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Transferring money Abroad from the UK

By Alice Howe
July 29, 2020

Once you are settled in your new home and job, you may wish to send money back to your home country to help care for relatives or as a gift, but it can seem daunting trying to decide which method is best for your situation. In this article, we outline the ways in which you can transfer money overseas from the UK, what to be aware of, and which method will be most beneficial to you. It is important to note that we are not financial advisors and this article is a guide. We would always recommend that you consult a professional for further information.   Things to Consider Before you decide which method you wish to utilise to transfer money abroad, some important things to consider to help you make a decision are why you wish to send money abroad, how much you are intending to send, and how frequently you wish to do this. These are important questions to ask, as each method of transferring money will have its pros and cons, and these factors can help you narrow down which system will be best for you. We will outline which method is best for individual situations later in this article. Another thing to be aware of is exchange rates and fees. Certain methods will offer you better exchange rates and value for the money you are sending, and some methods may charge you a fee to transfer the money abroad for you. As we explain each method, we will outline the fees and exchange rates associated with each.   Methods of Transferring Money Abroad There are three main methods of transferring money from the UK to overseas accounts. These methods are: Bank Transfer Money Transferring Firms Foreign Exchange Brokers We will go into detail about the pros and cons of each of these.   Bank Transfer Bank transfers are considered to be the best option for transferring regular mid-range payments overseas, such as transferring money to parents or other family members overseas on a weekly or monthly basis. This is because bank transfer is considered to be the safest and most reliable option for safeguarding your money, and also the easiest way to set up a recurring payment. Unfortunately, whilst it is the most secure and often convenient method for long-term payments, the downsides are that the exchange rate will often not be particularly competitive, so you may not get the best value for your money. As well as that, it is likely that there will be fees involved with transferring money overseas, unless the bank you are transferring money to overseas is linked with the UK branch. Some branches have sister banks overseas, in this case, there are often no, or lower charges involved, though often for this to be approved, the bank account overseas must be in the same name as the bank account you are sending money from. The Money Saving Expert website offers some helpful advice on which bank is most beneficial for different countries, you can read more here. Pros It is the safest method of transferring money overseas It is the best method for small to mid-range regular payments Easy to set up regular transactions Most banks allow you to set up transactions online, over the phone or in your local bank, this may vary from bank to bank. You have protections of the Financial Services Compensation Scheme if you transfer money via a UK bank or building society – this will protect your money if something happens to the bank. Some banks allow free transfers between linked banks – both accounts may need to be in the same name, this will depend on the bank. Most banks have 24/7 online banking to allow you to transfer money whenever you need to. Some banks will allow you to transfer up to £50,000 in one transaction, but this will vary depending on the bank and method you are using, and some banks may have daily limits for safety reasons. Some banks do not charge fees if you are transferring money within the European Economic Area (EEA). Cons It is not the cheapest The exchange rate may not be the best, particularly large amounts over £5000 The exchange rate is often set in-house It could take 4-6 days for the bank transfer to process Rates won’t be competitive There are often fees for transferring money abroad, Barclays bank reportedly currently charges £25 for an international transfer and £40 for a fast transfer, or £15 if you set this payment up online.   How to set up a payment This will vary depending on your bank, but you will, of course, need a UK bank account to transfer money from, and your recipient will need an overseas account to receive the payment. As previously mentioned, ideally, they will have a linked account to save on fees, but as long as they have a bank account, they should be able to receive payment. Each bank’s requirements may vary slightly, but HSBC states that in order to make an overseas transfer, you will need: Your account details The name and address of your beneficiary The beneficiary’s bank code (this is also called a Business or Branch Identifier Code (BIC)) you can usually find this on bank statements. The beneficiary’s International Bank Account Number (IBAN) or account number – An IBAN is a set of alphanumeric characters, but depending on the beneficiary’s account, they may not have an IBAN, and may only hold an account number. These can usually be found on bank statements. The country of your beneficiary’s bank account The amount you wish to pay them Any reference you want included with the payment Your reason for making the payment These are HSBC’s current fees for transferring money overseas as well, please note that this will again vary from bank to bank, and this is only to give you an idea of how fees operate. Payment Type Online Branch Phone Postal HSBC to HSBC £0 £0 £0 £17 Euros outside EEA or any other currency outside of UK or any foreign currency (other than Euros) in the UK £4 £9 £9 £17 Euros within EEA £0 £0 £0 £17   Banks you Can Use Here are some banks that offer international transfers, we advise you to do your own research to decide which one will be best for your situation. HSBC Santander Royal Bank of Scotland   Money Transferring Firms Transferring firms are often considered to be the best option for fast, one-off payments, for example, if you wish to send money as a gift, and as these firms exist for the purpose of transferring money abroad, they have great systems in place for doing this quickly and efficiently. It is important to be aware that there are no compensation schemes in place to protect your money if the company went bust, so it is riskier than transferring money via your bank, but that said, some of the other benefits outweigh the negatives for many people. A final positive thing to mention about this method is that you aren’t restricted to simply transferring money to a bank account, whilst this is an option, it is also possible to send money to the recipient’s phone, or to a safe location for them to collect the money in person, depending on the country you are transferring to. Some recommended that you don’t send more than £5000 via a money transferring firm.   Pros Great option for fast transfers Exchange rates vary, but this can sometimes be beneficial. Some firms do not currently charge for transactions within the EU. Best option for small amounts of money. You can send money directly to an account, to their mobile or for cash pick-up. You can pay via your bank account, or via credit or debit cards including Visa, MasterCard, Maestro and Visa Electron. You are able to transfer money 24/7, though if you opt for pick up, the recipient may not receive it as quickly depending on the time difference. You may be able to send up to £50,000 in one transaction with some firms if you have satisfied their identity checks. Transfers can generally be made online or over the phone. Cons Fees are sometimes higher than they are with banks. There is protection with firms than you would have with a bank. It can take 2-4 days at most. It can take a few days to verify your account upon first signing up. It is recommended that you do not send more than £5000 via this method.   How to set up a Payment In order to make a payment with a firm, you will generally need to sign up with their website and create an account and also have your address verified, this can take a few days, so the initial set up can take some extra time. Once your account is verified, you can choose whether you wish to send money via your bank account or a debit or credit card, after which you may select the country you wish to transfer money to. Once you have selected a country, they will then be able to suggest different ways the beneficiary can receive the money, whether you wish to transfer it to their bank account, mobile phone or to a location for pick up. Please note that not all countries will offer all of these options. Once you have sent the money, you will be advised how long it will take for the recipient to receive the payment, though sometimes this will not include the length of the processing time. This is still a faster method than transferring money via your bank though. With the money transferring firm, Western Union, if you opt to send money for pick up, your recipient will be able to pick up the cash from a Western Union location, though when they can collect the money will depend on the location’s hours of operation, so it is important to bear this in mind if you need to send money urgently. Western Union also offers mobile transfer, again, other firms may not offer this, and it will be dependent on the country. If a country does accept this form of transfer, this can be an incredibly fast method of sending money, with Western Union claiming you can transfer money to the recipient’s mobile in minutes. You will need to ensure that the beneficiary has activated their mobile wallet with one of Western Union’s partner mobile operators in that country. At most, your recipient will receive the money within 2 days with this method. Finally, if you’re sending the money to the beneficiary’s bank account, it will likely take two working days at most for them to receive it. That said, Western Union does offer a faster service which you can find out about here. Western Union also stipulates that if you wish to send more than £799.99 within a five-day period, you will first need to confirm your identity with them, after that, they will allow you to send up to £4000 within a three-day period, and up to £50,000 per transfer with their faster payment option, though this may vary from firm to firm.   Money Transferring Firms you Can Use Western Union Azimo TransferWise   Foreign Exchange Brokers Foreign exchange brokers are said to be the best for large, one-off payments above £3000. It is suggested that they are great for payments for overseas mortgages or large purchases. They are also great because there are often no fees, or very low fees, particularly on large amounts of money, and their exchange rates tend to me more competitive than those of banks or money transferring firms, giving you the best value for money if you intend to send a lot of cash in one transaction.    Pros Good for large payments. No charge or low fees for transfers above £3000. Exchange rates are highly competitive. If you are making regular transfers, they may be able to lock you into a set exchange arrangement over a certain period of time, usually a year. Can be faster than transferring money via bank. Generally, offer a bank transfer or cash pick-up. You can manage payments 24/7. Payment generally arrives within 1-2 days. You can opt for priority payment to speed up this process. Transfers can usually be made online or over the phone. Cons They offer less protection than banks, so take care, particularly when transferring large amounts. It’s not worth the cost if you are sending amounts under £1000. Be aware of changes to the exchange rates – they can have a huge impact on the value of large amounts of money.   How to set up a Payment Sending money via this route is straightforward. You will need to open an online account, which is usually free to do, and will generally need to verify your identity during this process. Depending on the brokers, you will then state how much money you wish to transfer, and they will try to secure you the best exchange rate. Once they have offered you a rate and you have confirmed that you are happy and send them the funds to transfer, provide them with the details of your recipient’s bank account and they will process the payment and send it to the beneficiary. You will then receive a confirmation once the payment has been transferred. They generally accept money via bank accounts or debit or credit cards including Visa, Master Card and Maestro. Some brokers state that money can be transferred within a few minutes to a few days, like with previous methods, this will vary depending on the country and broker.   Foreign Exchange Brokers Currencies Direct Global Reach Moneycorp   Things to Note With all three of these options, it is important to note that your recipient may be charged to receive or collect the money you have sent. Sometimes, you can opt to pay these charges yourself, but it will be dependent on the company or bank. Registered or Authorised? As previously mentioned, transferring money via a bank is the safest method, as if anything happens to that bank, your money will be safe. This may not be the same with some firms and brokers. When researching firms and brokers you will see that all UK services will be registered or authorized by the Financial Conduct Authority. This is incredibly important to understand as it will give you some insight into how well protected your money will be if a firm or broker goes bust. Being authorised means that a firm or broker MUST keep your money separate from the company’s own money and accounts, meaning that if something happens and the company goes under, your money should be recoverable. If a broker or firm is registered, the directors of the company need only prove that their business is based in the UK and that they have no past financial criminal convictions, which means your money may not be kept separate from the company’s own accounts and funds, therefore, making it less easily identifiable, and less easily retrievable if the company goes bust. It is also important to be aware that unless they state otherwise on their website, some brokers and firms will not be covered by the Financial Services Compensation Scheme. This means that if a company goes under and does not have the funds to pay you back, you will not be able to claim for compensation under the Financial Services Compensation Scheme. So where possible, we would strongly advise ensuring that a firm or broker is covered.   Finally, it is important to note that we are not financial advisors, and this article is merely a guide. Please consult a professional for further information.   Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor who has decided that you would like our support in securing an NHS service post, email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you in securing an NHS job and on your relocation journey. Are you a member of our Facebook group? When you join IMG Advisor, you will join a community of doctors all looking to join the NHS and relocate to the UK. We post a series of blog and vlogs to the group every day. We will also be on hand to answer all your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 60 videos covering everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS. Listen to BDI Resourcing on the go with IMG Advisor the Podcast! You can listen to us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher and Buzzsprout. We have a number of episodes with tips and advice on relocating to the UK and the routes you can take to achieve this.   References Hsbc.co.uk. (2020). Currency Transfer - Send Money Abroad | HSBC UK. [online] Available at: https://www.hsbc.co.uk/international/money-transfer/ [Accessed 27 Jan. 2020]. Westernunion.com. (2020). How to send money abroad from £0 fee | Western Union UK. [online] Available at: https://www.westernunion.com/gb/en/send-money-abroad.html [Accessed 27 Jan. 2020]. Postoffice.co.uk. (2020). International Money Transfer | International Payments | Post Office. [online] Available at: https://www.postoffice.co.uk/international-money-transfer [Accessed 27 Jan. 2020]. Meadows, S. (2020). International money transfers: what is the safest way to send money abroad?. [online] The Telegraph. Available at: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/money/consumer-affairs/international-money-transfers-safest-way-send-money-abroad/ [Accessed 27 Jan. 2020]. MoneySavingExpert.com. (2020). Sending Money Abroad. [online] Available at: https://www.moneysavingexpert.com/banking/foreign-currency-exchange/ [Accessed 27 Jan. 2020]. The Telegraph. (2020). The cheapest way to send money abroad. [online] Available at: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/money/transferwise/the-cheapest-way-to-send-money-abroad/ [Accessed 27 Jan. 2020].

