Latest Blog

Q&A with Dr Udare and Dr Joshi, International Radiologists

By Gabrielle Richardson
March 18, 2019

Introduction What is your name, Name: Dr Amar (AU) Speciality: Radiology, Body Imaging. Grade: Fellow in Body Imaging at the Ottawa General Hospital, Canada. Founder, Editor and Developer of RadioGyan.com Name: Dr Saurabh Joshi (SJ) Speciality: Interventional Radiologist Grade: Assistant Professor at present in Lokmanya Tilak Municipal Medical College and General Hospital (A government medical school with 1900 bedded hospital) Would you share with us your personal mission as a doctor? AU: To provide the best possible service to patients. SJ: To treat disease with minimal access Do you have any plans to relocate to the UK and what are your motivations for wanting to do so? AU: Yes. The work culture and teaching environment in the UK are unparalleled. SJ:  Yes, to pursue radiology for at least short term. Why did you choose to specialise in Radiology? AU: As a radiologist one needs to be a jack of all trades (to start off) and master of some (a few years down the line)! With the advanced imaging techniques available today, radiologists play a crucial role in patient management. Clinical practice has evolved so much over time and clinicians now have specific questions for radiologists to decide management. Innovations in interventional radiology have revolutionised patient management for a number of disease processes.  SJ: It is an exciting and ever evolving branch of medicine with close contact with technology FRCR How long did it take you to complete FRCR? Three and a half years Do you have any advice for other doctors who are currently studying for FRCR? If you have acquired your basic radiology qualification i.e. MD/DNB  and you are strong in then FRCR is more about understanding the concepts and techniques of exam per rather than studying radiology again. I have documented my preparation strategy on the blog for reference. In your view, what are the key benefits of obtaining FRCR? 1. Additional qualification – an international one for Indian radiologists 2. While studying for FRCR, good exposure to cases and x-rays. 3. Opens additional avenues for career advancements. What are the key revision resources for studying FRCR? A) FRCR books B) Rapid sets - FRCRtutorials, FRCRscholar, FRCRacademy etc. C) Aunt Minnie Do you have any advice for doctors who are struggling to secure a seat in their 2b exam? Do you think it is easier to secure a seat in countries such as Hong Kong over the UK? No experience as I had attempted 2b in the UK only and had no plan to attempt in Hong Kong. What is RadioGyan? Radio = Radiology Gyan (Sanskrit) = Knowledge. RadioGyan.com is a free educational website for radiology residents and healthcare professionals. We have a host of resources for residents and practicing radiologists. What inspired you to start your website RadioGyan? AU: As a radiology resident was always on the look for useful radiology resources. By the time I had finished my residency and fellowship, I had collected a large number of cases and online resources. A lot of residents are not aware of these excellent resources available online, most of which are free. The purpose of starting the website was to make residents and radiologists aware of these resources. As our tagline says, we intend to make Radiology as easy as possible. Apart from Radiology, I love technology and that helps me work on the website as well. What does your blog offer? The blog consists of collections of online resources and original articles, radiology cases and videos. Our anatomy page has -to-toe anatomy modules for all imaging modalities. The recommended books page has an extensive list of general and speciality books. We have a large collection of radiology cases (termed as spotters/ rapids), . We have introduced pages listing upcoming radiology conferences  and radiology jobs. Our cases and articles are different from other radiology websites as we try to write detailed articles which are more focussed on radiology relevant to patient management. We also have guides for residents to help prepare for various exams, including one for the FRCR exam. The Future What are your hopes and plans for the future? SJ: To further pursue in Interventional Radiology To guide students in Radiology and more specifically – radiology AU:  I intend to continue working on the website and making it more useful to radiology residents and practitioners. On a personal work front I intend to work at a tertiary radiology department once I finish my fellowship.          IMG Advisor  Are you a member of our Facebook Group? By joining you will have access to frequent relocation blog posts, the opportunity to ask questions and receive professional support and the chance to meet other IMGs.  Support Relocating to the UK  If you are an IMG looking to secure your first NHS post and need some help, email your CV to [email protected] and our Radiology Specialist Luke will be in touch.             

A snapshot of...Oxford

By Gabrielle Richardson
March 15, 2019

Oxford is located in what is known as the Heart of England and home to the world-renowned, University of Oxford. The city is found in the county of Oxfordshire, located just 50 miles to the North-West of London and it is a city full of history and heritage, exquisite architecture and magnificent museums. Approximately, there are 154,000 people living within Oxford with a fairly young demographic because of its large student population. Oxford has an excellent tourist trade due to its historic architecture – attracting over nine million people per year. In fact, Oxford is the seventh most visited city in the UK. Facts about Oxford 1. Did you know that The University of Oxford is roughly 923 years old, making it the second oldest University in the world. It is beaten in age by the University of Bologna which is around 931 years old. However, in terms of rankings, it has been ranked first in the world in the Times Higher Education World University Rankings for 2017, 2018 and 2019. 2 Oxford has more published authors per square mile than anywhere else in the world! Famous authors include JRR Tolkien (The Lord of the Rings), Lewis Carroll (Alice in Wonderland) and CS Lewis (The Chronicles of Narnia). ­­Average Monthly Living Expenses Housing One bedroom flat in City Centre £850+ One bedroom flat outside of the City Centre £650+ Three bedroom flat in the City Centre £1500+ Three bedroom flat outside of the City Centre £1250+ Internet 8Mbps (one month) £25   Tips on how to save money on accommodation in Oxford 1. Share a flat or a house – Oxford has a large selection of property to choose from. With a house share, you will have your own room and typically the bathroom and kitchen will be shared with other people. Visit Oxford’s SpareRoom, Easy Room Mate or Gumtree for a look at what is currently available on the property market. 2. Choose your area carefully – Botley and Cuttesloew are family friendly areas, easily accessible to the city centre by bus or car. East Oxford is ethnically diverse and has a vibrant arts and culture scene. Grandpont and Summertown are upmarket areas which are often popular with professionals, academics, London commuters and families who want access to excellent schools in the area. Entertainment Basic dinner out for two in a neighbourhood pub £34 Two tickets to the movies £21 Two tickets to the theatre (best seats) £87 Cappuccino £2.66 A pint of beer in a neighbourhood pub £4.24 One month of gym membership in a business district £40   Transportation 1L of petrol £1.25 Monthly bus ticket £54 Taxi trip on a business day, 5 miles £25 Travelling to other UK cities from Oxford via Train London Marylebone – 1 hour 5 minutes Birmingham New Street – 1 hour 3 minutes Manchester Piccadilly – 2 hours 44 minutes Bristol Temple Meads – 1 hour 36 minutes Cardiff Central – 1 hour 45 minutes Leeds – 3 hours 21 minutes Edinburgh – 5 hours 55 minutes Where is Oxford’s nearest airport? London Heathrow is the nearest international airport to Oxford, just an hour and a half away by train or one hour by car. The second nearest international airport is London Gatwick or London Luton, both around two hours fifteen minutes away. The best things to do in Oxford 1. Visit the University Oxford University is made up of 38 independent colleges, including the beautiful Christ Church and the buildings can be found all over the city. 2. Visit Blenheim Palace A UNESCO World Heritage Site that possesses stunning Baroque architecture and over 2,000 acres of landscaped parkland. 3. Take a River Cruise A boat tour or punt down the River Cherwell or River Thames is a fantastic opportunity to see the city from a different perspective. Relocating to Oxford If you are an IMG who needs support in relocating to Oxford or another area of the UK and securing your first NHS post, send your CV to [email protected] and we look forward to helping you. Are you a member of IMG Advisor? By joining, you will gain access to frequent relocation blog posts, the opportunity to ask questions and receive professional support and the chance to meet some other IMGs! References Internations.org. (2019). Moving to Oxford. [online] Available at: https://www.internations.org/oxford-expats/guide/moving-to-oxford-17534 [Accessed 14 Mar. 2019]. Summer Boarding Courses. (2019). 25 Fascinating Facts About Oxford You Need To Know. [online] Available at: https://www.summerboardingcourses.co.uk/blog/fascinating-facts-about-oxford/ [Accessed 14 Mar. 2019]. Expatistan, cost of living comparisons. (2019). Cost of Living in Oxford, United Kingdom. Mar 2019 prices in Oxford.. [online] Available at: https://www.expatistan.com/cost-of-living/oxford [Accessed 14 Mar. 2019]. MoverDB.com. (2019). Moving to Oxford? 2018 Living Costs & Relocation Tips. [online] Available at: https://moverdb.com/moving-to-oxford/ [Accessed 14 Mar. 2019].  

