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What to expect when working in OBGYN in the NHS

By Alice Howe
July 08, 2020

Obstetrics and gynaecology is concerned with the care of pregnant woman, her unborn child and the management of diseases specific to women. The specialty is particularly appealing as it combines both medicine and surgery. Working in women’s health is a stimulating and rewarding career. Childbirth is an important event for any woman, and obstetricians are central to providing support and ensuring safety in maternity care It is important to note that this is a very competitive area of medicine and thus in order to secure the best career opportunities for yourself, we would always advice the MRCOG route to GMC Registration.   Can I subspecialise? O&G is a wide-ranging specialty with an extensive training programme that opens up lots of different career paths. Similarly to other specialties, O&G is a run through training programme lasting seven years. In the final two years of training (ST6-ST7), Doctors are expected to complete a subspecialty programme. The below table aims to outline the four recognised subspecialties and the common associated procedures for each.   Sub Specialty   Gynaecological Oncology Providing specialist care to patients with gynaecological cancers (Ovarian/Uterine/Cervical/Vulval/Vaginal), initiating interventions for all stages and contexts of the disease. Common procedures - (Total Laparoscopic hysterectomy (TLH), Groin lymph node dissection, Open para-aortic lymph node dissection, Laparotomy for stage 3/4 Ovarian Cancer, Vulvectomy, Radical Hysterectomy (open and Lap), Small bowel resection +/- anastomosis, Large bowel resection, Diaphragm/peritoneal resection/stripping) Maternal and Fetal Medicine Providing ultrasound to screen for pregnancy complications, fetal abnormalities and common conditions affecting the fetus. You will be managing a wide range of maternal medical conditions and pregnancy complications The main three points of focus within this subspecialty are Amniocentesis, Fetal Echocardiography and Chorionic Villus Sampling Urogynaecology Providing specialist care to patients with pelvic floor dysfunction, performing non-surgical and surgical treatments Common procedures – (Cystoscopy/Posterior Repair/Sacrocolpopexy/Sacrospinous Fixation/Urodynamics/Vaginal Hysterectomy and Anterior Repair/Laparoscopic Sacrocolpopexy) Reproductive Medicine Providing specialist care for women with endometriosis, managing endocrinological disorders, treating reproductive, early pregnancy and fertility problems through surgery and assisted conception Common procedures – (Hysteroscopic Surgery, Laparoscopic Adhesiolysis, Laparoscopic treatment of endometriosis, Laparoscopic Ovarian Cystectomy, Laparoscopic Salpingectomy, Laparoscopic Salpingostomy and Myomectomy)   Where will I be working? Due to the varied nature of the specialty, you will be expected to work in a range of environments, which may include practicing in an antenatal or gynaecology outpatient clinic, an operating theatre, a labour ward, a scanning clinic or specialist clinic. There are also many opportunities to work closely with the community, both in obstetrics, gynaecology and sexual and reproductive health where there is a significant public health aspect to the work. User input in maternity services is very active. Some doctors in this specialty now work completely in the community.   What else should I expect? There is no typical day in Obstetrics and Gynaecology but most trainees and an increasing number of Consultants in the NHS will work on a shift system. They will begin their shift by undertaking ward rounds, seeing inpatients, new admissions and arranging any required investigations. A large part of the job will be contributing to the multidisciplinary team on the labour ward, which is a 24/7 service. Teaching and training medical students and trainees is an important part of a consultant’s working week. They may also undertake research. Most consultants work during the daytime and are on call out-of-hours on a regular basis. Most trainees work on a shift pattern.   Relocating to the UK If you are an international Obstetrician or Gynaecologist who would like to relocate to the UK , email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you in securing an NHS post and on your relocation journey to the UK. Please note, Obstetrics and Gynaecology is an extremely competitive field and thus NHS Trusts are fairly successful with their own recruitment processes. With this in mind BDI Resourcing mostly specialize in finding Consultant Obstetrics and Gynaecology positions but we can certainly keep your CV on file should an appropriate NHS position arise. Are you a member of our Facebook group? When you join IMG Advisor, you join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs to the group each day. We will also be on hand to answer all of your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 60 videos covering everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS. Listen to BDI Resourcing on the go with IMG Advisor the Podcast! You can listen to us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher and Buzzsprout. We have a number of episodes with tips and advice on relocating to the UK and the routes you can take to achieve this. Finally, we have just launched our new Instagram, so if you are a member, feel free to follow us to view our posts and IGTV: @bdiresourcing   References: Health Careers. 2020. Obstetrics And Gynaecology. [online] Available at: [Accessed 1 July 2020]. Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists. 2020. Considering A Career In Obstetrics And Gynaecology?. [online] Available at: [Accessed 1 July 2020]. Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists. 2020. Gynaecological Oncology Subspecialty Training. [online] Available at: [Accessed 1 July 2020].