Our Top 5 Tips for coping with lockdown

By Alice Howe
May 27, 2020

Whilst we are beginning to see the lockdown measures in the UK ease, we are aware that certain aspects of lockdown and self-isolation will remain the same for the foreseeable future. The following article aims to outline BDI Resourcing’s Top 5 tips for coping in Lockdown.   Keep Active An absolute ‘must’ during lockdown! Here in the UK, you are allowed out of your house (as long as you are social distancing) for unlimited amounts of outdoor excersize. Whether you fancy a long run, a fast walk, a relaxing bike ride or even a workout in the garden –keeping active is a great way to ward of the psychological issues associated with being in lockdown. Doing a form of exercise helps lower stress hormones and promotes the release of feel-good hormones, such as endorphin. If you are in the situation where you are having to self-isolate and therefore not leave the house, there are still ways you can stay active and continue a workout routine. Using YouTube or Instagram to watch online workout tutorials is a great way to stay motivated. For a more relaxed form of exercise and a way to keep active, is to participate in some yoga or pilates tutorials. You can even access a lot of online classes provided by personal trainers through skype or zoom! Stay social! One of the most important tips for coping with lockdown is to make sure you’re staying social, which essentially means keeping in touch with friends, family and colleagues. Whilst you may not be able to see others in person and we can’t replace the value of face-to-face interactions, we can be flexible and interact creatively in these circumstances. There is a huge variety of applications that are free to use in order to contact or video call your loved ones.   Popular applications to use for online quizzes, video calls and even joint workouts include Skype, Facetime, Zoom, WhatsApp, Microsoft Teams, Facebook Messenger and Google Hangouts. Baking/Cooking One very popular hobby that we think is a great idea to explore and try to master during lockdown is baking and/or cooking! If you find yourself with a bit more time on your hands and in need of cheering up, now is the perfect opportunity to experiment with some new recipes – with thousands available for free online! Cooking is therapeutic and rewarding, providing an activity that also rewards us with something (hopefully) delicious to eat at the end of it. Reading The importance of reading at the moment cannot be understated – it gives us all a way to relax, bond with our families, enjoy time alone and escape the current situation. Many people are using the current lockdown situation to curl up on the sofa at home, or in gardens while it’s sunny, and lose themselves in fiction.   Keep up to date with your studies Last but not least, one very important thing to do during lockdown is to make sure you are keeping up to date with your studies. Whether this means revising your CV, revising for PLAB or a Royal College examination.. whatever it may be.. this is important for both your mental health and your future goals. We are aware that due to the Covid-19 pandemic the majority of exams have been cancelled or delayed – thus, giving you extra time to be used efficiently towards preparation and ensuring you have the relevant study materials. Please note, BDI Resourcing have a variety of useful Blogs and Vlogs that can be found on our Facebook, our website and our YouTube channel, that might come in handy when revising!

What to expect working in Emergency Medicine in the NHS

By Alice Howe
May 13, 2020

Emergency Medicine, also referred to in the UK as A&E, ER and ED, is arguably the most in demand specialty within the NHS. Working as an Emergency Medicine Doctor in the NHS gives you the opportunity to secure jobs offering competitive salary, excellent career progression and access to specialty training.   What should I know? Emergency physicians will be expected to liaise with other specialties, coordinating the initial phase of a patients journey through the hospitals A&E department. They also interact with many people during the shift, including patients, nurses, relatives, junior doctors, consultant colleagues, ambulance crews and even the police. One very important thing to note, is that Doctors working in Emergency Medicine should expect to do an appreciable amount of night time and weekend work as ED’s are open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, making this a very demanding and rewarding specialty.   Where will I be based? On a general basis, if you are a Doctor working in Emergency Medicine you will predominantly be in the specific hospitals A&E department, however some posts will be carried out in trauma centres, walk-in centres and in-patient hospitals.   What is the difference between Emergency Departments and Trauma Centres? The Emergency Department is where patients go when they need emergency assistance, whether it be a sprained ankle, a heart attack or a stroke. In this way, the ED is a varied unit that has the facilities, doctors and expertise to handle almost any ‘emergency’ medical situation. Trauma Centres are normally located within the ED, however some major units will be separate from the hospital. Here they handle the most extreme Emergency cases or life-threatening injuries. Here you’ll find highly trained physicians who specialise in treating traumatic injuries, who will include: Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgeons Neurosurgeons Cardiac Surgeons Radiologists Nurses   As a method of comparison, the following table aims to highlight the difference in medical cases in both Trauma and ED units:   Emergency Department Trauma Centre Broken Bones Fainting or loss of consciousness Heart attacks Burns Strokes Severe vomiting/diarrhoea Severe pains Gunshot and stab wounds Major burns Serious Road Traffic Accidents Blunt trauma Brain or Head Injuries Amputations Relocating to the UK If you are an international Emergency Medicine doctor who would like to relocate to the UK , email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you in securing an NHS post and on your relocation journey to the UK. Are you a member of our Facebook group? When you join IMG Advisor, you join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs to the group each day. We will also be on hand to answer all of your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 60 videos covering everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS. Listen to BDI Resourcing on the go with IMG Advisor the Podcast! You can listen to us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher and Buzzsprout. We have a number of episodes with tips and advice on relocating to the UK and the routes you can take to achieve this. Finally, we have just launched our new Instagram, so if you are a member, feel free to follow us to view our posts and IGTV: @bdiresourcing   References Unitypoint.org. 2020. ER Vs. Trauma Center: What's The Difference? (Infographic). [online] Available at: <https://www.unitypoint.org/livewell/article.aspx?id=cafe17aa-df46-410c-9b6d-7855bf760f83> [Accessed 12 May 2020]. UPMC HealthBeat. 2020. What Is A Trauma Center? | Trauma System Levels | ER Or Trauma?. [online] Available at: <https://share.upmc.com/2016/05/what-is-a-trauma-center/> [Accessed 12 May 2020]. London Ambulance Service NHS Trust. 2020. Emergency Trauma Care - London Ambulance Service NHS Trust. [online] Available at: <https://www.londonambulance.nhs.uk/calling-us/emergency-trauma-care/> [Accessed 12 May 2020].