The NHS: We need more IMGs

By Gabrielle Richardson
March 08, 2019

Recent NHS reports have recently revealed that the NHS’ staffing crisis is so severe that it could be short of 350,000 key personnel by 2030. The current analysis of the NHS’ system reveals that the visible lack of doctors and nurses is increasing daily – calling for IMGs and international nurses now more than ever. “Unless new NHS staff can quickly be recruited and trained, the NHS simply will not have the workers available to meet the demand for healthcare expected over the next decade”. Currently, the NHS needs 10,000 doctors and 40,000 nurses. However, research reveals that the gap between staff needed and the number available could reach almost 250,000 by 2020. A lack of 250,000 staff would mean that about one in six of all NHS posts were unfilled.   NHS Jobs So, if you are an international doctor looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS – we can help you. Email your CV to [email protected] and one of our Specialist Advisors will be more than happy to support you through the process. From securing a job to finding the best schools for your children!   Are you a member of IMG Advisor? By joining, you will have access to frequent relocation blog posts, the opportunity to ask questions and receive professional support and the chance to meet other IMGs. References Campbell, D. (2019). NHS ‘could be short of 350,000 staff by 2030’. ] the Guardian. Available at: https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/nov/15/nhs-could-be-short-of-350000-staff-by-2030 [Accessed 8 Mar. 2019].    

Overview of FRCR, Clinical Oncology

By Gabrielle Richardson
March 06, 2019

If you are an international Clinical Oncologist and you are planning to work at Registrar level within the UK – you will need to obtain FRCR Clinical Oncology and a pass in IELTS or OET. To obtain FRCR Clinical Oncology, you will need to pass FRCR First, Final FRCR (Part A) and Final FRCR (Part B) If you are an international Medical Oncologist and planning to work at Registrar level within the UK – you will need to obtain MRCP and a pass in IELTS or OET. Did you know that an estimate of 1 in 2 people in the UK are likely to be diagnosed with a malignancy in their lifetime? For this reason, the NHS needs both Medical and Clinical Oncologists now more than ever. Cost of FRCR Clinical Oncology 1. FRCR First - £145 for each module, a total of £580 (non-members) 2. Final FRCR (Part A) - £404 (non-members) 3. Final FRCR (Part B) - £577 (non-members) FRCR First Examination Format The exam comprises of four different papers in the form of single-best-answer (SBA) questions. Modules 1. Cancer Biology and Radiobiology 2. Clinical Pharmacology 3. Medical Statistics 4. Physics You will sit the four papers over a course of two days. You can sit the exam in Dublin, Edinburgh, Hong Kong, India, London and Manchester. FRCR First Examination Resources Single-Best Answer Questions Examiners’ Report   Final FRCR (Part A) This exam expects doctors to possess a wide knowledge of malignant disease and the management of patients with cancer. The main emphasis within this exam is on radiotherapy and drug therapy, but a good knowledge of general medicine, surgery and gynaecology is expected. This exam consists of two separate papers each consisting of 120 single-best-answers, each lasting for two hours. Modules During this exam, you will be tested on breast, lung, CNS, lymphoma, ENT, Urology, Upper Gastrointestinal, Lower Gastrointestinal, Gynaecology, Skin, Miscellaneous. You will be examined against the training curriculum for clinical oncology and the clinical oncology syllabus. You can sit the exam in Edinburgh, Hong Kong, India, London, Manchester and Singapore. Resources Single-Best Answer Questions Examiners’ Report Final FRCR (Part B) The Final FRCR (Part B) comprises of five clinical stations and eight structured oral assessments. Each station will be independently marked by two examiners. The thirteen stations are considered as a whole to generate you a pass or a fail. This means you cannot pass one part of the exam, for example, clinical only. Clinical Exam The purpose of this exam is to test your ability to examine patients appropriately and detect the presence or absence of physical signs. You will be required to interpret physical signs and to develop an appropriate differential diagnosis and management plan. You can sit the exam in Edinburgh, Hong Kong, India, London, Manchester and Singapore. Oral Exam The purpose of the oral exam is to test your ability to discuss complex issues and observe your performance of complex procedures such as the interpretation of radiological images, pathology reports, other clinical material and modify radiotherapy treatment plans. Sample Oral Questions Revision Resources Books Molecular Biology of Cancer: Mechanisms, Targets and Therapeutics Radiobiology for the Radiologist Walter & Miller’s Textbook of Radiotherapy: Radiation Physics, Therapy and Oncology Principles and Practice of Oncology (Cancer: Principles & Practice (DeVita) Khan’s Lectures: Handbook of the Physics of Radiation Therapy Online Resources FRCR Oncology Revision Notes FRCR Clinical Oncology Question Banks Cambridge Cancer Medicine Online   Do you need support securing an NHS post? If you are an international medical or clinical oncologist and you need support in relocating to the UK and joining the NHS – we can help you! Email your CV to [email protected] today. Are you a member of our Facebook Group? Are you a member of our Facebook Group IMG Advisor? Join today to gain access to frequent relocation blog posts, the opportunity to ask questions and receive professional support and the chance to meet other IMGs.   References Rcr.ac.uk. (2019). First FRCR Examination | The Royal College of Radiologists. Online] Available at: https://www.rcr.ac.uk/clinical-oncology/examinations/first-frcr-examination [Accessed 5 Mar. 2019]. Rcr.ac.uk. (2019). Final FRCR Part A Examination | The Royal College of Radiologists. ] Available at: https://www.rcr.ac.uk/clinical-oncology/examinations/final-frcr-part-a-examination [Accessed 5 Mar. 2019]. Rcr.ac.uk. (2019). Final FRCR Part B Examination | The Royal College of Radiologists. ] Available at: https://www.rcr.ac.uk/clinical-oncology/examinations/final-frcr-part-b-examination [Accessed 5 Mar. 2019].    