What to expect working as a Surgeon in the NHS

By Alice Howe
July 01, 2020

Surgery is a complex specialty due to the broad variation between its surgical specialties. Because of the many options available within surgery, it can offer a demanding and challenging career. It is important to note that surgery is a very competitive area of medicine and thus in order to secure the best career opportunities for yourself, we would always advise the MRCS/FRCS route to GMC Registration.   What can I choose to specialize in? Surgery comprises ten main specialties within the NHS, most of which have further options for sub-specialisations embedded with them. The following table aims to outline each of the 10 specialties and their own sub-specialty branches of medicine –   Sub-Specialties Cardiothoracic Surgery Adult Cardiac Surgery General Thoracic Surgery Congenital Cardiac Surgery Heart and Lung Transplant Surgery General Surgery Breast Surgery Lower Gastrointestinal Surgery Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery Endocrine Surgery Transplant Surgery – Renal/Hepatic/Pancreatic Neurosurgery Paediatric Neurosurgery Neuro-Oncology Functional Neurosurgery Neurovascular Surgery Traumatology Skull-base Surgery Spinal Surgery Oral and Maxillofacial surgery Head and Neck Cancer Craniofacial Deformity and Orthognathic Surgery Gland Surgery Cleft Lip and Palate Surgery Oral Medicine Dentoalveolar Surgery Aesthetic Facial Surgery Jaw Joint problems and Facial Pain Facial Skin Surgery Academic Surgery Otorhinolaryngology (ENT) Otology Rhinology Laryngology Head and Neck Surgery Skull Base Surgery/Neurotology Facial Plastics Paediatric ENT Paediatric Surgery Urology Neonatal Surgery (Some Doctors may have an interest in Paediatric Orthopaedics, Paediatric Cardiothoracic and Paediatric Neuro, but they would be expected to go through Ortho, Cardio and Neuro Training Routes and then subspecialise in Paediatric Surgery) Plastic Surgery Paediatric Plastic Surgery Hand Surgery Congenital Breast Surgery Skin Trauma Cancer Trauma and Orthopaedics Site areas – Foot/Ankle, Shoulder/Elbow, Hand, Upper Limb, Pelvis Joint Reconstruction Orthopaedic Oncology Paediatric Surgery Spinal Surgery Sports Injury Surgery Complex Trauma Surgery Urology Endourology Urological Oncology Functional Urology Andrology Reconstructive Urology Paediatric Urology Vascular Surgery Because this surgical specialty is new, there are no defined sub-specialties as yet.   What should I know?   1) Cardiothoracic Surgery Cardiothoracic surgery is one of the most challenging and demanding areas of surgery. It's also highly competitive with a relatively small number of jobs. Some Cardiothoracic surgeons have a mixed practice across thoracic and adult cardiac but the majority within the NHS specialise in one of these areas. As a Cardiothoracic surgeon you will work closely with cardiologists, oncologists and anaesthesiologists, and have close professional relationships with other non-medical staff such as perfusionists, intensive care staff and operating department personnel.   2) General Surgery General surgery is one of the two largest surgical specialties in the UK (the other being trauma and orthopaedics) employing 31% of the country’s consultant surgeons. The defining feature of general surgeons is that they have a wide range of knowledge and skills to deal with all kinds of surgical emergencies, with an emphasis on acute abdominal problems. They also carry out a large number of elective operations. General surgeons work in smaller hospitals as well as larger teaching hospitals. There are greater opportunities for increased specialisation within large hospitals and specialist units. As a General surgeon you will work with patients of all ages, from babies and children to elderly people.   3) Neurosurgery Neurosurgery is a very challenging surgical specialty where techniques and technologies are constantly developing. Your working day is going to be long – with early starts and late finishes all part of the job. Although surgery is your main responsibility, you will also be evaluating patients in outpatients’ clinics and emergency departments and attending ward rounds. Neurosurgeons are usually based in large regional centres usually attached to teaching hospitals. Most of these are in or near major cities. There are 34 neurosurgical units in the UK. 4) Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery The specialty of oral and maxillofacial surgery is unique in requiring a dual qualification in medicine and dentistry, followed by a comprehensive general and specialist surgical training. Patients can span all ages, but young people aged 15-25 and older people aged 65 plus often predominate. The on call demand is less than other surgical specialties 5) Otorhinolaryngology (ENT) There are around 1476 ENT surgeons working in the NHS, making them one of the biggest surgical specialty within the NHS and this is largely down to the very broad range of skills they cover. ENT has possibly the widest range of operations of any speciality from major head & neck procedures with flaps & complex reconstructions to microsurgery on the ear. Unlike most other surgeons, ENT specialists also act as physicians spending a high proportion of their time running out patient clinics and managing conditions non-operatively through prescribing medicines rather than undertaking surgery. On call demand within ENT surgery is not as high as that required in oth er surgical specialties, making it easier to achieve a good work-life balance. 6) Paediatric Surgery Where other specialties are concerned with a particular technique or area of the body, paediatric surgery is the only surgical specialty that is defined by the patient’s age rather than by a specific condition. The majority of specialised children’s surgery is performed in specific children’s hospitals, or in paediatric surgical units within larger hospitals. There are 29 such centres across the UK, staffed by approximately 338 paediatric surgeons. In these settings, teams of health professionals led by consultant paediatric surgeons provide the necessary services to diagnose, treat and support the rehabilitation of children with various ailments.  Surgery may be planned or emergency. Much of the clinical workload involves children operated on as day-cases. In comparison to other surgical specialties the amount of emergency surgery is relatively low. Consultant paediatric surgeons generally participate in on call rotas of between one in four and one in seven, to include nights and weekends 7) Plastic Surgery Reconstructive procedures are the mainstay of nearly all plastic surgeons’ work: covering all aspects of wound healing and reconstruction after congenital, acquired and traumatic problems, with aesthetic surgery playing a smaller but important part in their working week. Most consultants will specialise in a particular area, although nearly all take part in on-call rota dealing with emergency admissions. Plastic surgeons have a busy emergency workload of soft tissue and limb injuries as well as burns. Emergency plastic surgery also supports the work of other surgeons, dealing with complex wounds from accidents or after other surgical procedures. 8) Trauma and Orthopaedics Trauma can range from low energy fractures (often in elderly patients) to multiple injuries such as those caused by a road traffic accident. Bone and joint infection can also require emergency admission and treatment. T&O surgeons work with patients of all ages from babies to elderly people. T&O surgeons generally spend about 40% of their time operating, and the remainder in outpatient clinics, the emergency department and assessing/monitoring patients before and after surgery. It is important to note that there is more on call work for T&O surgery in comparison to other surgical specialties. Most, but not all orthopaedic surgeons take part in on call rotas to cover the trauma workload. The frequency of on call varies from 1 in 6 to 1 in 12-15 depending on the size of the unit. On call workload will be more intense in bigger units and in designated major trauma centres. 9) Urology Urological conditions are relatively common and account for up to 10% of all GP consultations and up to 20% of all acute hospital referrals. Most urological surgery is elective and urological emergencies are relatively rare. But dealing with acute kidney infections, urinary retention and trauma to the urinary tract can also occasionally be part of a day’s work. You might perform two or three operations during an average half-day in theatre, and see up to eight patients in a morning or afternoon outpatients’ clinic. 10)  Vascular Surgery As a Vascular Surgeon around 40-50% of your surgical work is likely to be emergency surgery and the remainder elective work. When not performing surgery, vascular surgeons undertake a mixture of ward rounds and outpatient clinics. Outpatient and minor interventions may be provided on hospital sites away from the main vascular unit. When you are not working as duty surgeon you could expect to work on an on call basis to deal with emergency cases about one in every six nights/weekends.   Where will I be working? Most surgical work takes place within hospital settings and as well as performing operations, surgeons will also undertake ward rounds, outpatient clinics, administrative duties and teaching. Surgeons have a hugely important role within Emergency and Trauma Departments however dependent on the specific surgical subspecialty, you may be expected to work within separate units, specialized centres or differential departments/hospitals.   Relocating to the UK If you are an international Surgeon who would like to relocate to the UK , email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you in securing an NHS post and on your relocation journey to the UK. Please note, Surgery is an extremely competitive field and thus NHS Trusts are fairly successful with their own recruitment processes. With this in mind, BDI Resourcing mostly specialize in Consultant Surgery positions but we can certainly keep your CV on file should an appropriate NHS position arise. Are you a member of our Facebook group? When you join IMG Advisor, you join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs to the group each day. We will also be on hand to answer all of your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 60 videos covering everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS. Listen to BDI Resourcing on the go with IMG Advisor the Podcast! You can listen to us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher and Buzzsprout. We have a number of episodes with tips and advice on relocating to the UK and the routes you can take to achieve this. Finally, we have just launched our new Instagram, so if you are a member, feel free to follow us to view our posts and IGTV: @bdiresourcing   References: Health Careers. 2020. Surgery. [online] Available at: <https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/explore-roles/doctors/roles-doctors/surgery> [Accessed 23 June 2020]. Royal College of Surgeons. 2020. General Surgery — Royal College Of Surgeons. [online] Available at: <https://www.rcseng.ac.uk/news-and-events/media-centre/media-background-briefings-and-statistics/general-surgery/> [Accessed 23 June 2020]. Royal College of Surgeons. 2020. Plastic And Reconstructive — Royal College Of Surgeons. [online] Available at: <https://www.rcseng.ac.uk/news-and-events/media-centre/media-background-briefings-and-statistics/plastic-and-reconstructive/> [Accessed 23 June 2020]. Royal College of Surgeons. 2020. Ear, Nose & Throat (ENT) — Royal College Of Surgeons. [online] Available at: <https://www.rcseng.ac.uk/news-and-events/media-centre/media-background-briefings-and-statistics/ear-nose-and-throat/> [Accessed 23 June 2020].