How to Get British Citizenship

By Samantha Joubert
May 01, 2020

If you have lived and worked in the UK for a number of years or are planning to remain in the UK on a long-term or permanent basis, you may wish to apply for British Citizenship. Some of the benefits of obtaining British citizenship are that you will be eligible to receive free healthcare from the NHS, you will be granted access to unemployment allowances, you’ll have the right to vote and you can apply for a British passport. In this article, we will shed some light on what makes someone eligible to apply for British citizenship and the requirements necessary for the application process.   Eligibility There are a few different circumstances that may make you eligible to apply for British citizenship, these depend on your status within the country and how long you have lived within the UK. You may be eligible to apply for citizenship if: You have Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR) If you have Permanent Residence status You have ‘settled status’ under the EU settlement scheme You’re married to or in a civil partnership with a British citizen There are some requirements specific to each of circumstances listed above which will determine whether or not you’re eligible to apply, we will explain these in further detail later in this article.   General Requirements No matter what your circumstances are, there are some overarching requirements that you must comply with, such as evidencing your English skills and completing certain tests. So, whether you have IRL or are married to a British citizen, you will need to adhere to these conditions. The most basic requirements that require little explanation are: You must intend to continue living in the UK on a long-term basis You must be 18 years of age or older   Evidencing your English Language Skills This should be a familiar requirement as it will have been necessary to obtain GMC Registration, and to get your Tier 2 Visa as well. In order to apply for British Citizenship, you will also be expected to prove your knowledge of English, Welsh or Scottish Gaelic skills, depending on where you’re hoping to settle. To evidence your English language skills, you can either use UK NARIC, or you will need to pass a Secure English Language Test (SELT). If you passed IELTS in order to obtain GMC Registration, you will be able to use this as proof of your English language skills, even if has since expired. You will need to provide a certificate or evidence of your score. Unfortunately, the OET is not currently accepted by the Home Office, so if you passed OET for GMC Registration and your Visa application, you will need to sit either IELTS or the Graded Examinations in Spoken English (GESE). It may be a relief to know that you will only need to achieve a score of 4 in IELTS in order to be eligible to apply for British Citizenship, unlike the score of 7.5 necessary for GMC Registration. GESE, on the other hand, is slightly different to IELTS as you will be able to take tests at different grades. You will need to achieve a pass in a GESE grade 5 test in order to be eligible to apply for British Citizenship, if you pass a GESE test of a lower grade, this will not be accepted by the Home Office. You can learn more about GESE on the Trinity College website.   Life in the UK Test Before you can apply for British Citizenship, you will also need to pass the Life in the UK Test. The purpose of this test is to ensure that anyone applying for citizenship has sufficient knowledge and understanding of British history, society and values to make them a good candidate to obtain citizenship. The test itself is computer based, consisting of 24 questions and will take roughly 45 minutes to complete. You can only book the test online, on the gov.uk website, and must book at least three days in advance. The fee is currently £50, which you will pay during the booking process. There are over 30 test centres in the UK, so it should be relatively easy to find one nearby. In order to go through with your booking, you’ll need an email address, credit or debit card and an accepted form of ID such as a passport, UK driving license (full or provisional), certificate of identity document, EU identity card, immigration status document endorsed with a UK residence permit that has a photograph or your biometric residence permit. It’s also important to ensure that the name you input when booking your test matches the name on the document you intend to use as identification. On the day of the test, you must take the same form of identification you used to book your test. You will also need to provide proof of address, this can be a gas, electricity or water bill, a council tax bill, a letter from the Home Office, a UK photocard driving license (full or provisional), a bank or credit card statement. Whichever document you use as proof of address, it must not be the same document you used for proof of identity, it must be the original document rather than a copy, and it must include your name, address and postcode, and be dated within three months of the day of your test. In order to pass and to be eligible to apply for British Citizenship, you will need to score 75%. If you pass, you’ll be sent a letter notifying you of this, and this is the document you must send to the Home Office in order to prove that you have passed this test and meet the criteria to apply. Once again, you must send the original document, not a copy. The best way to prepare for the Life in the UK Test is to purchase the handbook, as this book covers any questions that may come up on the test. You can order the handbook here.   Good Character Assessment The Gov.UK website states that to be eligible to apply for British Citizenship, candidates must be ‘of good character’. This essentially means that during your time living in the UK, you have abided by and been respectful of UK laws and fulfilled any relevant obligations and duties of being a UK resident such as paying income tax and making national insurance contributions. As well as this, if you have breached any of the UK immigration laws in the past ten years, this will reflect badly on your character.   Proof that You have Lived in the UK for Several Years One of the basic requirements to apply for citizenship is that you have lived in the UK for a number of years, usually five. The only exception to this rule is if you are applying for citizenship because you are married to a British citizen, you will only need to have lived in the UK for three years in this situation. You will be expected to provide evidence that you have lived in the UK for five (or three) years and that you were actually in the country five (or three) years prior to your application. Documentation you can use as proof includes tax documents such as your P60 or a P45, a letter confirming your employment from the hospital you were working in at the time, council tax bills, mortgage statements, tenancy agreements, bank statements or pension statements from your employer at the time. Extra Requirements if you have Indefinite Leave to Remain or Settled Status ILR and Settled Status have identical requirements, if you are a member of the EU, EAA or Switzerland, ILR may be referred to as ‘settled status’ or ‘indefinite leave to remain under the EU Settlement Scheme’. If you hold either of these, in addition to the general requirements listed, you must also have lived in the UK for five years, as mentioned previously, and have held ILR or settled status for 12 months prior to your application. It is important to note that you won’t be eligible to apply for British Citizenship if you have: Been outside of the UK for more than 450 days during the five years prior to your application. Spent more than 90 days outside of the UK in the last 12 months. Have broken any immigrations laws.   Extra Requirements if you are Married or in a Civil Partnership with a British Citizen As previously mentioned, if you are applying for citizenship because your spouse is a British citizen, you will be an exception to the five years of residency rule. In order to apply, you must be able to prove that you have lived in the UK for three years, prior to your application. To apply for citizenship, you will also need to have one of the following: A document proving you have permanent residence status in the UK. Indefinite leave to remain in the UK. Settled Status (also referred to as ‘indefinite leave to remain under the EU Settlement Scheme’). Indefinite leave to enter the UK (permission to move to the UK permanently from abroad).   You will not be eligible to apply for British Citizenship if you have: Been outside of the country for more than 270 days during the last three years prior to your application. Spent more than 90 days outside of the UK in the last 12 months. Broken any UK immigration laws. If your spouse who was a British citizen has died.   Extra Requirements if you have Permanent Residence status Under this circumstance, you will need to prove your status by providing a permanent residence document. You can apply for this document on the Gov.UK website. As previously mentioned, you must have lived in the UK for at least five years prior to your application and must have held permanent residence status for at least twelve months. You will not be eligible to apply for British Citizenship if you have: Been out of the UK for a period of two years or more since obtaining your permanent residence status. If you have been outside of the UK for more than 450 days in the last five years. If you have been outside of the UK for more than 90 days in the last twelve months. Broken any UK immigration laws.   How do I Apply? The application fee is £1,330, you will also have to pay an additional £19.20 to have your biometric information, consisting of your photograph and fingerprints, taken. If you meet all of the requirements and have completed the relevant tests, you will need to fill in an application form on the Gov.UK website which can be found here.   Citizenship Ceremony The final step in the process of obtaining British Citizenship is attending a Citizenship Ceremony. If your application has been accepted and you have provided the Home Office with the necessary documentation, they will send you an invitation to attend a citizenship ceremony. Upon receiving your invitation, you must book to attend a ceremony within three months, and you can do this with your local council. These events tend to be group ceremonies and cost £80, though it is possible to book a private ceremony, if you would prefer, but it will be more expensive, and the price varies depending on the local council’s rules. You will also be permitted to invite two guests, if you wish. During the ceremony you will make an oath of allegiance to God (you may choose your religion), and a pledge that you will respect the laws, freedoms and rights of the UK. If you are not religious, you are also permitted to make an affirmation instead. At the end of the ceremony, you will be presented with your certificate of British Citizenship and a welcome pack, so if you don’t attend the event, you won’t be granted British Citizenship.   Relocating to the UK If you’re an international doctor with plans to relocate to the UK and join the NHS, email your cv to [email protected] and we would love to help you on your journey to the UK. Are you a member of our Facebook group? When you join IMG Advisor, you join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs into the group every single day. We will also be on hand to answer all your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 50 videos on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS! Listen to BDI Resourcing on the go with the IMG Advisor Podcast! You can find us on Apple Podcast, Spotify, Stitcher, and Buzzsprout. We have a number of episodes with tips and advice on relocating to the UK and the routes you can take to achieve this.   References Gov.uk. (2019). British citizenship - GOV.UK. [online] Available at: https://www.gov.uk/browse/citizenship/citizenship [Accessed 11 Dec. 2019]. Ukcitizenshipsupport.com. (2019). Explore the Benefits of Obtaining British Citizenship. [online] Available at: https://ukcitizenshipsupport.com/british-citizenship-info/british-citizenship-benefits/ [Accessed 11 Dec. 2019]. Citizensadvice.org.uk. (2019). Preparing to apply for pre-settled and settled status. [online] Available at: https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/immigration/staying-in-the-uk-after-brexit/preparing-to-apply-for-pre-settled-and-settled-status/ [Accessed 11 Dec. 2019].  

State vs Private Schooling - What is the difference?