Overview of MRCP, Medical Oncology

By Gabrielle Richardson
February 27, 2019

If you are an international Medical Oncologist and planning to work at Registrar level within the UK – you will need to obtain MRCP and a pass in IELTS or OET. To obtain MRCP, you will need to pass MRCP Part 1, MRCP Part 2 and PACES. In this post, we provide you with an overview of each exam, fees, the format, modules, exam tips and some useful revision resources. If you are a Clinical Oncologist and planning to work at Registrar level within the UK – you will need to obtain FRCR (blog post to come) and a pass in IELTS or OET. Did you know that an estimate of 1 in 2 people in the UK are likely to be diagnosed with a malignancy in their lifetime? For this reason, the NHS needs both and Clinical Oncologists now more than ever. MRCP Fees 1. MRCPUK) Part 1 - £594: Please note that the application process/fee for the Hong Kong and Singapore centres are different. 2. MRCPUK) Part 2 Written - £594: Please note that /fee for the Hong Kong and Singapore centres are different. 3. MRCP (UK) Part 2 Clinical (PACES) - £1202 Please click here for a list of international test centres. MRCPUK) Part 1 At a glance: One-day examination Two three-hour papers 200 multiple-choice (best of five) questions No images Sat in an examination hall You will be tested on a wide range of common and important disorders in General Medicine, which are set out in the Specialty Training Curriculum for Core Medical Training. Please note that the above table is merely an indication, the questions may alter slightly in each examination sitting. What does the clinical module comprise of? 1. , molecular and membrane biology 2. Clinical anatomy 3. Clinical biochemistry and metabolism 4. Clinical physiology 5. Genetics 6. Immunology 7. Statistics, epidemiology and evidence-based medicine Please visit the Royal College’s site to note the available test centres and dates and to access sample questions please click here. MRCPUK) Part 2 At a glance: Two papers to be taken in one day Each paper is three hours long 200 multiple-choice questions (best of five) Questions include images Sat in an examination hall Part 2 of the MRCPUK) diploma can only be taken once you have passed the MRCP Part 1 examination. Part 2 builds on your knowledge that was assessed in Part 1 and will test your acquisition of medical knowledge, skills and behaviour specific in the Specialty Training Curriculum for Core Medical Training. From the beginning of 2018, the Part 2 exam moved to a single day format. The exam now consists of two, three-hour papers each with 100 questions each. Part 2 will test the ability to apply clinical understanding, make clinical judgements and will test your ability to: Prioritise diagnostic or problem lists Plan investigations Select a plan for immediate management Select a plan for long-term management Assess prognosis Exam Format The questions in this exam will typically have a clinical scenario, it may include the results of investigations and may be illustrated with images such as clinical photographs, pathology slides, inheritance trees, ECGs, X-rays, CT and MR scans and The questions will ask you about the diagnosis, investigation, management and prognosis of patients using multiple-choice questions in ‘best of five’ format. This format, in addition to testing core knowledge and comprehension, will also assess your ability to interpret information and to solve clinical problems. You must choose the best answer from the five possible answers. Each correct answer is awarded one mark and there is no negative marking. Please note that the above table is merely an indication, the questions may alter slightly in each examination sitting. To access sample here. MRCPUK) (PACES) At a glance: Half-day examination Takes place in a clinical setting (hospital or clinical skills centre) Assesses seven core skills Five stations Eight patient encounters Two independent examiners at each station The MRCPUK) Part 2 Clinical Examination (Practical Assessment of Clinical Examination Skills – PACES) sets rigorous standards to ensure that candidates are competent across a range of skills and ready to provide a high standard of care to patients. To take PACES you must have passed MRCP Part 1 within the last 7 years. What are the seven core skills? 1. Physical Examination – Demonstrate correct, thorough, systematic, appropriate and professional technique of physical examination 2. Identifying Physical Signs – Identify physical signs correctly and not find signs that are not present 3. Clinical Communication – Elicit a clinical history relevant to the patient’s complaints, in a systematic, thorough and professional manner. 4. Differential Diagnosis – Create a sensible differential diagnosis for a patient that the candidate has personal clinically assessed. 5. Clinical Judgement – Select an appropriate management plan for a patient or clinical situation. Select appropriate investigations or treatments for a patient that the candidate has personally clinically assessed. 6. Managing Patients’ Concerns – Seek, detect and acknowledge and address patients’ or relatives’ concerns, confirm their understanding and demonstrate empathy. 7. Maintaining Patient Welfare – Treat a patient or relative respectfully and sensitively and in a manner that ensures their comfort, safety and dignity. Stations At each station, you will encounter a patient or surrogate patient. Stations 1, 3 and 5 will have two encounters and stations 2 and 4 involve one. There is a total of eight encounters throughout the exam. 10 minutes are spent with each patient. PACES Exam Structure: For each case, a maximum of 6 minutes is allowed for the physical examination, followed by a minimum of 4 minutes for questioning from the examiners There are written instructions for each case Each examiner has a structured mark sheet for the case Every candidate on the carousel will be examined by the same two examiners at each station Please visit The Royal College website to gain access to sample clinical scenarios. When should I take each MRCPUK) exam components? The Royal College of Physicians has analysed previous candidate result statistics to reveal the points in time when pass rates tend to be the highest. MRCPUK) Part 1 First attempt with 12-24 months after graduation – 70% pass rate 36 months after graduation – 50% pass rate 36-48 months after graduation – 40% The guidance states “you should not apply before you feel you know enough to pass, the data that trainees who are well prepared can expect to pass at the first attempt and should not delay this beyond 24-months without good reason.” MRCPUK) Part 2 The data that your best chance of passing Part 2 is to attempt it within 36 after graduating. Candidates who take the exam at an earlier stage are slightly less likely to be successful, although the pass rate is still above 85% MRCPUK) Part 2 Clinical (PACES) The data reveals that you should delay attempting PACES at least 36 months after you have graduated Those who take the exam between 12-24 months after graduation are “very unlikely to pass” as they have had no time to develop the necessary knowledge and skills in a clinical setting. 24-36 months after graduation – 50% pass rate 36-48 months after graduation – 77% pass rate The data that candidates have the best chance of passing PACES if they have already successfully completed the part two written Tips for helping you pass MRCPUK) 1. Register early – There is a high demand for sitting the MRCPUK) exams, especially PACES as spaces are limited. If you register early you can plan your revision to fit the exam schedule and reduce the risk of missing out on your perfect time slot. 2. Start revising early – We advise you to start revising at least six months in advance of each exam to prepare adequately. Although some doctors pass with less preparation time, do not risk it. If you start your exam revision as early as possible you will increase your chance of passing. 3. Use a varied range of revision resources – do not just stick to one big textbook for your revision. The additional use of online courses, discussion forums and online tests will increase your knowledge and confidence when it comes to the exam itself. 4. Try to cover all topics evenly – Excellent knowledge of smaller topics such as statistics, ophthalmology and psychiatry will allow you to collect extra marks for only a short period of study. 5. Check the Royal College’s exam regulations - https://www.mrcpuk.org/mrcpuk-examinations/regulations Useful Revision Resources Online Pass Medicine Medical Masterclass     Books Essential Revision Notes for MRCP Basic Medical Sciences for MRCP Part 1 Best of five MCQ for Part 1 Cases for PACES Question Banks Revise MRCP Royal College of Physicians Pass Medicine Certificate Examination - Medical Oncology The Specialty Certificate Examination is the assessment method selected to determine whether a doctor has achieved competence in Oncology knowledge aspects of the curriculum. Please note, that when it comes to applying to be on the Specialist Register via CESR or CCT, you will be expected to hold SCE Oncology. The cost of SCE Medical Oncology is £665 in the UK and £833 overseas. For access to the blueprint, please click here. If you are an international medical or clinical oncologist and need support in relocating to the UK and joining the NHS – we can help you! Email your CV to [email protected] today. Are you a member of our Facebook Group IMG Advisor? Join today to gain access to frequent relocation blog posts, the opportunity to ask questions and receive professional support and the chance to meet other IMGs. References Medacs.com. (2018). Tips for choosing when to take MRCPUK) exams | Medacs Healthcare. ] Available at: https://www.medacs.com/healthcare-news/tips-for-choosing-when-to-take-mrcp-uk-exams#.WxaUb0gvyUk [Accessed 5 Jun. 2018]. Mrcouk.org. 2018) Part 1 | MRCPUK. ] Available at: https://www.mrcpuk.org/mrcpuk-examinations/part-1 Mrcouk.org. 2018) Part 1 | MRCPUK. ] Available at: https://www.mrcpuk.org/mrcpuk-examinations/part-2 Mrcouk.org. 2018) PACES | MRCPUK. ] Available at: https://www.mrcpuk.org/mrcpuk-examinations/paces Cancer Research UK. (2019). Lifetime risk of cancer. ] Available at: https://www.cancerresearchuk.org/health-professional/cancer-statistics/risk/lifetime-risk [Accessed 27 Feb. 2019].    