What to expect working as a Pathologist in the NHS

By Alice Howe
June 24, 2020

A Pathology career offers a great range of variety and combines both clinical and laboratory work. From investigating infertility to researching neurological disorders, pathology careers are incredibly diverse – each focuses on a different area of prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease. Whilst there are many areas of Pathology that you can choose to have a specific interest in, all jobs in Pathology are very broad and require a detailed knowledge of medicine.   The 5 Areas of Pathology There are 5 main areas of Pathology that an individual can choose to work in, each with their own branch of further sub-specialties and areas of interest. 1) Chemical Pathology (The study of chemicals in the blood) Chemical Pathologists are qualified doctors who combine both laboratory and clinical skills. Their two main roles are to manage the biochemistry laboratories (sample analysis units) and to work alongside any patients who have metabolic disturbances. As a Chemical Pathologist you will be working closely with GP’s (who often request tests) and Endocrinologists (to oversee specialist tests). In general, Chemical Pathologists work with adult patients however some may choose to have a specific interest in Paediatric cases.  The only subspecialty in Chemical Pathology is ‘Metabolic Medicine’ – which explores Inherited Metabolic Disease (MD), the genetic inherited disorder of the metabolism. 2) Haematology (The study of blood disorders) Hematologists diagnose and clinically manage disorders of the blood and bone marrow. There main role is to provide an advisory and consultancy service to all of the hospital specialists and general practitioners whilst also managing diagnostic laboratories and undertaking the care of outpatients and inpatients. As a Haemotologist you will be working with patients of all ages and managing both benign and malignant conditions. You will also be working closely with biomedical scientists and research teams. Many larger hospitals will employ teams of academic Haemotologists.  Within the field of Haemotology there are varying opportunities to develop special interests and subspecialties. These include but are not limited to: Haemoto-oncology Haemostasis and Thrombosis Disorders of Blood Production and Destruction Transfusion Medicine Paediatric Haemotology 3) Histopathology (The study of disease in human tissue) Histopathologists are Doctors who diagnose and study disease using medical interpretation of cells and tissue samples. Histopathology determines the cause of death by performing autopsies and is integral to cancer management through staging and grading of tumours. Working as a Histopathologist in the NHS will mean that you will be a member of the multi-disciplinary team alongside Oncologists, scientists and doctors from other clinical specialties, assessing cancer patients and planning their further investigation into treatments. It is important to note, that in comparison to other branches of Pathology, patient contact may be limited – although you will see patients to explain their diagnosis/treatment or see parents of the deceased to explain the cause of death. As an aspiring Histopathologist you will firstly train in General Histopathology. Once you reach ST3 level you can then choose to have further sub-specialty interests. These include but are not limited to: GI Breast Neurology Dermatology 4) Medical Microbiology and Virology – the study of infection Medical Microbiology and Virology (MMV) are both laboratory based specialties, involving the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of the spread of infection in hospitals and the community. Practicing in either of these specialties will mean that you won’t usually be working directly with patients, but will liaise between clinical colleagues in the hospital, GP’s and other laboratory staff. There are no sub-specialties within medical microbiology and virology however you may have a specific interest in a technique such as nucleic acid amplification or extraction. 5) Immunology (The study of the immune system) The final area of Pathology is Immunology; the diagnosis and treatment of the immune system. Immunologists will often work in specialist laboratories that provide testing for immunological disorders as well as treating people with autoimmunity, immune deficiency and allergies. Immunologists will see patients with possible immune issues, deficiencies and allergies and work in both outpatient and inpatient departments offering ward consultations. Immunologists may develop sub-specialty interests such as: rheumatology HIV medicine transplantation   Where will I be working? Due to the specialism being so multi-disciplinary and having multitudinous strands, as a Pathologist you could work in a large variety of different environments including specialist laboratories, clinics, hospital wards and even histopathology centres. Every blood test, biopsy sample, cancer screening test or search for infection made within the NHS will involve a pathology team and where the team is located depends on the branch of Pathology as stated previously. Relocating to the UK If you are an international Pathologist who would like to relocate to the UK , email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you in securing an NHS post and on your relocation journey to the UK. Are you a member of our Facebook group? When you join IMG Advisor, you join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs to the group each day. We will also be on hand to answer all of your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 60 videos covering everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS. Listen to BDI Resourcing on the go with IMG Advisor the Podcast! You can listen to us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher and Buzzsprout. We have a number of episodes with tips and advice on relocating to the UK and the routes you can take to achieve this. Finally, we have just launched our new Instagram, so if you are a member, feel free to follow us to view our posts and IGTV: @bdiresourcing   References Health Careers. 2020. Pathology. [online] Available at: [Accessed 11 June 2020]. Myworldofwork.co.uk. 2020. Pathologist. [online] Available at: [Accessed 11 June 2020]. Pathologists, T., 2020. Careers In Pathology. [online] Rcpath.org. Available at: [Accessed 11 June 2020]. Pathologists, T., 2020. Immunology. [online] Rcpath.org. Available at: [Accessed 16 June 2020]. Immunology.org. 2020. | British Society For Immunology. [online] Available at: [Accessed 16 June 2020].