By Alice Howe
March 18, 2020

Education is an important part of raising children and preparing them to live successful lives and we understand that if you have children, finding the right school for them is a crucial step of your relocation journey. In this blog, we have identified the main differences between Private and State Schools in order for you to have a wider understanding of education within the UK.   Funding The main and most obvious difference between State and Private schools is how they are funded. Whilst State schools are financed by the government, Private Schools are largely financed by school fees paid by parents. This means that tuition fees for Private Schools tend to be high and expensive. On the other hand, private schools often have more financial aid access and consequently can award scholarships. On average, Private Secondary School Fees in the UK per year for day pupils are £15,000, whilst a boarder would pay £33,000.   Boarding As previously mentioned, some parents opt to pay more in order to have their children ‘board. A boarding school provides education for pupils who live on the premises, as opposed to a day school. The majority of UK boarding schools are private however there are a few state schools in the UK where students can board for an additional price. For Private schools, you will need to pay for tuition and boarding.  Boarding fees generally cover items such as accommodation, food and drink and laundry. It is important to note that every school is different and consequently we advise Asking the schools that you are interested in what they offer in their ‘boarding package’.   Class Size Private schools do tend to be much smaller in size than State Schools, and thus may provide a more interactive and personal learning experience for students. The average class size in Secondary schools in the UK is currently 22 pupils, decreasing to 14 pupils at A-Levels whilst private schools may range from 8-15 pupils.   Subjects While a Private school might be more desirable due to class sizes, this might also result in fewer subject choices within the curriculum. Whilst the curriculum will always contain Core and STEM subjects, such as Science, Maths, English, Languages, I.T, History and Geography, there will be less choice of specific subspecialties within the curriculum for students.     Applications The application process for state schools is generic. You must apply through your local authority for a place at a primary or secondary school, even if it’s linked to your child’s current primary school. Most local authorities will ask for a list of three or four schools in order of preference, however London requests six. If your child qualifies for more than one of the schools, you will be offered a place for the school that is highest on your list. If you want to apply to a private school, you will need to check out their specific websites as each establishment will have its own specific process. It is advisable to plan a few years ahead if you have a specific private school in mind, as many secondary private schools will have ‘feeder schools’, from which they take the majority of their first year intake. If you ae considering private education, visit the website of the Independent Schools Council. Both Private and State schools will have their own admissions criteria. It is important for you to read the admissions criteria you look the look of, before filling in your application form. If you do not meet one of the first few criteria bands of the school you apply for, you are most unlikely to get a place.   Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor who would like to relocate to the UK and join the NHS, email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you in securing an NHS post and on your journey to relocate to the UK. Are you a member of our Facebook group? When you join IMG Advisor, you join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs to the group every day. We will also be on hand to answer all of your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 60 videos covering everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS. Listen to BDI Resourcing on the go with IMG Advisor the Podcast. You can listen to us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher and Buzzsprout. We have a number of episodes with tips and advice on relocating to the UK and the routes you can take to achieve this.                                                                                                                             References Study-uk.britishcouncil.org. (2020). Boarding schools | British Council. [online] Available at: https://study-uk.britishcouncil.org/find/study-options/boarding [Accessed 12 Feb. 2020]. ThoughtCo. (2020). Public vs. Private Schools: 5 Major Differences. [online] Available at: https://www.thoughtco.com/major-differences-between-public-and-private-2773898 [Accessed 12 Feb. 2020]. Writer, S., Walsh, J., Walsh, J., Walsh, J. and Walsh, J. (2020). Private School vs. State School: Which Would Work Best for You? - Peterson's. [online] Peterson's. Available at: https://www.petersons.com/blog/private-school-vs-state-school-which-would-work-best-for-you/ [Accessed 12 Feb. 2020].  

How to Build your Credit Score

By Alice Howe
February 12, 2020

When you relocate to the UK, no matter how much credit history you managed to build in your home country, you will essentially be starting from scratch in the UK. As such, there will be certain things you won’t immediately be able to do once you arrive in the UK, for example, you won’t be able to apply for a mortgage, loan or even particular types of phone contract at first. In this article, we will explain the best ways to build up your credit rating to allow you to apply for credit and work towards buying a house in the future. Please note that we are not financial advisors and this article is merely a guide. Please consult a professional if you would like further information.   What is a Credit Score or Rating? Your credit score or credit rating is what a potential lender would use to assess you to ensure that you are a good investment. When you first arrive in the UK, you will likely have a poor credit score, purely because you do not have any credit history. There is a myth that you have a fixed credit score, however, different lenders may use slightly different methods to assign a credit rating to you, and these may vary slightly from lender to lender. Essentially, their assessment will determine whether they’re willing to lend you money, if you’ve had any credit products in the past, how reliable you were at paying money back, how much they are willing to lend you and how much interest you will be charged. You may wonder why having no credit history means that you have a poor credit rating, the reason for this is that lenders have no way to assess if you will be a good and safe investment for them, if you look at it from the lender’s perspective, they only want to lend to people who will reliably pay their money back, this is why it is important to start building your credit score as soon as possible.   How can I build my Credit Score?   Get a UK Address This will likely be something you do quite soon after you arrive in the UK anyway, so it will hopefully be an easy win! Having a fixed, UK address is an excellent way to start building your credit score. The reason for this is that in order to borrow money from any lender, you will require a permanent residence. As well as this, they can use this information to confirm your identity, and if you have multiple forms of credit further down the line, they will likely check that all of your credit agreements are linked to the same address to ensure that you are not a fraudster.   Keep Your Accounts up to date Linking on from the previous point, once you do have accounts, it is important to ensure that you keep these up to date, inform the bank if you change your address. It may seem like a small thing, but having the wrong address listed on accounts can have a big impact on any credit applications you make, as previously mentioned, this is one way that lenders check your application is legitimate, if they see you have multiple addresses listed, even if this is an old address, they could deny your application for fear that it is not legitimate.   Open a UK Bank Account It can be tricky to open a UK bank account initially as you will need proof of address in order to open an account, and you need a UK bank account to secure accommodation! If you have not yet secured accommodation, this can be a hindrance. That said, there are now online banking services such as Monzo that only require a passport and video of yourself to open them.  For more detailed information on how to open a UK bank account, you can read one of our previous articles. Once you have opened a bank account, this can be a great and simple way to build credit. Make sure to maintain it by ensuring that, if possible, you always have enough money in your account to cover your payments and bills each month. This is beneficial as it shows lenders that you can maintain a responsible relationship with a bank. As an alternative to applying for a credit card, in certain situations, banks may offer you an interest-free overdraft for the first 12 months of being an account holder, this is a great way to build credit so long as you ensure to always pay it off in full before the end of the interest-free period.   Set Up Direct Debits This one goes hand-in-hand with the previous point. Set up direct debits for your bills and rent to ensure that they are paid on time as any late or missed payments could cause issues when you are applying for credit.   Provide Proof of Employment This may seem like an easy one, but being able to prove that you are in a stable job with a regular income will give your credit score a little boost, as it proves to lenders that you have the means to pay them back. Once you have been receiving regular pay into your bank account for a few months, this can help you to apply for credit.   Get a Mobile Phone Contract You may not be able to do this immediately as you may need to build a little credit first, or you may only be able to apply for a SIM only contract to begin with. You can learn more about acquiring a phone contract in our previous article about things to do when you first arrive in the UK. This would be considered a small credit account, so you will not need to build as much credit to open a phone contract as you would, for say, a mortgage. Ensure that you pay your phone bill on time every month, and this will show lenders that you can reliably make repayments.   Get a Credit Card Once again, it is unlikely that you will be able to do this as soon as you arrive in the UK, as you will likely need some credit history to actually be eligible for a credit card, so it might be worth waiting a few months until you’re settled and have been regularly following some of the previous steps. If you would like to find out how to get a credit card, you can read our recent article on the matter. In order to get a good credit card with a low interest rate, you will need a good credit rating…so unfortunately, your first credit card will likely have a high interest rate, it’s estimated that 34.9% is the most common interest rate for these types of cards. It is advisable that prior to applying for a credit card, you check which cards you will be eligible for. You can use Money Saving Expert’s calculator to check your eligibility without negatively impacting your credit score. Once you have acquired a credit card, it is incredibly important to ensure that you use it responsibly and make your repayments on time each month so that you don’t need to pay interest. The best way to make use of it to build your credit is to use it for payments you were already going to make and have the money set aside for, such as rent or bills. It is also highly recommended that you do not withdraw any cash on your credit card as it can be seen by lenders as poor money management. In addition, the interest is higher, and you will be charged for doing this, even if you repay this in full. In doing this, you will be able to demonstrate that you can be trusted to make credit repayments. Try to only use a small amount of your credit limit, the average you’re recommended to use is about 25%-30%. For example, if your credit limit is £500, try not to spend more than £125. If, for any reason, you are struggling to repay your credit card on time, make sure that you contact your lender and ask if you can change your repayment schedule, it may have a negative impact on your credit score, but not as much as missing payments or continuing to pay late will. If you find that later down the line, you are not using a credit card, it is also important to cancel it, as if you have access to too much credit, even if you are not using it, can reflect badly on you when you apply for other forms of credit.   Check your Credit Report for Errors It is important to regularly check your credit report for errors. If you find any incorrect information, ensure that a notice of correction is added to your file. To check your credit report, you will need to order a copy of your credit file online, you will usually be charged a small fee from this, and you can order your file from the following agencies: Experian, Equifax and TransUnion.   Don’t Submit Credit Applications Too Frequently It is important not to apply for too much credit in a short space of time, as this can have a negative impact on your credit rating. Where possible, try to space out any applications you make so that it doesn’t appear you are bad at handling money and need to rely on credit.   Don’t get a Pay Day Loan The Money Saving Expert website warns against applying for pay day loans, reportedly, these companies claim that this can be a good way to build credit, however, there interest rates are generally ridiculously high, and can end up getting you into debt, rather than improving your credit score.   Register to Vote Admittedly, this one won’t be very helpful to you when you first arrive, as you will need to obtain British Citizenship in order to have the right to vote. However, if you have been in the country for five years you may be eligible to apply for British Citizenship which allows you the right to vote and apply for a British passport. If you are looking to improve your credit score and you have British Citizenship, this can be a great way to give your rating a boost, as it is one way that lenders can confirm your identity and address.   What can Lenders Find Out about me? You might be wondering what information lenders will be able to obtain about you, and why. We will list what lenders will be able to see below, it is important to note that the reason they can learn this information about you is so that they can ensure you are a reliable person to lend money to.   What Information is Included in my Credit Score? Your name Your address and postcode Your date of birth Past credit applications Credit repayment history, including late or missed payments Any existing debt you have If you are on the electoral role If you have any joint credit cards or loans If you have been declared bankrupt or have an IVA Any county court judgements (CCJ’s) Current account turnover   What Information is Not Included in my Credit Score? Student loans Medical history Council tax arrears Criminal record Parking or driving fines   It can seem daunting and even frustrating to have to completely rebuild your credit score once you arrive in the UK, particularly if you are hoping to secure a mortgage to buy a house later down the line. While it can be discouraging, take your time and follow these tips and gradually, you will be able to build up a good credit score, which is sure to benefit you in the long run. If you would like further advise on managing your credit or other financial matters, we would advise that you speak to a professional.   Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor who would like to relocate to the UK and join the NHS, email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you in securing an NHS post and on your journey to relocate to the UK. Are you a member of our Facebook group? When you join IMG Advisor, you join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs to the group every day. We will also be on hand to answer all of your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 60 videos covering everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS. Listen to BDI Resourcing on the go with IMG Advisor the Podcast. You can listen to us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher and Buzzsprout. We have a number of episodes with tips and advice on relocating to the UK and the routes you can take to achieve this.   References Lewis, M. (2018). Credit Scores. [Online]. MoneySavingExpert.com. Available at: https://www.moneysavingexpert.com/loans/credit-rating-credit-score/ [Accessed 30 Jan. 2020.]. Saxon.H. (2018). Build Your Credit History. [Online]. MoneySavingExpert.com. Available at: https://www.moneysavingexpert.com/loans/build-credit-history/ [Accessed 30 Jan. 2020.]. Moneyadviceservice.org.uk. (2020). How to get credit for the first time. [Online]. Available at: https://www.moneyadviceservice.org.uk/en/articles/getting-credit-for-the-first-time [Accessed 30 Jan. 2020.]. http://www.facebook.com/katsgoneglobal (2019). How to Build a Credit Score as a New UK Resident. [Online] Kats Gone Global. Available at: https://katsgoneglobal.com/credit-score-new-uk-resident/ [Accessed 30 Jan. 2020.].  

