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WAST: Widening Access to Specialty Training for IMGs

By Gabrielle Richardson
February 06, 2019

The NHS has launched a new initiative to allow international doctors to work and train in England, prior to obtaining NHS experience (as is required to apply for a training post). The new initiative will allow you to experience a programme which will ensure you develop the skills and competencies needed to apply a training programme after you have completed it. During the initiative, you will work six months in a Psychiatry post, six months in an Acute hospital setting and a two-week taster session within a General Practice Surgery. The NHS states that this post is perfect for doctors who want to pursue a career in General Practice (internationally known as family medicine) or Psychiatry. Bonus! A financial relocation package will be provided. How do I apply for WAST? First, you will need to update your CV and then make an online application here. If you are successful, you will then be invited to attend an interview and assessment centre located in the UK. It is likely that your interview will be held in Manchester.   Interviews are expected to be held in March 2019, August 2019 and March 2020 and then posts likely to start in February or August the next year. Please note, you will still need via the PLAB route to start a WAST post. What is the advantage of WAST? This is a fantastic opportunity for international doctors looking to pursue a long-term career within the UK and receive training. By completing WAST, you will have access to: Top quality training and development Good standard of pay Work experience within one of the world’s largest healthcare systems Am I eligible to apply for WAST? To apply, you must have the following: A GMC recognised primary medical qualification Eligible for full GMC registration Eligible to legally work in the UK Have additional qualifications such as ILS, ALS, Have recently completed your internship and have six-twelve months postgraduate experience For further information on how to access UK Specialty Training within the NHS, read our blog post here. Please click here to gain access to the WAST Application Form. Please click here to gain access to the Additional Employment History Form Please click here to gain access to the Fitness to the Practise Declaration Are you a member of our Facebook Group IMG Advisor? Here, you will have access to relocation blog posts and updates, the opportunity to receive professional support and the chance to meet other IMGs.  References training. (2019).  Training > Recruitment > Widening Access to Specialty Training > About the programme. ] Available at: https://specialtytraining.hee.nhs.uk/Recruitment/Widening-Access-to-Specialty-Training/About-the-programme [Accessed 5 Feb. 2019]. . (2019). Apply. ] Available at: https://specialtytraining.hee.nhs.uk/Recruitment/Widening-Access-to-Specialty-Training/Apply [Accessed 5 Feb. 2019].    

How to get a CoS for your Tier 2 Visa

By Gabrielle Richardson
January 29, 2019

Once a hospital has agreed to employ a non-EEA doctor, they will need to allocate a Certificate of Sponsorship (CoS) to that doctor in order for them to make their Tier 2 Visa application. What is a CoS? A CoS is not a physical document, but a reference number which an international doctor can use to apply to enter or remain in the UK. There are two types of CoS: Unrestricted and restricted. Unrestricted – The CoS will be automatically allocated to the doctor Restricted – The application has to go to panel on the 11 month and there will be a wait for approval Unrestricted CoS When the Tier 2 visa cap was lifted in June 2018 – it meant that all doctors and nurses would be automatically allocated a CoS regardless of their point score (based on salaryprovided the application goes through as unrestricted. How the hospital applies for an unrestricted CoS A job offer is made to the doctor and pre-employment checks are carried out The hospital will apply online to the UK Home Office Visa and Immigration Office (UKVI) for an allocation, taken out of the yearly amount The CoS is granted and added to the sponsorship management system assigned by the hospital to the doctor The doctor applies for a Tier 2 visa within three months of receiving CoS The doctor’s Tier 2 visa application is successful and entry clearance granted Please note, there is no need to apply for an unrestricted CoS before a deadline as there is no panel – typically, you will receive the approved CoS within 48 hours. Restricted CoS Despite the Tier 2 visa cap in June, the hospital a certain number of unrestricted CoS’ per year – meaning, they may have to use a restricted CoS to apply for a doctor’s sponsorship licence if they do not have any unrestricted applications left. How the hospital applies for a restricted CoS The Resident Labour Market test is met, a doctor interviews a post, a job offer is made, and the pre-employment checks are completed The hospital will then apply online to the UKVI Office for a certificate from the limited monthly allocation Applications are assessed on the 11 each month when a panel meeting takes place. A hospital must submit their CoS application for a doctor the 5 each month to be considered on time When the CoS is granted, the hospital will assign it to the doctor and they will have three months to use the COS The doctor applies for a Tier 2 visa The doctor’s Tier 2 visa application is successful and entry clearance granted If you apply for a restricted CoS, the turnaround time could be around a month as you will need to wait for the panel to meet and approve the application. Our Advice Where possible, we advise for NHS hospitals to apply for an unrestricted CoS for their doctor. This means that the CoS could be returned in a matter of days. Whereas, if the CoS is applied for as unrestricted, it can take a number of weeks to be returned thus delaying the doctor’s ability to apply for their Tier 2 visa and starting employment within the Trust. If you are a doctor waiting for your CoS – do not worry about whether your job is on the shortage occupation list or whether your salary is high enough. The Tier 2 visa cap lift means that ALL doctors CoS’ will be approved, regardless of those issues. To speed up the ability to apply for your CoS – have all of your documents in order. This includes: -Passport -Proof of address x 2 -References to cover the last three years of employment x 2 -Police Clearance Certificate -Certificate of Good Standing Any questions? Email [email protected] and we will be happy to help. Are you a member of our Facebook Group? IMG Advisor Here, you will have access to frequent relocation blog posts, the opportunity to ask questions and receive professional advice and the chance to meet other IMGs!      