What to expect working as a Anaesthetist in the NHS

By Alice Howe
June 17, 2020

Working as an Anaesthetist in the NHS gives you the opportunity to secure jobs offering competitive salaries, career progression, access to specialty training, CESR and CCT. As an international recruitment company, BDI Resourcing recommend that aspiring Anaesthesiologists, wanting to work in the NHS, take the EDAIC or FRCA route to their GMC Registration.   What should I know? Can I specialise? Anaesthesia Doctors are required in various medical disciplines, whether it be for perioperative care, pain management, life support or resuscitation problems. Considering this, Anaesthetists are needed in both inpatient and outpatient departments across all wards of a Hospital. As a specialism on the whole Anaesthesia is most closely linked with Intensive Care and Critical Care medicine however the table below aims to highlight the various stems of Anaesthetist work in which a Doctor can choose to have a specific interest in.   Intensive Care Anaesthetists working in Intensive Care Units will look after critically ill patients suffering from a wide range of serious illnesses or life-threatening infections. They will also look after patients who have had major surgery or after major trauma. Paediatric Anaesthesia Anaesthetists may specialise in the care of children from birth to 16-18 years. Obstetric Anaesthesia Anaesthetists are likely to spend time working on the labour ward providing pain relief and Anaesthetics for Childbirth. Here they will also assess and care for women with complex medical problems that occur during pregnancy Pain Specialists These Anaesthetists care for patients suffering long term pain in order to improve their quality of life. Neuro-Anaesthesia Specialised Anaesthetic techniques are often required in more modern brain surgeries in order to keep the brain in good condition whilst the operation is being carried out. Cardiac Anaesthesia Anaesthetists are often required to work alongside Perfusion teams during open heart surgery to keep the patient Anaesthetised and keep blood pumping to all parts of the patients body. Here, Anaesthetists will also look after the patient in the cardiac intensive care unit, supporting the heart with specialised drugs and/or equipment. Emergency Care and Resuscitation Anaesthetists work closely with the Emergency Medicine department as part of a ‘Trauma Team’. The team ensures that the right care reaches patients quickly. In some circumstances these Anaesthetists will be required to travel by helicopter or road to the scene of major accidents to help with life saving care. Where will I be working? Due to the multidisciplinary nature of the work, as an Anaesthetist in the NHS you can expect to spend time working in theatres, ICU, general wards, emergency wards and specialty wards, depending on the specific interests of your role. You will be working alongside a variety of other medical staffing including specialist doctors and nurses from a wide variety of specialisms including Surgery, Emergency and Medicine.   Relocating to the UK If you are an international Anesthesiologist who would like to relocate to the UK , email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you in securing an NHS post and on your relocation journey to the UK. Are you a member of our Facebook group? When you join IMG Advisor, you join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs to the group each day. We will also be on hand to answer all of your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 60 videos covering everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS. Listen to BDI Resourcing on the go with IMG Advisor the Podcast! You can listen to us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher and Buzzsprout. We have a number of episodes with tips and advice on relocating to the UK and the routes you can take to achieve this. Finally, we have just launched our new Instagram, so if you are a member, feel free to follow us to view our posts and IGTV: @bdiresourcing   References IMG Connect. 2020. Anaesthetics - Working In The UK As An Overseas Doctor | IMG Connect. [online] Available at: <https://www.imgconnect.co.uk/pages/anaesthetics> [Accessed 4 June 2020]. Nationalcareers.service.gov.uk. 2020. Anaesthetist | Explore Careers. [online] Available at: <https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/job-profiles/anaesthetist> [Accessed 4 June 2020]. Medicalprotection.org. 2020. A Day In The Life Of An Anaesthetist. [online] Available at: <https://www.medicalprotection.org/ireland/new-doctor/volume-3-issue-1/a-day-in-the-life-of-an-anaesthetist> [Accessed 4 June 2020]. Accs.ac.uk. 2020. Where Do Anaesthetists Work? | The Royal College Of Anaesthetists. [online] Available at: <https://www.accs.ac.uk/patientinfo/where-do-anaesthetists-work> [Accessed 4 June 2020].

What to expect working as a Radiologist in the UK

By Alice Howe
June 10, 2020

  As a Radiologist, your job is to diagnose and treat disease and injury, using medical imaging techniques such as x-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nuclear medicine, positron emission tomography (PET), fusion imaging and ultrasound. In short, Radiologists are responsible for reporting most imaging procedures and performing most interventional procedures. The job is therefore very rewarding, since many conditions such as Cancer can often be identified, diagnosed and treated. As an international Radiologist you are likely to be expected to enter into the NHS at Consultant level, as this is a Consultant-led.   What should I know?   Whilst Radiologists do spend a very large amount of their working week writing imaging reports, they do have contact with a variety of people, whether it be the wide range of specialist doctors, radiographers and other healthcare professionals or patients and their families. You will have more contact with patients, especially if you work in ultrasound, fluoroscopy or breast imaging. Additionally, it is important to note that on-call work can be particularly busy as a Radiologist, particularly if you work between sites. You will be working under pressure, often undertaking emergency procedures, writing reports and communicating results to medical colleagues.   A Normal Day for a Radiologist Working as a Radiologist within the NHS will mean that no two days are the same. However, normal daily tasks for radiologists in the UK may include: Obtaining patient histories from patient interviews, electronic records, referring clinicians or dictated reports Preparing comprehensive reports of findings Performing diagnostic imaging procedures, such as MRI, CT, PET, ultrasound or mammography Reviewing the information gathered from diagnostic imaging procedures Communicating the results of the diagnostic information to physicians and patients Performing interventional procedures including percutaneous transluminal angioplasty, nephrostomy catheter placement, image-guided biopsy or transhepatic biliary drainage. During such tasks you will likely be exposed to radiation, infections and disease and thus will be required to wear specialised protective equipment often.   Roles: There are various areas of specialist interest within Radiology which include: Breast Cardiac Emergency Gastrointestinal Head and Neck Interventional Musculoskeletal Neuroradiology Oncology Paediatric Thoracic Vascular Uro-Gynaecological It is important to note that whilst these interests are encouraged by the NHS, the only subspecialty that is recognised by the GMC for separate specialist registration to become a Consultant in the UK is interventional radiology.   Relocating to the UK If you are an international Radiologist who would like to relocate to the UK , email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you in securing an NHS post and on your relocation journey to the UK. Are you a member of our Facebook group? When you join IMG Advisor, you join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs to the group each day. We will also be on hand to answer all of your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 60 videos covering everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS. Listen to BDI Resourcing on the go with IMG Advisor the Podcast! You can listen to us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher and Buzzsprout. We have a number of episodes with tips and advice on relocating to the UK and the routes you can take to achieve this. Finally, we have just launched our new Instagram, so if you are a member, feel free to follow us to view our posts and IGTV: @bdiresourcing   References Cmescience.com. 2020. A Day In The Life Of A Radiologist. [online] Available at: <https://cmescience.com/a-day-in-the-life-of-a-radiologist/> [Accessed 14 May 2020]. Health Careers. 2020. Clinical Radiology. [online] Available at: <https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/explore-roles/doctors/roles-doctors/clinical-radiology> [Accessed 14 May 2020].