A Guide to: The British Countryside

By Gabrielle Richardson
January 30, 2020

A Guide to: The British Countryside The countryside holds a special place within English life and culture. Although most Brits work in the city, the countryside remains for most people in Britain an idyllic place and a place where one can both live and relax in their free time. For most people, the British countryside provides endless access to historic sites, memorials, monuments, protected areas, pretty villages and pub gardens. In this blog post, we share the five reasons to visit the British countryside when you relocate to the UK and join the NHS. Spectacular Views When you first visit the British countryside, you will find the views “charming, quaint, lovely and picturesque”. When you first visit the English countryside, you will be overwhelmed with plenty of greenery, country inns, moss-covered walls, hedged roads and rolling hills. Historical The British countryside represents natural beauty; however, a fun fact is that it is artificial and uniquely designed via landscaping over hundreds of years by the British people, who hold a 1000-long-year obsession with gardening. You can travel to the countryside by train The United Kingdom’s rail system is one of Britain’s greatest features, with over 20,000 passenger services per day. Most UK getaways are easily accessible by train and explorable by foot once you arrive and often it is a journey of no more than a couple of hours from the nearest airport. Trains are a great way to travel because you can purchase advance tickets for a cheaper price or last minute if your plans suddenly free up and you find yourself wanting to explore. On British trains, you can bring your own food and drinks, you can spread out and travel with comfort, set out your laptop and catch up on some life admin or even play some card games – and of course, enjoying the beautiful countryside out of the window! You should note that some places in the countryside do require a car to get to. However, you could always travel by train, bus and then get a taxi if need be to the specific location that you are visiting. Range of activities The fantastic thing about the NHS countryside is that is the range of fun activities you can do! Whether you have a passion for hiking, playing golf, surfing in Wales, touring a winery, visiting an auto-museum or rock-climbing – there is something for absolutely everyone. Pub Lunch After you have completed a 10-mile hike or bike ride, a hearty Sunday Roast or a classic British dish: beef burgers with mature cheddar cheese and crisp chips, homemade Cumberland sausage with onion gravy and mashed potatoes or roasted pork with spiced apple sauce; you will be spoilt for choice. If you are a vegetarian, the UK has plenty of fantastic veggie-friendly options from grilled halloumi to roasted butternut squash. Fun Facts about the British Countryside There are 10 National Parks in England: Dartmoor, Exmoor, New Forest, South Downs, The Broads, Peak District, Yorkshire Dales, North York Moors, Lake District and Northumberland. Wales and Scotland have just 5 National Parks between them: Brecon Beacons, Snowdonia and Pembrokeshire Coast in Wales and the Cairngorms and Loch Lomond and the Trossachs in Scotland. The 15 National Parks have two purposes – conserving and enhancing their natural and cultural heritage and promoting the understanding and enjoyment of the qualities of the parks to the public Britain has few endemic (native) species, due to the closeness to mainland Europe. Britain’s only poisonous snake is the adder The number of magpies in Britain and Ireland has quadrupled in the last 30 years Yorkshire is the most Instagrammed location in Britain, followed by the Scottish Highlands and the Shetland Islands Walking is Britain’s most popular outdoor recreation, with almost a third of the adult population walking at least two miles a month Nowhere in the UK is more than 70 miles from the coast   Relocation to the UK If you are interested in relocating to the UK’s countryside or a major city, email your CV to us at [email protected] and we can help you secure the most perfect NHS post. Are you a member of our Facebook Group? When you join IMG Advisor, you will join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs into the group every single day. We will also always be on hand to answer all your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 60 videos on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS! References Furfeatherandfin.com. (2020). Facts About the British Countryside and Coast | Fur Feather and Fin. [online] Available at: https://www.furfeatherandfin.com/blog/facts-about-british-countryside-coast/ [Accessed 28 Jan. 2020]. BuzzFeed. (2020). 9 Reasons Why You Need To Visit The British Countryside. [online] Available at: https://www.buzzfeed.com/visitbritain/reasons-why-you-need-to-visit-the-british-countryside [Accessed 28 Jan. 2020].      

How to get a credit card if you are new to the UK

By Gabrielle Richardson
January 24, 2020

When you first move to the UK, it will be hard to get a credit card, a financed car, get a mortgage or get a bank loan. This is due to the lack of a credit history you have in the UK. Unfortunately, you cannot transfer your credit rating from your home country to the UK. So, you will essentially be starting again. Without a present credit history, lenders won’t have any information on you to determine whether you can manage credit responsibly and may therefore class you as high risk, making them reluctant to lend to you. In this blog post, we share how to build up some positive credit history in the UK to help you with your short-term goals such as obtaining a credit card or long-term goals... buying a house! Please note, we are not financial advisors and this blog post is simply a guide. Please consult a professional for further information. What is included in my credit score? Name, address and date of birth Past credit applications Credit repayment history, including late or missed payments Your existing debt Your electoral register presence Any joint credit cards or loans If you have been declared bankrupt or have an IVA Any county court judgements (CCJ’s) Current account turnover What is not included in my credit score? Student loans Medical history Council tax arrears Criminal record Parking or driving fines Step 1: Employment Most lenders require evidence of proof of a regular income. So, being employed by the NHS you will be able to evidence a consistent income. Step 2: Get a UK address Most lenders will not give you credit without proof of a UK address. So, the first step is to secure a permanent residence. Please note, when you go to open a UK high street bank account you will need to show proof of address. If you are yet to secure permanent accommodation, you can evidence your Air B n B’s address. Step 3: Open a UK Bank Account Although this is not essential to apply for credit, it is advisable that you open a bank account in the UK as it will make you more attractive to lenders. Having a UK bank account means that you can pay bills by direct debit, receive your salary and transfer money abroad. If you would like our advice on how to open a bank account in the UK, please do read our blog post here. Step 4: Create some Positive History in the UK If you can show that you manage credit responsibly, you are more likely to get better interest rates in the future. You have a number of options available to you when you first arrive: Open a high interest credit card – Make sure that you spend little each month, pay back in full and stay within your credit limit otherwise it will have a negative effect on your credit rating. Example high interest cards, please check with each provider as rates regularly change. The Aqua Card – Typical 35.9% APR variable and up to 51 days interest free credit on purchases if you pay off your balance in full and on time each month The Capital One Classic: Typical 34.9% APR variable The Barclaycard Initial: Typical 27.9% APR variable Put bills in your name (where possible) and pay them by direct debit Open a couple of store cards as they are usually easier to get than standard rate credit cards but always pay them off in full every month and you got another way to show you can handle your finances responsibly. Step 5: Time your applications wisely Applying for lots of credit in a short space of time and being rejected is not good for your credit rating. You can try leaving between three and six months between applications to hep repair your credit rating, however, the process will take longer. One example is a mobile phone contract, car insurance, car finance and a credit card can count towards this. Step 6: Curb your card spending When you do get issued a credit card, you should try to minimise any debt on your cards. As a rule of thumb, you should try to keep the debt on a card under 30% of your credit card limit. Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor who has decided that you would like our support in securing an NHS service post, email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you in securing an NHS job and on your journey to the UK today. Are you a member of our Facebook Group? When you join IMG Advisor, you will join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs into the group every single day. We will also always be on hand to answer all your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 60 videos on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS! References Focus, E. (2020). Moving or Moved to the UK? A Guide to Credit and Financial Freedom | Expat Focus. [online] Expatfocus.com. Available at: https://www.expatfocus.com/guide-to-credit-and-financial-freedom-in-the-uk [Accessed 22 Jan. 2020].  