Q&A with Dr Seshni Moodliar, UK Consultant Psychiatrist

By Gabrielle Richardson
February 25, 2019

Introduction 1. What is your name, speciality, grade and what hospital do you work at? I’m Dr Seshni Moodliar, and I’m a Consultant Psychiatrist. I specialise with Adults with learning disabilities. I’m currently fortunate enough to work in both the private sector and the NHS in private practice. I also do on calls at Milton Keynes General Hospital and Chadwick lodge. I also do some Medico legal work. 2. What country did you relocate from? I’m privileged to have relocated from South Africa in 2003 when Nelson Mandela was still our President and who played a role in me being able to study at of . I graduated in 2000 and I was the first Indian/Asian to graduate from that university. 3. Would you share with us your personal mission as a doctor? I’ve always wanted to be a doctor the age of six. I’ve wanted to help and heal people that were ill and sick and would read about all the different illnesses and their treatments. This was further supported by my paternal grandfather Appodorai, who had Parkinson’s and I used to care for him. He used to say I had healing hands. I therefore decided to pursue my passion of becoming a doctor which was also a dream of my father, Deena Thirupathi Moodliar, who was a spice businessman. He wanted to become a his parents couldn’t afford it, so I decided I would do it for him too. I’m grateful to all my family, friends and colleagues who helped me to become a doctor.  4. At what point in your career did you decide you wanted to relocate to the UK? What were your motivations for wanting to do so? When I completed my medical training in South Africa, my husband Ferdinand Rensburg and I wanted to take a year out to travel with three other South African doctors and friends. Named Dr Jessica Maistry, Dr Debbie Jafta and Dr Loshni. My motivation for moving to the UK was to travel and experience a new place. 5. Why did you choose to specialise in Psychiatry? I have always been intrigued by the mind and body link. I worked within the Mental Health Services in South Africa, during my internship in Durban at King Edward Hospital and there I was exposed to a range of mental health problems and genetic disorders. I then discovered that Psychiatry was one of the those rich specialties where we actually see the holistic approach of treatment in its purest forms. It then became my desire to pursue a career in Psychiatry as I wanted to treat people holistically to get better. By holistically I mean an approach which uses biological interventions like medication, psychological like talking therapies and social like social support.  The Relocation Process 6. How long did it take you to relocate, how difficult did you find the process? Do you recommend the same process to other IMGs? I have been fortunate as the relocation process was handled brilliantly by the agency I was working with at the time. I had saved some money from working as a doctor for two years, I then made my application and organised my passport. I sat IELTS, but I was lucky and did not have to do the conversion exam. This meant that I got a full GMC Registration. I had my husband, family in the UK and another three doctors who were going through the process at the same time. When I arrived in the UK, I had to organise my National Insurance number and open a bank account, but again we were lucky enough to be guided through this. At first, I opted to work as a Resident Medical Officer as my friends and husband were going to travel on our weeks off. This was the best choice for us and I thoroughly enjoyed working for a week. The work was easy, the hospital offered me accommodation, meals and other facilities. The staff were friendly and the pay was good. I managed to use some money I was also able to send money home to my parents as my dad was looking at buying a spice shop. After I completed 6 months as an RMO, I then started to do Psychiatry locums to first get experience in how Psychiatry training and the Mental Health Services in the UK worked. I definitely recommend this to other doctors to consider travelling abroad to practice and study. I’m aware that BDI Resourcing does relocate doctors in the same way I was assisted and would definitely recommend their agency too. 7. Is there anything you would have liked to have known before deciding to relocate? And now once you live in the UK? I guess there will always be things we would have liked to have known, but as we had a good agency, family and friends the process was easy and everyone was extremely helpful.  Colleagues around were also very friendly and helpful. Thoughts on the UK 8. For you, what are the key benefits of living in the UK? The plan for me and my husband was to come to the UK, travel with our friends and then return to our families in the South Africa. However, as I wanted to then pursue a training in Psychiatry and he wanted to complete his law training we decided to stay.  Psychiatry training in the UK, in my view from doing locums, is much more developed in terms of holistic treatment and access to resources. This is something I felt and therefore, I decided to pursue Psychiatry in the UK.  9. How do you feel you in your chosen location within the UK?  We were always in limbo about going back to South Africa, especially as we do miss our family and friends a lot. However, as we started to have a family, we decided to stay for our three kids in order for them to have an opportunity in the country of their birth.  With the amazing advancement in technology, we are fortunate to continue to communicate with family on a daily basis with Skype, WhatsApp video calls and the telephone, so we are able to be in touch regularly. We are still passionate about helping people in South Africa and continue to remain involved in charity for children and adults in South Africa.  The NHS 11. How did you feel on your first day of working within the NHS, your first week, month and then how do you feel now compared to when you first started? I was excited about working for the NHS and I initially started with locum work. Again, the agencies were good and helpful. Locum work allowed me to learn a lot about the hospital, the systems, the people and the teams. Definitely I would say initially not knowing much can be overwhelming, however, within a few days and with the help and support, I adjusted quickly into the NHS.  12.  How would you describe the support you received from your hospital after starting your new position?  Hospitals initially did an induction and training in various aspects like fire training, first aid training, manual handling, infection control, IT system and care notes training to note a few. The hospital manager ensured that each new member of staff had a tour of the hospital, wards and induction of keys.  I was also given a badge and introduced to all the staff on the ward.  13. What year did you relocate to the UK? Do you think the UK/NHS system has changed much since then? I relocated in 2003 and yes, there has been many changes for the better the NHS in terms of working and providing effective, safe care and keeping our patients at the heart of everything we do. The NHS continues to go through various changes overall, it’s been good to see how it's transformed and continues to provide care for millions of people in the UK.  14. What is your opinion on the NHS? Working within it and as a patient receiving care? I have worked well in the NHS and despite the challenges faced, the NHS continues to provide effective and safe care. I’m a firm believer in the ethos of the NHS and upholding that we keep our patients at the heart of everything we do. I’ve been on the receiving end of NHS care too for the delivery of my 3 children at Milton Keynes General Hospital and I highly commend the NHS and GP services for the brilliant care I received.  