What to expect working in Acute Medicine in the NHS

By Alice Howe
June 03, 2020

This Blog article aims to provide insight into what working as an Acute Medicine Doctor in the UK is like.   What is Acute Medicine and How does it differ from General Medicine? According to the Society for Acute Medicine, “Acute Medicine tends to attract dynamic individuals who enjoy the wide variety of medicine that can be seen on take and the diagnostic challenges that it may pose. Working in a fast-paced environment, Acute Medics tend to be quite ‘hands-on’ and enjoy working as part of a team.” More specifically, Doctors in Acute medicine assess, investigate, diagnose and manage the care of patients with conditions that have developed quickly, exhibit severe symptoms and may be life-threatening. Due to the multidisciplinary environment, every day as an Acute Medicine Doctor will vary in its level of intensity. In many ways, Acute Medicine can be referred to as a sub-strand of Emergency Medicine or urgent care and it’s not something that there’s often a comparable unit to in other healthcare systems. In this way, it’s well worth considering that if you’re looking at a role in Acute Medicine, then you may want to be coming from a background where you’ve done a high frequency of on call, seeing lots of inpatients daily in a busy hospital.   Where will I be working? Most Acute Medicine Doctors will spend the majority of their working Day in the Acute Medical Unit (AMU) of the Trust however they will also see patients in the Emergency Department, Ambulatory Care Clinic (ACC) and other inpatient wards. The AMU is often a busy and bustling ward hosting a mixture of clinical pathologies and patients of all ages. Almost all medical patients are admitted to the hospital through the AMU and this is therefore seen as the hub for secondary medical care. Within the AMU the staffing team will consists of Junior Doctors, Middle Grades and Consultants alongside Nurses and medical secretaries. They will also be working closely with A&E and critical care staff, surgical teams, pharmacists, physiotherapists and social workers. As previously mentioned, Doctors in Acute Medicine may also spend a significant amount of time working in the Ambulatory Care Clinic (ACC), providing same day medical assessment care, with the traditional aspects of acute medical care but avoids hospital admission, strengthening and improving admission avoidance.     Relocating to the UK If you are an international Acute Medicine Doctor with MRCP or PLAB who would like to relocate to the UK, email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you in securing an NHS post and on your journey to relocate to the UK. Are you a member of our Facebook group? When you join IMG Advisor, you join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs to the group each day. We will also be on hand to answer all of your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 60 videos covering everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS. Listen to BDI Resourcing on the go with IMG Advisor the Podcast! You can listen to us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher and Buzzsprout. We have a number of episodes with tips and advice on relocating to the UK and the routes you can take to achieve this. Finally, we have just launched our new Instagram, so if you are a member, feel free to follow us to view our posts and IGTV: @bdiresourcing   References Rcpmedicalcare.org.uk. 2020. Ambulatory Emergency Care | Medical Care - Guidance For Desiging Services And Developing Physicians For Specialties. [online] Available at: <https://www.rcpmedicalcare.org.uk/designing-services/specialties/acute-internal-medicine/services-delivered/ambulatory-emergency-care/> [Accessed 2 June 2020]. Health Careers. 2020. Acute Internal Medicine. [online] Available at: <https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/explore-roles/doctors/roles-doctors/medicine/acute-internal-medicine> [Accessed 2 June 2020]. Health Careers. 2020. Working Life (AIM). [online] Available at: <https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/explore-roles/doctors/roles-doctors/medicine/acute-internal-medicine/working-life> [Accessed 2 June 2020].

What to expect working in Emergency Medicine in the NHS

By Alice Howe
May 13, 2020

Emergency Medicine, also referred to in the UK as A&E, ER and ED, is arguably the most in demand specialty within the NHS. Working as an Emergency Medicine Doctor in the NHS gives you the opportunity to secure jobs offering competitive salary, excellent career progression and access to specialty training.   What should I know? Emergency physicians will be expected to liaise with other specialties, coordinating the initial phase of a patients journey through the hospitals A&E department. They also interact with many people during the shift, including patients, nurses, relatives, junior doctors, consultant colleagues, ambulance crews and even the police. One very important thing to note, is that Doctors working in Emergency Medicine should expect to do an appreciable amount of night time and weekend work as ED’s are open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, making this a very demanding and rewarding specialty.   Where will I be based? On a general basis, if you are a Doctor working in Emergency Medicine you will predominantly be in the specific hospitals A&E department, however some posts will be carried out in trauma centres, walk-in centres and in-patient hospitals.   What is the difference between Emergency Departments and Trauma Centres? The Emergency Department is where patients go when they need emergency assistance, whether it be a sprained ankle, a heart attack or a stroke. In this way, the ED is a varied unit that has the facilities, doctors and expertise to handle almost any ‘emergency’ medical situation. Trauma Centres are normally located within the ED, however some major units will be separate from the hospital. Here they handle the most extreme Emergency cases or life-threatening injuries. Here you’ll find highly trained physicians who specialise in treating traumatic injuries, who will include: Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgeons Neurosurgeons Cardiac Surgeons Radiologists Nurses   As a method of comparison, the following table aims to highlight the difference in medical cases in both Trauma and ED units:   Emergency Department Trauma Centre Broken Bones Fainting or loss of consciousness Heart attacks Burns Strokes Severe vomiting/diarrhoea Severe pains Gunshot and stab wounds Major burns Serious Road Traffic Accidents Blunt trauma Brain or Head Injuries Amputations Relocating to the UK If you are an international Emergency Medicine doctor who would like to relocate to the UK , email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you in securing an NHS post and on your relocation journey to the UK. Are you a member of our Facebook group? When you join IMG Advisor, you join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs to the group each day. We will also be on hand to answer all of your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 60 videos covering everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS. Listen to BDI Resourcing on the go with IMG Advisor the Podcast! You can listen to us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher and Buzzsprout. We have a number of episodes with tips and advice on relocating to the UK and the routes you can take to achieve this. Finally, we have just launched our new Instagram, so if you are a member, feel free to follow us to view our posts and IGTV: @bdiresourcing   References Unitypoint.org. 2020. ER Vs. Trauma Center: What's The Difference? (Infographic). [online] Available at: <https://www.unitypoint.org/livewell/article.aspx?id=cafe17aa-df46-410c-9b6d-7855bf760f83> [Accessed 12 May 2020]. UPMC HealthBeat. 2020. What Is A Trauma Center? | Trauma System Levels | ER Or Trauma?. [online] Available at: <https://share.upmc.com/2016/05/what-is-a-trauma-center/> [Accessed 12 May 2020]. London Ambulance Service NHS Trust. 2020. Emergency Trauma Care - London Ambulance Service NHS Trust. [online] Available at: <https://www.londonambulance.nhs.uk/calling-us/emergency-trauma-care/> [Accessed 12 May 2020].