Tips for Saving Money on your Energy Bill

By Samantha Joubert
January 22, 2020

As it’s Big Energy Saving Week, we wanted to share some tips on ways that you can reduce your energy bill, and more importantly, do your bit to save the planet. According to BP’s Statistical Review of World Energy, in 2018, “energy consumption growth was driven by natural gas, which contributed to more than 40% of the increase.” As such, any change we can make to reduce our energy consumption can only be beneficial.   How can I use less water?   Spend One Minute Less in the Shower Energy Saving Trust.org reports that if every person in a family of four spent one minute less in the shower each day, they could save an impressive £75 a year on energy bills! So, if someone in your family takes long showers, imagine how much money could be saved if they cut five minutes off their shower time!   Use a Washing up Bowl Instead of running water continuously to wash your dishes, fill a washing up bowl with water and wash your dishes in the bowl. This may seem like you’re using more water, but you’d be surprised how much water is wasted just by leaving the tap running whilst washing your dishes!   Turn the Tap off! It can be easy to forget, but try to turn the tap off whilst you’re brushing your teeth, shaving or washing your face, and you could save 6 litres of water every minute by making this small change to your morning and evening routines!   Use your Washing Machine for one less Cycle Try to reduce the amount of times you use your washing machine a week, by doing even one less cycle, you can make a surprising difference to your energy bill.   Only Fill the Kettle with the Water you Need Instead of filling the kettle up to the maximum level each time you use it, only fill it up with as much water as you need at a given time.   Replace your Shower Head Change your shower head to a water efficient one, and you could save yourself £70 a year on gas and a whopping £115 a year on your water bill, not only will this make a huge difference in saving the planet, but you could put that money towards something else.   Monitor your Taps! Energy Saving Trust.org has reported that dripping taps can waste more than 5,300 litres of water a year! As such, make sure that your taps are properly turned off, and its recommended that you regularly change the washers on your taps if you notice that they’re beginning to drip.   How can I use Less Electricity?   Use Energy Efficient Bulbs Where possible, try to replace standard lightbulbs with energy efficient LED bulbs. This change could save you £35 on your yearly energy bill.   Buy Energy Efficient Appliances In the UK, many appliances come with energy grades, with A+++ being the best for the environment and your energy bill, and G being the worst. When it’s time to replace your current fridge, dishwasher or washing machine, or if you’re just relocating to the UK and looking to buy new appliances for your home, try to buy products that have an energy rating of A+++ if possible, to save yourself the most money on your electricity bill.   Switch Off Try to remember to switch lights off if you’re not using them, as well as other electrical appliances such as TVs, computers, and even chargers. By switching lights off when you’re not using them, you could save £14 a year on energy bills. Also, if you have an appliance in standby mode, make sure to switch it off, this could save you £30 a year. This might not seem like a lot, but these small changes combined with others on this list can add up at the end of the year!   Wash Clothing on a Lower Temperature Where possible, try to wash your clothes on a lower temperature, such as washing on 30 degrees instead of 40 degrees. Many newer washing machines now have ECO cycles and energy saving settings that you can utilise as well.   How can I use Less Gas?   Set a Timer If your central heating system allows you to set the time that the heating comes on, utilise this so that it only heats the house when you’re home and doesn’t waste energy by warming the house when no one will be home to benefit from this.   Turn Your Thermostat Down If possible, try to turn your thermostat down by one degree, this small change can save you an impressive 10% on your energy bill at the end of the month!   Close Blinds and Curtains in the Evening This is likely something you do anyway, but did you know that by closing blinds and curtains around your house in the evening, it prevents heat from escaping out of the house through the windows?   Seal any Cracks in Windows, Doors and Skirting Boards Following on from the previous tip, you can save £20 a year on your energy bill by sealing up any cracks or draughts in windows, doors and skirting boards and you can prevent heat from escaping your home.   Get Double Glazing and Insulate your Home Double glazed windows provide less room for heat to escape from your house than single glazed windows do, and can save you £110 a year on energy bills. If possible, also try to get your roof and loft insulated, again, whilst this can be costly initially, by doing this, less heat will escape from your home, and you can save yourself up to £135 a year by doing this, so it is actually beneficial in the long run.   Install a Smart Thermostat Smart thermostats can save you money as they will only heat the rooms you are spending time in, and they can learn how long it takes to heat your home so that your property is heated efficiently. Having a smart thermostat installed can save you £75 a year!   Monitor Your Usage Our final recommendation is to monitor your energy consumption. An easy way to track your usage is to have a smart meter installed in your home, this way, you can easily see where your energy consumption is highest, and make plans to reduce this.   How Much Could I Save a Year? The amount you could save on your energy bills a year will vary vastly depending on how many of these tips you decide to follow, how many people are in your family, the size of your home and the kind of energy saving techniques you may already have in place, so we cannot give you a definitive answer. However, we will strive to give you a very rough estimate based on a family of four. Energy Saving  Money Saved Using a washing up bowl £12 Reduce washing machine use by 1 cycle £12 Only fill kettle when needed £12 Spend 1 minute less in the shower a day £75 Replacing your shower head with an energy efficient one £185 Switch to energy efficient lightbulbs £35 Switch off lights when you're not using them £14 Switch off appliances in standy £30 Seal up draughts in doors, windows and skirting boards £20 Get double glazing put in £110 Insulate your roof and attic £135 Have a smart thermostat installed £75 Total Saved: £715 As you can see, if you make some small changes to your daily habits, and some changes to your home, you can save a great deal of money each year, money that could be put towards a holiday for your family, or something you’ll all enjoy, with the added benefit of doing your part to save the environment.   Relocating to the UK If you’re an international doctor hoping to relocate to the UK and join the NHS, email your CV to [email protected] and we would be happy to help you on your relocation journey. Are you a member of our Facebook group? When you join IMG Advisor, you join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs to the group every day. We will also be on hand to answer all of your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 60 videos on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS! Listen to BDI Resourcing on the go with IMG Advisor the Podcast! You can find us on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify and Buzzsprout. We have several episodes with tips and advice on relocating to the UK and the routes you can take to achieve this. Keep your eyes peeled for the second season of our podcast, coming soon!   References Bp.com. (2020). [online] Available at: https://www.bp.com/content/dam/bp/business-sites/en/global/corporate/pdfs/energy-economics/statistical-review/bp-stats-review-2019-full-report.pdf [Accessed 22 Jan. 2020]. Energy Saving Trust. (2020). Big Energy Saving Week 2020. [online] Available at: https://energysavingtrust.org.uk/big-energy-saving-week-2020 [Accessed 22 Jan. 2020]. Moneysupermarket.com. (2020). Energy Saving Tips | How To Reduce Bills | MoneySuperMarket. [online] Available at: https://www.moneysupermarket.com/gas-and-electricity/energy-saving-tips/ [Accessed 22 Jan. 2020].  

Ofsted: UK School Inspection Report

By Gabrielle Richardson
January 17, 2020

Ofsted stands for the Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills. It is an independent body that reports directly to Parliament. Ofsted inspects services in the UK that provide education and skills for learners of all ages. Each week, Ofsted carry out hundreds of inspections and regulatory visits throughout England publish the results online. The body has around 1,800 employees across 8 regions: East Midlands East of England North East, Yorkshire and Humber North West South East South West West Midlands London Ofsted is responsible for: The inspection and regulation of educational institutions including independent schools, state schools, academies and childcare facilities The inspection of agencies responsible for adoption, fostering and other social care services The inspection of other services for children and young people Carry out research on education and social care Reporting on the above institutions and relaying the information to the government What is an Ofsted rating and why is it important to me? When you are researching into the school that you want your child to attend, it is essential to look at the school’s Ofsted rating as it will give an indication into its quality of teaching and pupils’ achievements. There are four Ofsted ratings: Grade 1: Outstanding An outstanding school provides exceptionally well for the needs of its pupils and prepares them for the next stage of their education or employment at the highest possible level.  Grade 2: Good A good school provides well for the needs of its pupils and prepares them effectively for the next stage of their education or employment. Grade 3: Requires Improvement A school that requires improvement is not inadequate, but neither is it satisfactory. Grade 4: Inadequate An inadequate school has significant weaknesses and is failing to prepare its students effectively for the next stages of their lives. The management and leadership, however, are judged to be Grade 3 and above. To search for a school’s Ofsted report, click here. When you are reading a school’s report, look out for their scores in: Leadership and management Behaviour and safety of pupils Quality of teaching Achievement of pupils Summary Final judgements Please note if you are relocating to Wales, the school inspection body is called Estyn - https://www.estyn.gov.wales/ If you are relocating to Scotland, you can search their reports here - https://www.mygov.scot/school-inspection-reports/ Northern Ireland can be found here - https://www.etini.gov.uk/ Childcare If you are a doctor that has children younger than school age, please have a read of our blog post on the childcare options available in the UK. Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor who has decided that you would like our support in securing an NHS service post, email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you in securing an NHS job and on your journey to the UK today. Are you a member of our Facebook Group? When you join IMG Advisor, you will join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs into the group every single day. We will also always be on hand to answer all your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 45 videos on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS! References Engage Education. (2020). What is OFSTED? | Educational Standards - Engage Education. [online] Available at: https://engage-education.com/blog/video-article/ [Accessed 14 Jan. 2020].