15. Did you use the CESR pathway to become a Consultant? How did you find it and any advice to other IMGs who want to take the same pathway? I did my postgraduate training rotating in Psychiatry within the Hertfordshire, West Midlands and the Eastern Deanery. I completed my SHO training at Milton Keynes General Hospital and Oxford. I then started CT training in West Midlands and continued this in Hertfordshire. After I successfully completed my exams in Psychiatry of written papers and the CASC exam in 2010, I then started my ST training and my higher training in adults with learning disabilities in Cambridge and the Eastern Deanery.  I then became a Consultant with Adults learning disabilities in 2012.  16. How do you find working in the UK compared to your home country? I enjoy working in both South Africa and UK, however, the Psychiatry services in the UK are more developed. Podcast and YouTube 17. Can you explain your brand Happiness doctor’s kitchen? As a Psychiatrist, I can safely say with years of training and studying the mind and body I’m possibly one of the happiest people on this planet and I’m always complemented on this. I’m a firm believer in healthy body means a healthy mind. My aim is to share my secrets to happiness with others so that people who are suffering with mental health problems which are real, and a serious problem worldwide can recover and to educate them about the importance of health and well-being. I am also a firm believer in you are what you eat. I therefore have completed a book named Happy doctor’s kitchen which are researched and evidence-based ways of incorporating foods rich with serotonin, such as eggs, cheese, turkey and salmon - in order to keep you happy and healthy! My passion for food and people started in my childhood when I worked alongside my late dad Deena Moodliar, my sisters Tamara Valashni Govender, Sanusha Ponen and my mother in our family spice business RA Moodley in Victoria street market in Durban South Africa which was originally my grandfather’s Appodorai.  18. Can you explain what led you to create a YouTube channel and your podcast? As a Psychiatrist I’m passionate about sharing mine and other's pearls of wisdom of happiness which led to my YouTube channel and podcast which I collaborate with different people who are also experts in their field. I’ve just completed a podcast with Dr Sanjiv the Dean in Harvard Medical School, Hepatology Consultant and Professor Medicine. In the podcast he shares his wisdom on Dharma, Happiness and living your purpose. He is also the brother of Dr Deepak Chopra. I’m so grateful for that podcast and the wisdom he shares too.  19. Can you tell us about your recent publication? Following the brilliant support from my husband and friends and family, I wrote a book Pass the CASC in 2012 which is currently in its 7th edition. It was my husband’s idea would you believe, and he believed in me when I didn’t even realise the merit of my book. It was peer reviewed by 50 other Psychiatrists, many of I’m grateful to as they helped me in my exam. I completed it before I became a Consultant and was still a Registrar. It’s currently being used worldwide by doctors for the final MRCPsych exam CASC/OSCE, which usually takes place in Sheffield, Singapore and Hong Kong.  It’s also being used in Australia and New Zealand for the RANZP exam. 20. What is your final advice for junior doctors who are looking to pursue Psychiatry? Or senior doctors starting their first NHS Psychiatry post? I’m biased as Psychiatry is my passion and I love being a psychiatrist. My advice to junior doctors and any person really is that whatever career you choose to pursue you need to be passionate about it and you need to therefore be able to do this for the rest of your life. You don’t want to do something that’s not going to make you happy.  When choosing a speciality choose something that’s going to make you happy, something you are passionate about, something which will be in line with your purpose in life and something you can see yourself doing for the rest of your life. My choice was also guided with choosing something which was going to give me a good work life balance.  I would urge junior doctors to pursue a career in Psychiatry as it’s definitely rewarding, especially when we can make a difference in a person’s life using a holistic approach and being supported by the multidisciplinary team. There are also opportunities to do research, teaching and to practice clinical governance which are all important in CPD activities.  The Future 21. What are your hopes and plans for the future? I’m so grateful to be in a happy place right now following my passion of being a Psychiatrist, teaching Psychiatrists worldwide to communicate effectively with their patients, carers and other professionals in order for them to be the best Psychiatrists. I’m excited about being the author of the Happy Doctors Kitchen and Happiness Psychiatrists - sharing mine and other's pearls of wisdom on happiness to others worldwide. I’m so grateful Asma Said Khan is providing the foreword for my Happy doctors kitchen. She’s the first British female chef to be on on was released on 22 February. She owns Darjeeling Express in and Calcutta canteen which both are my favourite places to eat! My focus is and continues to be in line with the Hippocratic oath I’ve taken which is to be of service to others, helping, healing and ensuring my patients' recovery, hope for their future and emotional well-being which is at the heart of what I do  I’m a happy mum and I remain a dedicated mother and wife to my husband and my three children who are all golfers. I truly have been blessed with family and friends not only in in the UK too who make it all the more worthwhile being able to do what I do and to help others as I’ve been helped which is my main aim.  I love writing and definitely love reading books. I have spent a lot of my time in libraries since a young age, so I’m definitely going to continue to write many books-sharing my pearls of wisdom. The recent books I’ve read is Turban and Tales by Amit and Naroop and SPIKE by Rene Carayol (MBE)  who are friends of mine. I’m reading The Art of Happiness by his holiness the  Dali Lama and Dr Howard Cutler (a psychiatrist) whom I would love someday to meet and interview. I also just met Author of Darjeeling Express who is supporting female chefs and has been featured Chefs table on Netflix. Thank you. Link to Dr Moodliar's YouTube - https://youtu.be/cMSmliCxDPQ  Link to Dr Moodliar's Podcast - https://bit.ly/2NtfQBv  Link to Dr Moodliar's CASC Book - www.passthecasccourse.co.uk Are you a member of our Facebook Group? By joining IMG Advisor, you will have access to frequent relocation blog posts, the opportunity to ask questions and receive professional support and the chance to meet other IMGs.  