What to expect working as a Paediatrician in the NHS

By Alice Howe
May 06, 2020

This blog article aims to provide insight into what working as a Paediatrician in the UK is like and more specifically aims to explain the different levels of Paediatrics and Neonatology.   What roles are there within Paediatrics? As a Paediatrician, your job is to diagnose and treat health conditions that affect babies, children and young people. Paediatrics can be divided into 4 main areas: General Paediatrics – hospital role covering children up to the age of 16. All paediatricians will start their training in General Paediatrics and then some will choose to apply for a Paediatric subspecialty (also known as ‘Grid’). Neonatology – this role specialises in looking after newly born babies. This is usually based within an Intensive care unit and Doctors specifically look after premature babies or those with problems at birth Community Paediatrics – these doctors are based within the community and look after children with developmental, social and behavioural problems as well as those with a physical disability Paediatric Cardiology – This is a smaller area of Paediatrics whereby Doctors diagnose and treat children with heart conditions. Whilst each of these 4 areas are profoundly different in their focus, your day-to-day duties as a Paediatrician working in any one of these, may include: assessing children who are ill, injured or have disabilities referring patients to specialist consultants for tests prescribing medication, surgery or therapies explaining diagnosis and treatment plans to parents and children writing patient notes and producing medical reports for professionals monitoring patient progress and responses to treatments supervising and training junior medical staff It is important to note that these four areas of Paediatrics can be further broken down into multiple sub-specialties (‘Grid’). At level 3 of training (ST6-8), paediatric trainees are eligible to sub-specialise and on completion of an approved programme, enter onto the GMC Specialist Register as a Paediatrician with sub-specialty. This process is called NTN Grid Recruitment. Paediatric sub-specialties include, but are not limited to: Nephrology Neurodisability Neurology Oncology Intensive care Respiratory Mental Health Emergency Rheumatology Inherited Metabolic Diabetes and Endocrinology Gastroenterology, hepatology and nutrition   Levels of Care There are different levels or Tiers within Paediatrics, specifically Neonatology, and these are named depending on the level of specialist care they offer and provide. As a simple breakdown, the Levels of care are as follows: Level 1) Low level dependency Level 2) Increased level of support and care for children who may need short-term intensive care Level 3) Highest level of Support within Dependency Wards, Tertiary Centres and Intensive Care Units More specifically, within Neonatology, the levels can be broken down further. Some Job Adverts may be listed as ‘Paediatrics with Level 1 Neonatology’ or Level 2 or 3. These levels correspond to the specific procedures and care provided within the department.   Level 1: Special Care Baby Unit (SCBU, sometimes called Low Dependency) This is for babies who do not need intensive care and are often born after 32 week’s gestation. The role of a Doctor within this ward may include, but is not limited to: Monitor babies breathing or heart rate Give the baby more oxygen Treat low body temperature Treat low blog sugar Helping baby feed, sometimes by using a tube Helping babies who become unwell shortly after birth Treatment of jaundice (sometimes treated in post-natal or transitional care units)   Level 2: Local Neonatal Unit (LNU) This is for babies who need a higher level of medical and nursing support. If a baby has been or is due to be born between 28 and 32 weeks gestation, it may be transferred to an LNU. The role of a Doctor within this ward may include, but is not limited to: Provide Breathing support given through their windpipe Short-term intensive care Care during short periods where baby stops breathing (apnoea) Continuous positive airway pressure or high flow therapy for breathing support Feeding through a drip in baby’s vein (parenteral nutrition) Provide cooling treatment for babies who have had difficult births or are unwell soon after birth Helping babies who become unwell shortly after birth   Level 3: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) This is for babies who need the highest level of medical and nursing support. Often these babies will have been born before 28 week’s gestation, or be very unwell after birth. Babies are cared for here when they: Need breathing support Have a severe respiratory disease Need or have just had surgery   Relocating to the UK If you are an international Paediatric doctor who would like to relocate to the UK , email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you in securing an NHS post and on your journey to relocate to the UK. Are you a member of our Facebook group? When you join IMG Advisor, you join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs to the group each day. We will also be on hand to answer all of your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 60 videos covering everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS. Listen to BDI Resourcing on the go with IMG Advisor the Podcast! You can listen to us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher and Buzzsprout. We have a number of episodes with tips and advice on relocating to the UK and the routes you can take to achieve this. Finally, we have just launched our new Instagram, so if you are a member, feel free to follow us to view our posts and IGTV: @bdiresourcing   References RCPCH. 2020. Sub-Specialty Training (NTN Grid) - Application Guidance. [online] Available at: [Accessed 5 May 2020]. RCPCH. 2020. Choose Paediatrics. [online] Available at: [Accessed 5 May 2020]. Health Careers. 2020. Paediatrics. [online] Available at: [Accessed 5 May 2020]. Bliss. 2020. What Are The Different Levels Of Neonatal Care? | Bliss. [online] Available at: [Accessed 5 May 2020].