How to open a UK Bank Account

By Gabrielle Richardson
January 09, 2020

Having a local bank account is essential for life in the UK; your NHS salary will be paid directly into it, you will need it to obtain a mobile contract, set up household bills and a debit card to pay for every day life. In this blog post, we discuss the documents you will need, fees and charges involved, how to choose which high street bank to bank with and credit cards. It is important to note that there is no legal barrier to opening a UK bank account as an international doctor, but each bank does have its own products which come with different rates, terms and conditions. So, you should always read the fine print before you agree to open an account with them. Documents needed To open a bank in the UK, you will need to evidence your identity, address, salary and your biometric residence permit (BRP). This allows banks to maintain their security and ensure accounts are not used for illegal activity. 1. Proof of Identification To evidence your identity, you will need to show a current photo ID. Typically, doctors use a valid passport to do so. Other documents are accepted such as your driving licence or your BRP. 2. Proof of Address Each high street bank has their own list of documents that they will accept for your proof of address. So, you will need to double check exactly what your chosen bank requires before you visit the branch to open up your account. Typically, doctors use an Air B n B address or hospital accommodation. 3. Salary As you will not have an available credit history, the bank may ask you to provide evidence of your yearly salary. You can obtain this evidence from your hospital’s HR department. Try and obtain this letter before you attend your appointment at the bank. 4. BRP Evidencing your BRP is needed to confirm your right to reside in the UK. Doctors typically receive their BRP 3-7 days after arriving. All documents must usually be original, issued within the last three months and show your full name and UK address. The Application Process The process can differ slightly depending on the bank. We advise that you call the branch in ahead of attending in person and confirm the documents that you need to open up an account. The typical steps are: Collect all of the required documentation Complete the banks application form Book an appointment at a local branch of your choice Attend your appointment to show your original documents Make a deposit It can take a few days for your bank card and security number (PIN) to arrive in the post Please note, it can sometimes take a week or two to book an appointment in busy high street branches i.e. in major cities, so, planning ahead is essential. How much does it cost? Opening up a UK bank account is typically free; however, you may be required to have a certain amount paid into your account each month. With regards to ATM fees, typically high street cash machines are free to use if you have a UK-issued debit card. However, ATM machines you find in airports, train stations or pubs may charge a fee for cash withdrawals, usually around £1.50-3 per transaction. The machine will always notify you that there is a charge to use the service so, do check the screen before you enter your card and PIN. How to choose your high street bank Everybody’s banking needs are personal. If you have a healthy balance with lots of savings, you may be interested in the bank that pays the most interest. Or potentially, to aid your relocation you might seek a bank that does not charge for you to use their overdraft facilities. Click here to compare high street banks. Monzo Monzo was established in 2016 and it is a bank that will live on your smartphone and it is completely free to use. The bank allows you to sort your salary when you get paid into spending, saving and bills. You are able to set specific spending budgets for different categories, such as your food shop, entertainment or eating out so, you can track how well you are doing for each month. There are two main advantages to Monzo. The first is that you can withdraw up to £200 per month abroad for free, from £200+ you will be charged 3%. Second, you can open up an account by simply uploading your passport and a video of yourself to the app. Applications are usually accepted in 1-2 days. For further information, please click here. How I open a UK bank account from overseas? Depending on what country you are residing in, you may be able to open up a UK bank account from overseas. Many British banks have a correspondent banking relationship with countries overseas. These accounts are designed for non-residents, so they are the perfect option if you cannot evidence a UK address. Barclays, Lloyds, HSBC and NatWest offer international accounts. However, typically opening an international account from outside the UK can require a large initial deposit and you must commit to pay in a minimum amount of money each month. Some banks will charge you a monthly fee in addition to these requirements. Can I get a UK credit card? As you will be new to the UK, you might have difficulty getting access to credit, even if you did have good credit history in your home country. Credit reference agencies in the UK do not share data with similar agencies overseas, so when you first arrive in the UK, it is essentially like you are “invisible” to lenders and because they do not have any record of what you are like with money, therefore you might find it is harder to take out a credit card and loans. If you have made an application for credit but been refused, it is not sensible to make too many applications. Lots of applications in a short space of time could damage your credit history, even if you have not been successful with your applications. What can I do? If you had good credit in your home country, you could contact your bank manager and ask them to provide you with a reference to your local branch in the UK. You could also consider applying for a “Credit Card Builder”, a credit card available for those building their credit. You should note that these cards often have higher interest rates, with the average interest rate 30% (January 2020). Click here to compare cards. Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor who has decided that you would like our support in securing an NHS service post, email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you in securing an NHS job and on your journey to the UK today. Are you a member of our Facebook Group? When you join IMG Advisor, you will join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs into the group every single day. We will also always be on hand to answer all your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 45 videos on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS! References The Telegraph. (2020). Tips for opening a UK bank account. [online] Available at: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/money/transferwise/how-to-open-a-bank-account-in-uk/ [Accessed 6 Jan. 2020]. Vanquis.co.uk. (2020). Getting a Credit Card as a New UK Resident - Vanquis. [online] Available at: https://www.vanquis.co.uk/understanding-credit/financial-problems/overseas-uk-credit-rating [Accessed 6 Jan. 2020].