Q&A with Jil Shah, A&E CT1 Doctor

By Gabrielle Richardson
February 21, 2019

Introduction 1. What speciality, grade and what hospital do you work at? I work at the Mid Yorkshire NHS Trust Hospital in the Emergency Department and I work at CT1 level. 2. What country did you relocate from? India (Mumbai) 3. Would you share with us your personal mission as a doctor? Going to medical school was always my childhood dream, but I did face a few difficulties whilst I was studying and training to be a doctor. One reason was because I was the first doctor in my family and so I felt there was nobody there to guide me. However, I must say it is worth all of the effort. 4. At what point in your career did you decide you wanted to relocate to the UK? What were your motivations for wanting to do so? I was working in one of the renowned corporate hospitals in Mumbai, when I decided that I needed to get trained in a better way and so I started to look for other options. I read many articles about practising Emergency Medicine in the UK and that the UK's training programmes are of higher standards. And so, I started to do my own research to look for ways to obtain GMC Registration.  The Relocation Process 5. How long did it take you to relocate, how difficult did you find the process and do you recommend it to other IMGs? It took me about 9 months to relocate to the UK.  I sat my IELTS exam in January 2018 and then I sat my PLAB 1 exam in March 2018. I studied on my own for these two exams. For PLAB 2, I decided to join Swamy's Academy and I came to Manchester to attend the course two months prior to sitting my exam. I also decided to study with my friends (you definitely need a study partner for PLAB 2). Whilst I was waiting for my PLAB 2 results, I came across a job advertisement by Elliott Burrows from BDI Resourcing. I contacted Elliott and told him the entire situation and I also requested for him to secure me a job in Leeds or around Leeds. Elliott then went on to set up my interview. I had two rounds of interviews and I was offered a job.  From the point of contacting Elliott to receiving my offer letter from the hospital, it took me about 3-4 weeks. As, I was in the UK on a Visit Visa, I had to go back to India to apply for my Tier 2 visa. I applied for UKNARIC since my IELTS certificate was not UKVI. By the end of September, I applied for the visa and I got my visa approved within 10 days.  I returned to the UK with the hope to start my new job as soon as possible, but BRP was delayed because the Home Office was having a backlog due to the students entering the country around the same time. The process I went through was not as difficult as I thought it would be. Elliott helped me throughout the entire process of relocating. 6. Would you have liked to have known before deciding to relocate? And now once you live in the UK? Elliott had told me about almost everything, how to travel to my work place, how to open a bank account and how to rent accommodation. So, I don't think there was anything that I did not know before coming to the UK. Thoughts on the UK 7. For you, what are the key benefits of living in the UK? The UK has a better lifestyle, better clinical practice and scope to flourish in a desired . 8. How do you feel you in your chosen location within the UK? I have never lived alone in my entire life and so I am definitely home sick. Initially, I felt lonely but over a period of time you get used to a new place. I found it difficult to settle into Leeds as I came from a Metropolitan city, Mumbai - which is very lively at any single time of day.  The shops in Leeds are easily accessible and settling into the culture was not difficult.  The NHS 9. How did you feel on your first day of working within the NHS, your first week, month and then how do you feel now compared to when you first started? The first day was difficult because the UK healthcare system works in unique way compared to India. I took time to understand the system, but when your clinical knowledge and skills are strong, it is not difficult at all. After 3 months of working in the NHS, I began to feel confident when working with my patients. 10. How would you describe the support you received from your hospital after starting your new position? The hospital is very supportive, everyone is very helpful and kind enough to teach you and guide you. They do not differentiate you from others and give equal opportunities as a trainee, in spite of being in a non-trainee post. 11. What is your opinion on the NHS? Working within it and as a patient receiving care? Like every health care system, the NHS also has few drawbacks. The first is the insufficient number of doctors, which burdens the present doctors working within the system. This also increases the waiting time for the patients to be seen by a doctor. But everyone working in the NHS does try to provide the best care possible. 12. How do you find working in the UK compared to your home country? It is difficult to compare the health care system in the UK to India. The Indian health care system is based more on the Private health care system. But working in the NHS is very different from working in India. You take decisions more rationally while working in the NHS and it helps to develop your clinical skills. The Future 13. What are your hopes and goals for the future? I hope to enter the training program in Emergency Medicine and become a Consultant in the UK.  

Brexit: What does it mean for IMGs?

By Gabrielle Richardson
February 15, 2019

What is Brexit? Brexit is an abbreviation of ‘British exit’ – and it is the word used to talk about the United Kingdom’s decision to leave the European Union (EU). What is the EU? The EU is a political and economic union of 28 countries which trade with each other and allow citizens to move easily between the countries to live and work. The UK joined the EU, then known as the EEC (European Economic Community) in1973. Why is the UK leaving the EU? On Thursday 23rd June 2016, a referendum was held when voters were asked one question: Should the UK leave or remain in the EU? The leave vote won by nearly 52% to 48%, which was equivalent to 17.4m votes to 16.1m – but the exit is yet to happen. IMGs in the NHS stats: Did you know that 37% of registered doctors gained their primary medical qualification outside of the UK and this rises to 42% for Consultants. Of every 1,000 NHS staff in England... 873 are British 56 are from other EU countries 43 are Asian 19 are African 9 are from somewhere else… The most common nationalities of NHS staff: British – 988, 363 Indian – 19, 142 Filipino – 16, 807 Irish – 13, 132 Polish – 8, 896 Portuguese - 6,899 Nigerian – 5,960 Zimbabwean – 3, 995 What does Brexit mean for international doctors? Reports reveal that since the UK voted for Brexit, the number of European doctors and nurses relocating to the UK and joining the NHS has declined. So, although we cannot say what the outcome will be post-Brexit, with the current trend of less European doctors joining the NHS – it has led and will continue to lead to a greater demand of non-EU doctors to come and join the NHS. Join our Facebook Group IMG Advisor - here, you will receive regular updates in the form of blogs and vlogs, have the opportunity to ask questions and receive professional guidance and the chance to meet other IMGs! References BBC News. (2019). Brexit: A really simple guide. [online] Available at: https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-46318565 [Accessed 14 Feb. 2019]. Baker, C. (2019). NHS staff from overseas: statistics. [online] Researchbriefings.parliament.uk. Available at: https://researchbriefings.parliament.uk/ResearchBriefing/Summary/CBP-7783#fullreport [Accessed 14 Feb. 2019]. RCP London. (2019). Brexit: What does it mean for doctors?. [online] Available at: https://www.rcplondon.ac.uk/projects/outputs/brexit-what-does-it-mean-doctors [Accessed 15 Feb. 2019].  

