will join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs into the group every single day. We will also always be on hand to answer your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 35 videos on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS! References Medical-interviews.co.uk. (2019). Medical CV Writing Tips – Get CV Tips on Writing a Successful CV for Medical Interview. [online] Available at: https://www.medical-interviews.co.uk/topic/medical-consultant-cv-tips [Accessed 2 Sep. 2019].

Overview of MRCOG Part 2

By Gabrielle Richardson
August 30, 2019

If you are an international Obs and Gynae Doctor who wants to relocate to the UK and join the NHS, you will need full MRCOG to work at ST33+ level. MRCOG consists of MRCOG Part 1, MRCOG Part 2 and MRCOG Part 3. You will also need to pass IELTS or OET to evidence your English language skills. In today’s blog post, we provide you with an overview of MRCOG Part 2. The Cost Country Fee UK and Republic of Ireland £474 Band A £550 Band B £475 Band C £380 Click here to find out what band your country falls under. The Format MRCOG Part 2 is a written examination. There are two papers, Paper 1 and Paper 2.   Paper 1 The duration of this exam is three-hours. There will be 50 single-best answer questions and 50 extended-matching questions. The Royal College suggests that you spend 70 minutes on the single-best answers and 110 minutes on the extended-matching questions. You will have an hour’s lunch break before you sit Paper 2. Paper 2 The second paper is also three-hours in duration and mirrors the exact format as Paper 1. What will the exam text me on? It is important to note that there is an overlap between modules and not all subjects are relevant to a particular module. You will be tested on the following modules: clinical skills, teaching appraisal and assessment, information technology, clinical governance and research, core surgical skills, postoperative care, surgical procedures, antenatal care, maternal medicine, management of labour, management of delivery, postpartum problems, gynaecological problems, subfertility, sexual and reproductive health, early pregnancy care, gynaecological oncology, urogynaecology and pelvic floor problems Click here to access the full MRCOG blueprint. Modules 4 and 19 in the blueprint are not tested in MRCOG Part 2. Click here to have a copy of the exam regulations. Revision Resources Books Part 2 MRCOG: 500 extended matching questions and single-best answers Single Best Answers for MRCOG Part 2 Notes for MRCOG Part 2: A successful candidates revision notes Extended Matching Questions for MRCOG Part 2 Past Papers BMJ Past Papers RCOG Past Papers Pass MRCOG E Learning RCOG E-Learning Tutorials YouTube Dr Abeer F.G. Good luck with your studies from the BDI Resourcing team! If you are an Obs and Gynae with MRCOG and you need support with relocating to the UK and joining the NHS, email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you on your journey to the UK today. Are you a member of our Facebook Group? When you join IMG Advisor, you will join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs into the group every single day. We will also always be on hand to answer your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 35 videos on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS! References Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists. (2019). Part 2 MRCOG: format. [online] Available at: https://www.rcog.org.uk/en/careers-training/mrcog-exams/part-2-mrcog/format/ [Accessed 30 Aug. 2019]. Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists. (2019). Part 2 MRCOG: syllabus. [online] Available at: https://www.rcog.org.uk/en/careers-training/mrcog-exams/part-2