Renting a Property in the UK

By Samantha Joubert
January 02, 2020

Once you have found a property to rent in the UK, you may be wondering what your responsibilities as a tenant are, and what your landlord’s responsibilities will be. In this article, we will be explaining what will be expected of you, what you can expect of your landlord, what to do at the end of your tenancy, and who you should contact if any issues arise during your tenancy.   Before Moving In Documents Prior to moving into the property, there are several documents that your landlord must provide you with. We covered which documents your landlord will need from you in a previous article. Firstly, and most importantly, you should make sure that you receive a written tenancy agreement from your landlord. This should specify the length of your tenancy, what changes you can and can’t make to the property, and the notice period required should you wish to end the tenancy early. Before you sign this agreement, ensure that you have read and understood the terms. If you are uncertain about anything in your tenancy agreement, seek advice from Shelter before you agree to sign. We would also recommend that you ensure your tenancy agreement includes a break clause. A break clause allows you to give your landlord notice if you wish to leave the property before the end of your tenancy without incurring any fees for breaking the terms of your contract. It will usually mean that if you wish to leave, you will need to provide your landlord with a set notice period in writing, and will ensure that when your notice ends, your tenancy will end, your right to live in the property will end and you will not be liable for ongoing rent. A break clause will also generally state a given period of time that must pass before you are able to make use of this clause, for example, it may state that you can offer a month’s notice after you are six months into your contract. If you would like to learn more about break clauses, you can read about them on the Shelter website. You and your landlord should agree to a check-in report or inventory before you move into the property. An inventory will outline any furniture, appliances or belongings that the landlord is leaving in the property for the use of tenants, and if damaged at the end of your tenancy, your landlord may keep part, or all your deposit as compensation for any damage to these items. It is advisable to take photographs of any belongings left in the property by your landlord, prior to you moving in, just in case there is any dispute about the condition of these objects at the end of your tenancy.  Once you move in, take meter readings at your earliest convenience, this is to ensure that you don’t end up paying for any of the previous tenant’s bills. Finally, ensure that your landlord follows a code of practice. A code of practice ensures that a property is of a good quality and high standard. You can read about the code in detail here.   Documents your Landlord Should Provide you with There are several documents your landlord should provide you with either before you move in, or within the first month or so of you residing in the property. Contact Details Perhaps most importantly, your landlord or letting agency should provide you with contact details should you need to contact them in an emergency or about any issues that may arise with the property. Legally, you can be made aware of your landlord’s name and address.   Renting Checklist As mentioned in our previous article about renting, your landlord should provide you with a copy of the renting checklist. This checklist is a document outlining what you should be aware of throughout the renting process and should help you to remain aware of your rights and responsibilities, as well as the rights and responsibilities of your landlord.   Gas Safety Certificate Gas safety certificates confirm that any appliances fueled by gas within the property have been checked and are safe for your use. You should receive a copy of this when you first move into the property. Checks should be completed annually, something your landlord will be responsible for arranging, and you should also receive a certificate within 28 days of each gas safety check.   Deposit Paperwork If your landlord or agency has requested a deposit, it is the responsibility of your landlord to protect it in a government approved scheme within 30 days of receiving the deposit, and they should inform you of any information regarding this. It is also important for you to understand how you will get your deposit back at the end of your tenancy, so be sure to discuss this with your landlord or agency when you first pay your deposit.   Energy Performance Certificate The energy performance certificate determines the cost of energy bills for a property, unless the property is multiple occupancy, where common areas such as the kitchen and living room are shared by multiple tenants. Properties rented after April 1st, 2018 must have an energy performance rating of E.   Electrical Inspection Records Electrical appliances provided by the landlord in a property should be checked every five years, and so you should receive a record of the most recent inspection to ensure that all electrical appliances within the property are safe.   Evidence that Smoke Alarms and Carbon Monoxide Alarms are Working Your landlord should also provide evidence that any smoke detectors or carbon monoxide alarms are in working order before you move in. All properties should contain a smoke detector on each floor of the property, so if this is missing, you should request that your landlord install them. If the property you intend to move into has a woodburning stove or fireplace, then it should have a carbon monoxide alarm in addition to the previously mentioned smoke detectors.   Responsibilities During your tenancy, both landlords and tenants have certain responsibilities. We will go into detail about these, but to give you a brief idea, landlords have a responsibility to ensure that their property is safe and habitable for tenants, and tenants have a responsibility to respect and maintain the property.   Tenant Responsibilities   Pay your Rent on Time Your main responsibility as a tenant will be to pay your rent on time. Generally, tenants will pay rent monthly, but in certain circumstances, it is possible to pay an annual fee instead.  If you fail to pay your rent within 14 days, you may have to pay a default fee. It’s also likely that if you continually fail to pay your rent, your landlord will evict you for breaking your tenancy agreement.   Pay your Bills As well as your rent, it will also be your responsibility to pay your council tax, gas, electricity and water bills, unless your tenancy agreement states that these bills are included in your rental agreement.   Maintain the Property It is important to ensure that you maintain the cleanliness and condition of the property where you can. Whilst the landlord will be responsible for larger issues, you should be considerate of the property, cleaning regularly and completing smaller tasks such as changing lightbulbs. If you wish to redecorate, you should consult with your landlord beforehand to ensure that they are happy for you to make changes, or to discuss what changes you can or can’t make. If any appliances provided by the landlord break, or if any plumbing, electrical or structural issues arise, make sure to contact your landlord immediately so that they can resolve these issues promptly. Whilst it is the landlord’s duty to ensure that any issues are resolved, you will be equally responsible for reporting any problems. It is also advisable to take out contents insurance, as even if your landlord has insurance, it likely won’t cover your personal possessions, only the possessions provided by the landlord.   Be Considerate of Neighbours If you will be living in a property where you will have neighbours, it is important to be respectful of your neighbours by ensuring that you are not disruptive (e.g. playing loud music late at night) or anti-social (harassing or threatening your neighbours). If your landlord receives reports that you have exhibited disruptive or anti-social behavior, it is possible that they may take actions to evict you.   Subletting Subletting is when a tenant rents the property, or a room in the property, out to someone else. Generally, this practice is illegal as the landlord is often not made aware that their property is being let out by the tenants. If you do wish to sublet the property you are living in, make sure to seek permission from your landlord, and if they refuse, do not proceed with plans to sublet.   Be Aware of the Property When you first move into the property, ensure that you are aware of how to operate the boiler and any appliances provided to you by the landlord. It will also be your responsibility to ask where the stopcock, fuse box and meters are.   Test the Smoke Detectors and Carbon Monoxide Alarms Whilst it is the landlord’s responsibility to ensure that smoke detectors and carbon monoxide alarms are installed and that they are functioning when you initially move in, it will be your responsibility as the tenant to test these detectors on a monthly basis. If you find any issues with one of the detectors, you should report it to your landlord immediately.   Landlord Responsibilities   Maintain the Exterior, Structure and Safety of the Property The landlord is responsible for ensuring that the property you are living in is structurally sound, and safe for habitation. If you have any concerns or find any issues with the property, always contact your landlord.   Fit Smoke Detectors and Carbon Monoxide Alarms As previously mentioned, smoke detectors should be installed on each floor of a property, and if there is a wood or coal burning oven or fireplace available in the property, a carbon monoxide alarm should also be installed. If either of these is missing, you should request your landlord to have them put into the property.   Water, Electricity and Gas Issues If any issues arise with the water, electricity or gas supplies, you should report this to your landlord, and it will be their duty to send someone to the property to fix this.   Gas Safety Check As mentioned in the documents section of this article, your landlord should arrange for an annual gas safety check to be carried out and inform you of this, as it is likely that you will either need to be home to let someone in to carry out these checks, or the landlord themselves will need to be present during the check if you aren’t available.   Maintain Furniture and Appliances and Provide Repairs If your landlord has supplied you with any appliances or furniture, it will be their responsibility to maintain these items and ensure that they are functioning correctly. If one of these appliances breaks or malfunctions, ensure that you notify your landlord so that they can have it repaired or replaced. As well as the appliances and furniture supplied by the landlord, if any issues arise with the property itself, it is generally the landlord’s responsibility to have these issues repaired, unless otherwise specified in your tenancy agreement.   24 Hours’ Notice for Visits If, for any reason, the landlord needs to come to the property for repairs or any kind of visit, they are legally required to give you at least 24 hours’ notice prior to this. Even though the landlord owns the property, they aren’t allowed to enter the property without giving you the specified amount of notice.   Maintain Energy Efficiency As previously stated, your landlord will need to provide you with documentation outlining the energy efficiency of the property. The landlord will need to ensure that the minimum energy efficiency is in band E, unless the property is exempt from this.   Insuring the Property The landlord’s final responsibility is to insure the property to cover the costs of any damage caused by fire or flood.    Ending your Tenancy At the end of your tenancy, you’ll usually either wish to extend your tenancy, or leave the property. In both situations, there are steps that both you and your landlord will need to complete.   Extending your Tenancy If you decide you’d like to remain in the property, and your landlord is happy for you to do so, you will either need to sign a new fixed term contract, the way you did initially, or you could opt for a rolling tenancy. A rolling tenancy allows you to continue living in the property but with no fixed term date. In this situation, your tenancy agreement with the landlord should state how much notice you will need to provide the landlord with should you wish to leave, the notice period will generally be one month. It is also possible that if you extend your tenancy, your landlord may wish to increase the cost of rent, which they are entitled to do before you sign a new tenancy agreement, but they must inform you of this change and include it in the new agreement before you sign it.   If you Want to End your Tenancy If your landlord wishes to end your tenancy, they are legally required to give you proper notice, at least two months usually, and must have allowed any fixed term period of the tenancy to have expired. If you decide you want to end your tenancy early, you may be charged for this as you will be breaking your contract. It should stipulate in your tenancy agreement how much notice you need to provide your landlord with in this situation, but it is generally one month. The property will be inspected once yourself and your landlord have decided that you wish to end the tenancy agreement, this inspection will determine if any of your deposit will be deducted due to damages to the property. The gov.uk website recommends that you be present for this inspection. If you disagree with the outcome of an inspection, you can contact the relevant deposit protection scheme to appeal. Here are a few of the deposit protection schemes in place: Deposit Protection Service MyDeposits Tenancy Deposit Scheme You should also ensure that all your rent and bill payments are up to date prior to leaving, if they are left unpaid, it could have a negative impact on your credit rating and if you wish to obtain a reference from your landlord. During the process of vacating the property, make sure that you clean the property thoroughly, as well as removing all of your possessions, even if there are items you don’t intend to take to your new home with you, remove and dispose of any wanted belongings. If you leave any of your personal belongings in the property, the landlord is entitled to dispose of them after 14 days, though they must inform you that they intend to do this. Finally, ensure that you take meter readings, return any keys to the landlord, and provide your landlord with a forwarding address should they need to contact you or forward any post on to you after you have vacated the property.   Issues During or After your Tenancy Major issues can usually be avoided if you do your research whilst searching for a property to rent and before signing a tenancy agreement, however sometimes problems can arise during your tenancy that are beyond your control, and it is useful to know who to contact in those situations. It should be noted that if possible, it is always best to discuss any problems with your landlord or letting agency first, as often they can find a quick resolution to any worries or issues you may have.   Letting Agencies If you have any complaints about the letting agency you are dealing with, and the letting agency itself can’t resolve this for you, it is possible to make a complaint to the Independent Redress Scheme, and they should be able to better advise you.   Landlords If you find that you are having difficulties with your landlord that can’t be resolved by discussing the issue directly with them, you should report the issue to your local authority, you can find yours here. Examples of difficulties with your landlord are: Your landlord refusing to repair the property when the conditions are unsafe. If your landlord attempts to evict you without valid reason or without providing written notice as stipulated in your tenancy agreement. If your landlord unfairly retains your deposit at the end of your tenancy. If your landlord makes unannounced visits or harasses you (if you feel threatened or unsafe, it is recommended that you call 999).     Financial Difficulties Sometimes, circumstances beyond your control may prevent you from being able to afford the cost of your rent. It is vital to speak to your landlord as soon as possible in this situation, as they are likely to be more understanding if you are honest with them from the outset and may be able to offer you some help and advice. If the issue is potentially going to be a long term problem, it is wise to contact Citizens Advice or Shelter for further advice.   Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor with plans to relocate to the UK and join the NHS, email your CV to [email protected] and we would love to help you on your journey to relocate to the UK. Are you a member of our Facebook group? When you join IMG Advisor, you join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs into the group every single day. We will also be on hand to answer all your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 50 videos on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS! Listen to BDI Resourcing on the go with the IMG Advisor Podcast! You can find us on Apple Podcast, Spotify, Stitcher and Buzzsprout. We have a number of episodes with tips and advice on relocating to the UK and the routes you can take to achieve this.   References Rla.org.uk. (2019). [online] Available at: https://www.rla.org.uk/documents/download.shtml?pid=3414&v=3cf1a0fb170ac7ad4569f80fba7bfe39 [Accessed 30 Dec. 2019]. GOV.UK. (2019). How to rent: the checklist for renting in England. [online] Available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/how-to-rent/how-to-rent-the-checklist-for-renting-in-england [Accessed 30 Dec. 2019]. England, S., advice, H. and renting, P. (2019). How to end a fixed term tenancy early. [online] Shelter England. Available at: https://england.shelter.org.uk/housing_advice/private_renting/how_tenants_can_end_a_fixed_term_tenancy [Accessed 30 Dec. 2019].

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