Overview of FRCEM Primary

By Gabrielle Richardson
February 13, 2019

The Royal College of Emergency Medicine offers a series of examinations which can lead to either a Membership or Fellowship of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (FRCEM). How to achieve MRCEM: FRCEM Primary FRCEM Intermediate: SAQ MRCEM Final: OSCE How to achieve FRCEM: FRCEM Primary FRCEM Intermediate: SAQ and Situational Judgement FRCEM Final: Critical Appraisal, Quality Improvement Project, Clinical Short Answer Question Paper, OSCE Cost of the FRCEM Primary Exam: £310 Format of the FRCEM Primary Exam: A 3-hour, multiple-choice question paper of 180 single-best-answer questions. Am I eligible to sit FRCEM Primary? The FRCEM Primary exam will test your knowledge against the Emergency Medicine 2015 Curriculum with more details information provided in the RCEM Basic Sciences Curriculum (June 2010). To apply for the exam, you will need to hold a GMC approved primary medical qualification for the purposes of registration. Please note, typically, there is not a restriction on the number of places available for the FRCEM Primary examination, but candidates may not always be allocated their first-choice venue. 2019 FRCEM Primary Examination Dates Date Centre Application Open Date Application Closing Date 13th June 2019 London, Dublin, Edinburgh, Leeds, Cardiff, Chennai, Hyderabad, New Delhi, Reykjavik, Kuala Lumpur, Muscat 2nd January 2019 4TH March 2019 5th December 2019 London, Dublin, Edinburgh, Leeds, Cardiff, Chennai, Hyderabad, New Delhi, Reykjavik, Kuala Lumpur, Muscat 1st July 2019 3rd September 20119 Structure and Content of the FRCEM Primary Anatomy – 60 questions Lower limb, thorax, abdomen, head and neck, central nervous system and cranial nerve lesions. Physiology – 60 questions Respiratory physiology, cardiovascular physiology, gastrointestinal physiology, renal physiology, and endocrine physiology. Pharmacology -27 questions Gastrointestinal pharmacology, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, central nervous system, infections, endocrine system, fluids and electrolytes, musculoskeletal system, immunological products and vaccines, anaesthesia. Microbiology – 18 questions Pathogen and principles of microbiology. Pathology – 9 questions Inflammatory responses, infection, wound healing and haematology. Evidence-based medicine – 6 questions Statistics, study methodology and principles of critical appraisal. How to successfully prepare for FRCEM Primary? Give yourself enough time to prepare confidently and successfully Utilise the curriculum - according to doctors who have sat the FRCEM Primary exam, it is very representative of the exam content – making it a fantastic revision guide Practice mock exams – this will provide you with a good picture of your strength and weaknesses, allowing you to narrow down your revision Useful Revision Resources Books FRCEM Primary – All in One Revision Notes for FRCEM Primary Question Banks FRCEM Exam Bookstore Question Bank FRCEM Success YouTube Videos Bromley Emergency Courses James Rowley References Rcem.ac.uk. (2019). Dates and Fees. [online] Available at: https://www.rcem.ac.uk/RCEM/Exams_Training/Exams/Dates_Fees/RCEM/Exams_Training/Exams/Dates_and_Fees.aspx [Accessed 13 Feb. 2019]. Ponder Med. (2019). Revision Tips for the MRCEM A/FRCEM Primary - Ponder Med. [online] Available at: https://www.pondermed.com/mrcem-exams/revision-tips-for-the-mrcem-afrcem-primary/ [Accessed 13 Feb. 2019].  

WAST: Widening Access to Specialty Training for IMGs

By Gabrielle Richardson
February 06, 2019

The NHS has launched a new initiative to allow international doctors to work and train in England, prior to obtaining NHS experience (as is required to apply for a training post). The new initiative will allow you to experience a programme which will ensure you develop the skills and competencies needed to apply a training programme after you have completed it. During the initiative, you will work six months in a Psychiatry post, six months in an Acute hospital setting and a two-week taster session within a General Practice Surgery. The NHS states that this post is perfect for doctors who want to pursue a career in General Practice (internationally known as family medicine) or Psychiatry. Bonus! A financial relocation package will be provided. How do I apply for WAST? First, you will need to update your CV and then make an online application here. If you are successful, you will then be invited to attend an interview and assessment centre located in the UK. It is likely that your interview will be held in Manchester.   Interviews are expected to be held in March 2019, August 2019 and March 2020 and then posts likely to start in February or August the next year. Please note, you will still need via the PLAB route to start a WAST post. What is the advantage of WAST? This is a fantastic opportunity for international doctors looking to pursue a long-term career within the UK and receive training. By completing WAST, you will have access to: Top quality training and development Good standard of pay Work experience within one of the world’s largest healthcare systems Am I eligible to apply for WAST? To apply, you must have the following: A GMC recognised primary medical qualification Eligible for full GMC registration Eligible to legally work in the UK Have additional qualifications such as ILS, ALS, Have recently completed your internship and have six-twelve months postgraduate experience For further information on how to access UK Specialty Training within the NHS, read our blog post here. Please click here to gain access to the WAST Application Form. Please click here to gain access to the Additional Employment History Form Please click here to gain access to the Fitness to the Practise Declaration Are you a member of our Facebook Group IMG Advisor? Here, you will have access to relocation blog posts and updates, the opportunity to receive professional support and the chance to meet other IMGs.  References training. (2019).  Training > Recruitment > Widening Access to Specialty Training > About the programme. ] Available at: https://specialtytraining.hee.nhs.uk/Recruitment/Widening-Access-to-Specialty-Training/About-the-programme [Accessed 5 Feb. 2019]. . (2019). Apply. ] Available at: https://specialtytraining.hee.nhs.uk/Recruitment/Widening-Access-to-Specialty-Training/Apply [Accessed 5 Feb. 2019].    