Overview of EDAIC Part 1

By Gabrielle Richardson
August 28, 2019

The European Diploma in Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care (EDAIC) exam is a two-part exam covering the relevant basic sciences and clinical subjects for a Specialist Anaesthetist. By obtaining full EDAIC and a pass in IELTS/OET, you will be eligible to take up an ST3+ post within the NHS. In this blog post, we provide you with an overview of EDAIC Part 1. The Cost  Part 1 costs £292 and the exam is held annually in late September or early October. Please click here for a list of available test centres. How much experience do I need to sit EDAIC Part 1? The European Society of Anaesthesiology state that there are no specific requirements with regards to your level of training. However, the level of knowledge they suggest you have acquired for the exam is appropriate to that of a 4th year trainee with Anaesthetics. What languages can EDAIC Part 1 be sat in? The exam can be taken in English, German, French, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Polish, Hungarian, Portuguese, Turkish or Romanian. An English language copy will always be provided on top of the selected language so that you can refer to the original version if you wish to. What is the format of EDAIC Part 1? The exam consists of two multiple-choice question papers, each with 60 multiple-choice questions. Paper A will cover the basic science of medicine and Paper B will test your knowledge on Clinical Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine. Paper A – Basic Science The exam consists of 60 multiple-choice questions. Physiology (20 MCQ’s), Pharmacology (20 MCQ’s) and Physics, Clinical Measurement and Statistics (20 MCQ’s). Paper B – Clinical Practice The exam consists of 60 multiple-choice questions. General Anaesthesia, Special Anaesthetic Techniques, Local/Regional Anaesthesia, Intensive Care Medicine, Internal Medicine and Emergency Medicine. You will be awarded a mark for each correct answer. There will be no negative marking if answered incorrectly or if the question is left blank. Therefore, the society requests that you ensure you answer all questions. Please click here for a copy of the examination regulations. Revision Resources Example Questions ESA Past Paper ESA Sample Questions Revision Course The Basic Sciences Anaesthetic Course (BSAC). A three-day course, click here to book. The ESA E-Learning Site Click here to join the academy. Good luck with your studies from the BDI Resourcing team! If you are an Anaesthetist with EDAIC, EDIC or FRCA and you need support with relocating to the UK and joining the NHS, email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you on your journey to the UK today. Are you a member of our Facebook Group? When you join IMG Advisor, you will join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs into the group every single day. We will also always be on hand to answer your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 35 videos on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS! References ESA. (2019). European Diploma in Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care. [online] Available at: https://www.esahq.org/education/edaic/about [Accessed 28 Aug. 2019]. ESA. (2019). How to prepare for EDAIC. [online] Available at: https://www.esahq.org/~/media/ESA/Files/EDUCATION/EDAIC%20Part%20II/How%20to%20prepare%20for%20the%20EDAIC.ashx [Accessed 28 Aug. 2019].