Shortage Occupation List

By Alice Howe
February 19, 2020

The shortage occupation list is an official list of occupations for which there are not enough resident workers to fill vacancies. Several times a year, the government and the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) regularly release an up-to-date list of all the industries and occupations that urgently require more staff or vacancies.   How does this effect IMGs? In May 2019, the MAC recommended that ‘Medical Practitioners’ be added to the UK Shortage Occupation List and in October 2019 this was confirmed.  The British Medical Association has stated: 'It's very clear that overseas doctors have always made a valuable contribution to the success of our health service; their contribution is needed now more than ever’. In light of this, international recruitment of doctors has increased. Not only this, but overseas doctors no longer have to meet extortionate visa fees and financial thresholds to work within the NHS. Does this effect Tier 2 Visas? The standard UK work visa is the Tier 2 visa, which has a points-based application system. In total you must secure 70 points to qualify for the Tier 2 Visa, 30 of which rely on your Certificate of Sponsorship (COS) from your UK employer and whether your salary will meet the UK requirements. However, due to the Shortage Occupation List, IMG’s that come to the UK to fill a position now gain enough points without having to prove their potential earnings. Additionally, the cost of a Tier 2 Work Visa on the Shortage Occupation List is almost 25% less than occupations that don’t appear on it. What’s more, if you want to obtain permanent UK residency after your Tier 2 visa has expired, you will be exempt from the minimum income threshold and salary requirement of £35,000. Will the Shortage Occupation List Change? The Shortage Occupation List is regularly reviewed by both government and the MAC. However, it is important to note that removal of an occupation from the list does not mean that a Tier 2 application will not be granted for any vacancy that exists. BDI If you’re a doctor who would like support relocating to the UK and finding a job in the NHS, email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you on your relocation journey. Are you a member of our Facebook group? When you join IMG Advisor, you will join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs to the group every day. We will also be on hand to answer any relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 60 videos on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS. Listen to BDI Resourcing on the go with IMG Advisor the Podcast. You can find us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher and Buzzsprout. We have a number of episodes with tips and advice on obtaining GMC registration and securing an NHS job. References Bma.org.uk. (2020). BMA - Government widens job shortage list. [online] Available at: https://www.bma.org.uk/news/2019/may/government-widens-job-shortage-list [Accessed 31 Jan. 2020]. S. (2020). Shortage occupation list. [online] Nhsemployers.org. Available at: https://www.nhsemployers.org/your-workforce/recruit/employer-led-recruitment/international-recruitment/shortage-occupation-list [Accessed 31 Jan. 2020]. AWH Solicitors. (2020). Coming to Work in the UK with Skills on the UK Shortage Occupation List. [online] Available at: https://awhsolicitors.co.uk/articles/immigration/shortage-occupation-list/ [Accessed 31 Jan. 2020].

NHS Service Post v NHS Training Post

By Gabrielle Richardson
December 13, 2019

The UK’s National Health Service (NHS) is one of the largest employers in the world and it is the biggest employer in Europe, with over 1.3 million staff. A typical day for the NHS includes: Over 835,000 people visiting their GP practice or practice nurse Almost 50,000 people visiting accident and emergency departments 49,000 outpatient consultations 94,000 people admitted to hospital as an emergency admission 36,000 people in hospital for planned treatment No matter what area of the NHS you join, you will become part of a talented, passionate team of individuals who are committed to providing extraordinary care and treatment to UK patients. With the NHS being such a busy institution and with over 10,000 vacancies at this present time – it is important for the NHS to possesses both Service Doctors and Training Doctors but we often get asked what the difference is… An NHS Service Post An NHS service post (also known as a non-training post) is designed to fill gaps in the department’s rota of training doctors. So, in order to ensure that NHS patients receive continuity of care and excellent quality of care, service posts exist. The job role of a service doctor is essentially the same as a doctor in training, except the post is not recognised by an NHS Deanery and it is not designed to provide official educational support. That being said, some hospitals do provide international doctors with CESR support to help them get onto the Specialist Register (get in contact with us today to find out which hospitals – [email protected]). What is an NHS Deanery? An NHS Deanery is a regional organisation who is responsible for postgraduate medical training, within the NHS. Each NHS Deanery is advised by a Specialty Training Committee (STC), which includes a number of Consultants who provide their expert opinion. The recruitment of doctors into Specialty Training Programmes are managed by Deaneries. Once you have accepted a training post the Deanery will then allocate specific jobs, arrange educational supervision and provide the assessment of whether you have demonstrated sufficient progress within your training. What is an NHS Training Post? If you have secured an NHS training post, your relevant Deanery will provide you with a set curriculum that you will need to follow with regards to updating your e-portfolio, signing off competencies and attending teaching sessions. You will be allocated an Educational and Clinical Supervisor to provide you with support. Within a training post, you will be allocated study leave to allow you to study for your postgraduate qualification exams. As an international doctor – can I apply for a Specialty Training Post? It is important to note that NHS training posts are extremely competitive. So, to successfully obtain an NHS training post we always advise the following: Obtain a service post for a year or two years, acclimatise yourself with the system and then you will be both physically and mentally prepared and eligible to apply for a training post. Good luck! Securing an NHS Service Post If you are an international doctor who has plans to relocate to the UK and join the NHS – email your CV to [email protected] and we will be happy to support you through the entire process. From your GMC Registration, assistance securing a post, relocation logistics to finding schools for your children. Are you a member of IMG Advisor? Here, you will find access to frequent relocation blog posts, the opportunity to receive professional guidance on relocating to the UK and the chance to meet other IMGs! References Jobs.nhs.uk. (2019). NHS Jobs - Working in the NHS. [online] Available at: https://www.jobs.nhs.uk/about_nhs.html [Accessed 24 Apr. 2019]. BMJ.com (2004). The BMJ – What is the difference between a LAT post and a LAS post? [online] Available at: https://www.bmj.com/content/329/7479/s236.1 [Accessed 24 Apr.2019].