Overview of First FRCR

By Gabrielle Richardson
February 04, 2019

To work as a Radiologist in the UK, you will need full FRCR and a pass in IELTS or OET – obtaining these qualifications will provide you with GMC Registration. Full FRCR includes passing: First FRCR, FRCR 2A, FRCR 2B. In today’s post, we focus on First FRCR. We cover the exam cost, structure, modules tested, exam test centres and useful revision resources. What is the purpose of FRCR? The First FRCR exam expects doctors to have gained an appropriate level of knowledge of the physical principles that underpin diagnostic medical imaging and of the anatomy needed to perform and interpret radiological studies. Cost Physics £253 Anatomy £253 Total £506 The Examination Structure The exam consists of two modules: Anatomy – examined by an image viewing session delivered on individual workstations Physics – is a multiple-choice question paper Both of the exams are held over a two-day period three times a year: typically, in March, June and September. The two exams will be held on different days. Click here to find out upcoming exam dates. You will be deemed to pass the First FRCR once both exam modules have been passed. Please note, you cannot attempt First FRCR more than six times. How do I know if I am eligible to apply? The Royal College of Radiologists requires applicants to hold a formal clinical radiology training post in which they are actively receiving clinical radiology training to enter the First FRCR exam. However, no minimum period is required to enter. Where can I sit the exam? UK locations: Belfast, Birmingham, Glasgow, London and Manchester. International locations: Hong Kong and Singapore. Examination Format Anatomy – Image viewing module You will be presented with 100 images with one question per image. Most of the questions will be structured as “what structure does the arrow point to?” however, you may also be asked “what anatomical variant is demonstrated?” or “at what age does the structure arrowed normally fuse during skeletal development”? The exam format will be as follows: Cross-sectional: 1/3 Plain radiographs: 1/3 Contrast studies: 1/3 You will be tested within the following modules: head, neck and spine, chest and cardiovascular, abdomen and pelvis and musculoskeletal. There will also be a few questions Paediatric images and normal variants.   You will have 90 minutes to view the images and record your answers. You will receive two marks for a correct answer and one mark for an answer which is correct but not completely accurate and zero marks for an incorrect answer. During the exam, keystrokes and screen activity are monitored and recorded centrally. What revision books should I use? Passing FRCR Part 1: Cracking Anatomy FRCR Part 1 Anatomy Mock Examinations Radiological Anatomy for FRCR Part 1 Physics – Multiple Choice Question Paper This exam consists of 200 true or false questions and you will be presented with 40 stems (question or statement) and then five statements for each stem which will need to be marked true or false. You will have two hours to answer the questions. During this exam, you will be tested in the following areas: basic science, x-ray imaging, CT imaging, ultrasound imaging, MR imaging, nuclear imaging, radiation dosimetry and protection and legislation. Please note, the exam is not negatively marked and therefore you are encouraged to answer all questions. What revision books should I use? Get Through First FRCR: Multiple-Choice-Questions for the Physics Module FRCR Physics Notes A Radiologist’s on Physics for the FRCR Exam Are there any online resources I can use? Radiology Café Revise Radiology Radiology Multiple-Choice-Questions Please click here to gain access to the Royal College’s Guidance Notes for Applicants. Are you looking for your first NHS post? Join our Facebook Group, IMG Advisor – Here, you will have access to frequent relocation blog posts, the opportunity to answer questions and receive professional support. If you have made steps towards obtaining your GMC Registration – email your CV to [email protected] and we would love to support you through the process. References Clarke, C. (2019). First FRCR exam. ] Radiology Cafe. Available at: https://www.radiologycafe.com/radiology-trainees/first-frcr-exam#physics_books [Accessed 4 Feb. 2019]. Rcr.ac.uk. (2019). First FRCR Examination | The Royal College of Radiologists. ] Available at: https://www.rcr.ac.uk/clinical-radiology/examinations/first-frcr-examination [Accessed 4 Feb. 2019].    

How much tax will I pay in the UK?

By Gabrielle Richardson
February 01, 2019

As an employee within the United Kingdom, you will need to pay both income tax and national insurance on your wages. Disclaimer: Tax figures are always open and to change and Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs (HMRC) assesses everyone’s personal circumstances within personal tax codes and so this article is purely a guideline. How do I know if I need to pay tax? Every person is entitled to a tax-free Personal Allowance of £11,850 for the year (this is set to increase to £12,500 in the tax year of 2019-20). How much tax do I have to pay if I earn over the Personal Allowance? In the UK, the tax system is based on marginal tax brackets. This means that the amount you are taxed is worked out based on the income you earn against certain thresholds. As a UK employee: You will pay 0% of tax on incomes up to £11,850 (£12,500 for 2019-20) Then you will pay 20% on anything you earn between £11,851 and £46,350 (£12,501-£50,001 for 2019-20) You will pay 40% Income Tax on anything you earn between £46,351 to £150,000) (£50,001-£150,000 for 2019-20). If you earn over £150,001 and over, you pay 45% tax Examples of take-home pay for a doctor Annual Salary (before tax) Monthly take home (after tax) £30,000 £1,982 £40,000 £2,549 £50,000 £3,085 £60,000 £3,568 £70,000 £4,052 £80,000 £4,535 Please click here to work out your exact take-home pay with a salary calculator. Paying tax on foreign income You may need to pay UK income tax on foreign income. For example: Foreign investments and savings interest Rental income on overseas property Income from pensions held overseas This income includes anything from outside of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. What is a National Insurance contribution? You will also be required to pay a national insurance contribution on your earnings to help build your entitlement to certain state benefits, such as the State Pension and Maternity Allowance. Dissimilar to income tax, national insurance is not an annual tax. You begin to pay National Insurance once you earn more than £162 a week and it applies to your pay each pay period (i.e. monthly, weekly etc). This means that if you earn extra in one month, you will pay extra national insurance. Your National Insurance contributions will be: 12% of your weekly earnings between £162 and £892 2% of your weekly earnings if you earn above £892 Please note, your National Insurance contributions will be taken off along with Income Tax before your employer pays your wages. How do I pay my tax and national insurance contribution? If your Personal Allowance is spread out evenly across your wages for the year, then your tax and national insurance contributions should be taken before you are paid. The UK Government know how much to take through a system called PAYE (pay as you earn). Where does UK taxpayer’s money go? The money is used to help provide funding for public services such as the NHS, the education and welfare system as well as investment in public projects, such as roads, rail and housing. Personal Savings Allowance When you open a UK bank account, you can also earn some income from your savings without paying tax. If you pay a basic tax rate, then you can earn up to £1,000 in tax-free savings. Higher rate taxpayers can earn up to £500. Join our Facebook Group IMG Advisor – Here, you will gain access to frequent relocation blog posts, the opportunity to ask questions and receive professional advice and the chance to meet other IMGs! References Moneyadviceservice.org.uk. (2019). How much Income Tax and National Insurance you should pay. [online] Available at: https://www.moneyadviceservice.org.uk/en/articles/tax-and-national-insurance-deductions [Accessed 1 Feb. 2019]. S, H. (2019). Tax Rates 2018/19. [online] MoneySavingExpert.com. Available at: https://www.moneysavingexpert.com/banking/tax-rates/ [Accessed 1 Feb. 2019].  

error: Content is protected !!