Q&A with Dr Segs Olusanya, ST5 Intensive Care Medicine

By Gabrielle Richardson
August 23, 2019

Introduction 1. What is your name, speciality, grade and what hospital do you work at? Hi - My full name is Olusegun Olusanya. I am an ST5 in Intensive Care Medicine, working at St Bartholomew’s Hospital in London. 2. What country did you relocate from? I moved from Nigeria in 1995. 3. Would you share with us your personal mission as a doctor? To be a good one! In my mind this means being a kind, compassionate human being. 4. At what point in your career did you decide you wanted to relocate to the UK? What were your motivations for wanting to do so? I didn’t really decide to relocate myself- it was a family decision. Most of my family had attended university overseas; it was just my turn! 5. How did you find studying for medicine in the UK? Honestly? Strange. I went to Southampton University; it was wonderful studying near the coast. As I grew up near a coast myself, it probably reminded me of home. I found medical school a bit like bootcamp- you had to learn to speak, think and act in a certain way that was far removed from my normal life. I’m still not 100% acclimatised to medical culture, and may well never be. I found ways to cope- humour being top. I had excellent support from friends and family while studying, and had lots of opportunities to travel and do fun things. I spent my non-medical time learning skills – in particular music, martial arts, and gymnastics. The Relocation Process 6. How long did it take you to relocate, how difficult did you find the process, and do you recommend it to other IMGs? As I started off in the UK doing A levels first, then applying to medical school, I don’t think my process was as onerous as others. The big challenge was the high competition ratio for international medical school places- that’s not something to be taken lightly, and many people I know applying then were disappointed. Acclimatisation was easy in some respects – Nigeria is a former English colony, English is our national language, and I had visited the UK many times before; at the same time there were some culture shocks…particularly the drinking culture as an undergraduate. While I can understand it now, I never got into it. 7. Is there anything you would have liked to have known before deciding to relocate? And now once you live in the UK? How rare black people are in medicine, especially in certain specialties. I may have moved to America instead, if I had known how few black people there are at the top; I think the glass ceiling still exists over there mind. How long training would be. BREXIT. Cricket and rugby rules (it allows you to make great small talk). Thoughts on the UK 8. For you, what are the key benefits of living in the UK? Healthcare. I don’t have to worry about being bankrupt for the sake of getting good healthcare. Safety. I can walk around at night without feeling like I’m going to get robbed. Education. Schools are good. 9. How do you feel you settled in your chosen location within the UK? We live in a nice neighbourhood surrounded by nice people. There have been some challenges in terms of making local friends, as many of our friends aren’t local. Most of our family is still in Nigeria, and that Is a struggle at times. We miss them a lot. 10. If you relocated with family, how did they settle into the UK? I didn’t…. The NHS 11. What was your experience working within FY1 and FY2? Do you have any advice for other IMGs due to start FY2 in the UK? I really enjoyed my housejobs (I was the last of the “old style”.) They are a chance to get experience in a very supported environment. My advice to IMGs would be to remember that medicine is a team sport. Everyone- from the cleaner to the ward sister to the physio- has a role that is just as important as yours. If you aim to function as part of a team, rather than “the doctor”, you will achieve much. 12. How did you feel on your first day of working within the NHS, your first week, month and then how do you feel now compared to when you first started? On my first day I felt thrilled and terrified to be part of this amazing complex machine. I am a little bit more jaded than I was back in 2004, but that feeling mostly remains. 13. How would you describe the support you received from your hospital after starting your new position? It was… variable. There were wonderful aspects- the registrars and SHOs were very nice, I had some lovely bosses, and the nursing staff were great. On the other hand, I did witness- and receive- some bullying, and the paperwork was at times overwhelming. I think one should be prepared to deal with all kinds of people, and be prepared for a system that can be very inflexible at time. 14. What is your opinion on the NHS? Working within it and as a patient receiving care? The NHS is one of the most amazing things that has ever been invented. It is stretched beyond imagining yet still delivers care to those who need it. 15. If you are in a training post, how did you find the application process? Were you selected on your first application? What are your thoughts? Applications are very sterile now. It’s all via an automated system that allocates “points” based on achievements on your CV. This is a lot more fair than the old ways, of being based on “who you knew”. The main thing here is that if you know what your job requires, you can steer your CV in that direction early. One could argue that this means that CV points are easy to “game”… Intensive Care Medicine 16. What is a typical day when working within Intensive Care? ST5? The intensive care unit is where all the sickest patients in the hospital are. They are usually on some kind of support (ventilation, inotropes, renal replacement, etc). You start bright and early with a handover from the night team. Your morning is spent doing a ward round; then your afternoon is full of meetings (family, microbiology, outside consults) and procedures such as central lines or chest drains. You also get outside consult requests for sick patients, and in some hospitals you are part of the cardiac arrest team. The family meetings are really important, and can be very challenging, as their loved ones are very sick. About a quarter of patients we admit will die, and this can be hard to deal with. As an ST5 I am on the “senior” tier of registrars, so I spend some of my time supervising my junior colleagues. 17. Do you have any advice for any other junior doctors who want to pursue a career in Intensive Care Medicine or any advice for junior doctors looking to secure an NHS post in general? Learn compassion- both to yourself and others. It is by far the most important quality that will help both you and your patients. Stay humble. Stay open. Do not sacrifice your family for your career. Your career will end, your family will not. The Future 18. What are your hopes and plans for the future? To be a good doctor for as long as I can. To be surrounded by people I love, and who love me in return. To bring out the best in those people around me. If you are an international doctor who needs support relocating to the UK and joining the NHS, send your CV to [email protected] and we can support you on your journey today.  