The top 5 reasons to work within the NHS

By Gabrielle Richardson
November 05, 2019

The UK’s National Health Service (NHS) is one of the largest employers in the world and the biggest in Europe, employing over 1.3 million staff. For the NHS, a typical day includes: Over 835,000 visits to GP Practice’s Almost 50,000 people Accident and Emergency Departments Over 49,000 outpatient consultations 94,000 people are admitted to hospital as an emergency 36,000 people in hospital for planned treatment The NHS offers a huge range of exciting and challenging opportunities for doctors who are passionate about making a difference. So, we wanted to share the top reasons on why it is amazing to work within the NHS. 1. You will make a difference to someone’s life every single day Whether you are a Pediatrician treating children or a Surgeon carrying out life-saving operations, you are part of an amazing team that makes a huge difference to peoples’ lives every single day. 2. World renowned training The NHS provides world-class training and support to their doctors to help them develop unique skills. You will learn things that you did not know you needed. The best thing about practicing medicine in the UK is that there is always more to learn, from new equipment to new procedures. 3. The opportunity for professional development The NHS allows you to develop both professionally and personally. You will deal with high pressure situations that will enhance your medical knowledge and skills whilst overlapping into your personal life to make you into a better person. 4. Access to fantastic discounts Working within the NHS allows you to save money on everything! From travel, shopping, insurance to finance. You can also save money and earn cashback at over 50 stores with the NHS Cashback Card. The list of companies you can receive discount from are, but are not limited to: Ray-Ban, Asics, Apple, Moss Bros, Paperchase, Sofology, Halfords, New Balance, Clarks, GHD, Hotpoint, Benefit, Flipflop, PureGym, Gymshark, Graze Snack Boxes, Leon, Nandos, Gourmet Burger Kitchen, Case Nero, TGI Friday’s, Ask Italian, Yo! Sushi, Zizzi, Thorpe Park, Jet2holidays, Travelodge, Virgin Holidays, The London Dungeons, Shrek’s Adventure London, BuyaGift Experience Days, Go Ape Adventure, Murder 57 Murder Mystery Breaks, Quad Nation Quad Biking. Sign up for free today to start saving with Health Service Discounts. 5. An excellent Pension Scheme Having one of the best pension schemes in the entire UK will help you secure a better future. When you retire, you will be entitled to a tax-free lump sum that can support you through the later years of your life. Click here to find out more information on the NHS Pension Scheme. Dr Naseer Khan’s Reasons for Living in the UK: 1. “A sense of satisfaction: the NHS is beautiful system that does not discriminate on the basis of your financial status. Healthcare in the UK does not only include treatment at the hospital, but it includes a completely physical and mental wellbeing at both home and work as well. It gives me immense satisfaction that I am part of this system. 2. Learning: The UK is open to all and because the UK has always been a centre of excellence in medicine, it is one of the best places in the world to learn and grow as a doctor. 3. The Working Hours: We only work an average of 40-48 hours per week. So, we get enough time for ourselves. 4. Money: Even as junior doctors, we earn enough to able to afford the latest cars and to buy a house in the UK. As a junior doctor, my earning in Pakistan was only 10% of my earning in the UK.” Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor who has decided that the UK is for you, email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you in securing an NHS post and on your journey to the UK today. Are you a member of our Facebook Group? When you join IMG Advisor, you will join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs into the group every single day. We will also always be on hand to answer all your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 35 videos on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS! References Fullard, A. (2019). 5 Reasons Why It’s Awesome to Work in the NHS - Health Service Discounts. [online] Health Service Discounts. Available at: http://blog.healthservicediscounts.com/5-reasons-why-its-awesome-to-work-in-the-nhs/ [Accessed 9 Oct. 2019].

How to get CCT and onto the Specialist Register

By Gabrielle Richardson
October 22, 2019

To work as a permanent Consultant in the UK, you will need to evidence your specialist knowledge, skills and experience via one of three pathways to get onto the Specialist Register. This blog post explains the difference in the three pathways and how you can obtain a Certificate Completion of Training (CCT). What is the Specialist Register? The Specialist Register was introduced on 1st January 1997. It is a public list of doctors who are eligible to take up appointment in any fixed term, honorary or substantive Consultant posts within the NHS. Once you are on the Specialist Register, the public can view the following information: The specialty and sub-specialties you are qualified in The date you joined the specialist register in each specialty Click here to access the Specialist Register. How do I get onto the Specialist Register? You have three pathways available to you. 1. CCT To apply for CCT, you must have obtained all of your specialty training via a GMC approved UK training post. Further information on what a GMC approved training is can be found below. 2. CESR CP To apply for CESR CP award, you would have had a combination of your training done via a GMC approved postgraduate qualification and non-approved training post. For example, you would use this route if you are an international doctor who trained overseas and then joined the NHS at ST5 level because you were able to demonstrate your competencies gained outside of a GMC approved training post. 3. CESR If you are a doctor who has obtained all of your specialist training overseas or within a non-approved GMC training post and your experience and qualifications are relevant to the entirety of the curriculum, you can use CESR as a pathway of getting onto the Specialist Register. Click here to read our full guide on CESR. What is a GMC approved training programme? The GMC approve the curriculum and assessments for 65 different medical specialties and 31 sub-specialties. Each GMC approved curriculum is designed by the Royal College and their faculties. Click here for a list of approved curriculum documents and training pathways. Click here for a list of sub-specialty approved curricula. How do I apply for CCT? When applying, you must make sure that all of the below evidence is uploaded to your Royal College’s e-Portfolio’s Additional Evidence tab. Documents required: Your CCT application form (this must be reviewed and signed by the Postgraduate Dean) Logbook Cumulative Data Sheet (this must be signed by the Training Programme Director) Your Educational Supervisor Reports It is important to contact your NHS Educational Supervisor with regards to your CCT application as they will provide you with a full list of documents to collate and the appropriate steps to take. Method of Submission Once you have collated your documentation, you will need to email your submission to the Head of Education and Training of your Royal College.   After this, you will then receive an email from the GMC asking for you to submit your application to them. Your evidence will sit with the GMC until they receive your Royal College’s recommendation which will trigger the issuing of your CCT certificate. It is advised for you to apply to the GMC before your CCT date to avoid delays. Please note, applications for CCT must be made to the GMC within 12 months of a doctor’s expected completion of training date. After 12 months from the expected completion of training date, you will have to apply for CESR to get onto the Specialist Register. Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor who has decided that the UK is for you, email your CV to [email protected] and we can support you in securing an NHS post and on your journey to the UK today. Are you a member of our Facebook Group? When you join IMG Advisor, you will join a community of doctors all looking to relocate to the UK and join the NHS. We post a series of blogs and vlogs into the group every single day. We will also always be on hand to answer all your relocation queries. Subscribe to our YouTube channel! We have over 40 videos on everything you need to know about relocating to the UK and joining the NHS! References Gmc-uk.org. (2019). GMC approved postgraduate curricula. [online] Available at: https://www.gmc-uk.org/education/standards-guidance-and-curricula/curricula [Accessed 22 Oct. 2019]. The Royal College of Ophthalmologists. (2019). Award of the Certificate of Completion of Training (CCT) - The Royal College of Ophthalmologists. [online] Available at: https://www.rcophth.ac.uk/training/certification-of-training-and-specialist-training/award-of-the-cct/ [Accessed 22 Oct. 2019].

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