Overview of MRCOG Part 1

By Gabrielle Richardson
August 21, 2019

To work at ST3+ level within Obstetrics and Gynaecology, you will need to obtain full MRCOG and a pass in IELTS or OET to evidence your English language skills. This will make you eligible for full GMC Registration. MRCOG is an internationally respected gold standard quali­fication, by the Royal College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. The exam is a three-part assessment, the first two exams are written and the third exam is an Objective Structured Clinical Examination OSCE). In today’s post, we provide you with an overview of MRCOG Part 1 and some useful revision resources to aid your studies. If you want to be entered onto the UK Specialist Register, you will be permitted no more than 6 attempts at the MRCOG Part 1 exam. There will be no limit on your attempts if you do not want to get onto the Specialist Register. Click here to book your MRCOG Part 1 exam. How much does MRCOG Part 1 cost? Fees are banded using the international membership subscription country bandings. From 1 January 2018, the Royal College introduced an additional administration charge of £10 for those who do not pay their exam fees online. E.g. pay over the phone, by cheque or bank draft. If you pay online, you will not be charged an additional £10. Country Fee UK and Republic of Ireland £474 Band A £550 Band B £475 Band C £380 Click here to find out what band your country falls in. Examination Format MRCOG Part 1 is a written examination. There are two exam papers, each consisting of 100 single best answer questions. Each paper counts for 50% of the mark. There is no minimum score required for each paper as the outcome is determined by your overall (combined) mark. Paper 1 1.5 hours (150 minutes) 100 single best answer questions Lunch Break Paper 2 2.5 hours (150 minutes) 100 single best answer questions Examination Syllabus MRCOG Part 1 covers the basic and applied sciences relevant to the clinic practice of Obs and Gynae. You will be tested on your clinical skills, information technology, clinical governance and research, core surgical skills, postoperative care, surgical procedures, antenatal care, maternal medicine, management of labour, management of delivery, postpartum problems, gynaecological problems, subfertility, sexual and reproductive health, early pregnancy care, gynaecological oncology, urogynaecology and pelvic floor problems Click here for a full blue print. Where can I sit MRCOG Part 1? London, Manchester, Belfast, Glasgow, Bangladesh, Cairo, Hong Kong, Kolkata, Mumbai, Indonesia, Jordan, Karachi, Malaysia, Riyadh, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Dubai, Jamaica. If you have any questions about exactly where the test centre is, contact the Royal College here - [email protected] or call us on +44 20 7772 6210. Revision Resources MRCOG Part 1 MRCOG Part 1: Your Essential Revision Guide Revision Notes for the MRCOG Part 1 MRCOG Part 1, 400 SBA Question Bank Multiple Choice Questions for MRCOG Part 1 Royal College Question Bank Watch our YouTube video on how to successfully obtain an Obs and Gynae Speciality Training post. Make sure to subsribe! We post a new video every single week. Relocation to the UK If you are a senior international doctor who is looking to secure an NHS post, email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you on your journey to the UK. Join our Facebook Group Are you a member of IMG Advisor? We publish frequent blog posts relating to relocating to the UK and we will provide you with professional guidance and support. References Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists. (2019). Part 1 MRCOG: format. [online] Available at: https://www.rcog.org.uk/en/careers-training/mrcog-exams/part-1-mrcog/format/ [Accessed 21 Aug. 2019]. Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists. (2019). Part 1 MRCOG: syllabus. [online] Available at: https://www.rcog.org.uk/en/careers-training/mrcog-exams/part-1-mrcog/syllabus/ [Accessed 21 Aug. 2019]. Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists. (2019). Part 1 MRCOG: revision resources. [online] Available at: https://www.rcog.org.uk/en/careers-training/mrcog-exams/part-1-mrcog/revision-resources/ [Accessed 21 Aug. 2019].

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