Skype Interviews with the NHS

By Gabrielle Richardson
January 16, 2019

After your CV has been reviewed by an NHS Trust and they have made the decision to invite you to an interview – it is likely the invitation will be via Skype, unless you are currently based within the UK. In today’s post, we share the ways you can successfully nail your NHS Skype interview and secure your first NHS post. How do I set up Skype? Step 1: Download Skype to your computer or mobile Step 2: Create a free account by entering your personal details Step 3: Sign in to your account It is that simple! How to prepare for Step 1: Add the hospitals Skype ID the day before the Skype call Step 2: A few hours before your scheduled Skype call, send a message to the NHS hospital informing them of your name, what post you are interviewing for and your interview time slot Step 3: An hour before your interview, try and do a “Skype test” with a friend or a Recruitment Consultant to test your connection and ensure there are no technical difficulties Step 4: Be available on Skype for at least 20 minutes prior to your interview slot – as the hospital sometimes calls earlier (or later) and so it is best to always be available online Step 5: Accept the Skype call when the hospital ring – and good luck! Tips for a successful Skype interview 1. Dress smartly Although you will not be interviewing physically, it is important that you look the part. If you are a male, we advise you to wear a smart shirt and perhaps a tie. And if you are a female, you could perhaps wear a blouse or a smart dress. 2. Prepare your surroundings You should prepare for your Skype call to be in a quiet, business-like setting, ideally in a room with a closed door. You should also try and not have a cluttered background behind you as this may distract the Consultant and HR Representative who is interviewing you – sending the wrong message about your organisational skills.   Try and have a plain, white background. And remember to tell anyone else at home about your Skype interview as you do not want it to be interrupted by someone calling your name or loud noises. 3. Remember to smile During your interview, you should try and keep a pleasant facial expression. It is more difficult to do this via technology, but it is important to try and stay upbeat when answering questions. You should also try and interject listening sounds throughout the interview, such as “yes” whilst your interviewers speak. This will reassure those interviewing you that the technology is working, and you are listening to what they are saying. 4. Use your interview preparation notes NHS interviews typically start with going through your CV and so it would be a good idea to have a printed copy in front of you – this will allow you to view the same information that they are reading. You could also make use of the space by creating some notes, including any questions you want to ask the Trust towards the end of the interview. Join the NHS If you have a Royal College Qualification or PLAB and IELTS/OET and you are ready to relocate to the UK, but need some help securing a Skype interview – email your CV to [email protected] and we will be happy to help you. Join our Facebook Group Come and join our Facebook Group IMG Advisor! Here, you will have access to frequent relocation blog posts, the opportunity to ask questions and receive professional support and the chance to meet other IMGs. References Themuse.com. (2019). 7 Ways to Nail Your Phone or Skype Interview. ] Available at: https://www.themuse.com/advice/7-ways-to-nail-your-phone-or-skype-interview [Accessed 16 Jan. 2019]. Log in to use Ginger Limited mode UK, but ×

Working with a Recruitment Consultant

By Gabrielle Richardson
December 04, 2018

When you apply for your first NHS post, you have two options: to apply directly via NHS Jobs or to use a medical recruitment agency, such as ourselves – BDI Resourcing. We sometimes see negative comments online about the recruitment industry and there seems to be a misalliance between doctors and nurses’ expectations of the recruitment industry in general, and the reality of the situation. Here at BDI Resourcing, we pride ourselves on being more than a medical recruitment agency but going to extra mile for all our doctors and nurses that we speak to, whether we find them their first NHS post or not. Therefore, in this article, we share the advantages of working with us. 1. Professional Representation A good Recruitment Consultant will not email your CV off to every single NHS hospital. Over the years, we have worked on building relationships with HR departments and Lead Consultants, who trust our opinion and expertise. Furthermore, most doctors and nurses will have specific preferences, such as the desire to work within a university hospital, live in a major city or have access to excellent quality schools – thus, it is important to find a Recruitment Consultant who will meet all these needs. Remember, a recommendation from a trustworthy Recruitment Consultant will put your CV right in front of the relevant Clinical Director, while an application via NHS jobs may disappear amongst the thousands of applications. 2. Specialist Representation Most medical recruitment agencies are generalised, and you will deal with a number of different Consultants throughout the entire process. However, at BDI Resourcing you will have one sole point of contact, who will be dedicated to helping doctors within one particular specialty. This is advantageous because it means they are able to communicate with the right contacts, such as the Paediatric Lead Consultant for international doctors looking to take up a Neonatal post. 3. End to end service When we partner with a doctor or nurse, we support them through every single step of the way. Our service starts with CV advice, to sourcing interviews whilst meeting all your preferences. Once you have accepted your first NHS post, you will then be introduced to our Relocation and Compliance Officer, who will guide you through the CoS, visa and relocation process. Our officer will help you with booking flights, finding UK accommodation and airport transfers. BDI Resourcing appreciates that NHS HR departments are extremely busy and they may not always be on hand to answer your questions – and this is where we will come in! No matter how small the question, we will be happy to guide and support you whenever you need it. 4. Access to jobs not advertised on NHS Jobs BDI Resourcing are in the business of knowing. Each of our Consultants are always networking and we are aware of NHS posts that are not always advertised on NHS Jobs, such as those currently filled by Locums… increasing your chances of being selected for an interview. 5. Time-Saving When you are applying for a new job, it is vital that you tailor your CV and cover letters to increase your chance of selection – especially if you are a junior doctor and decide to apply for different specialties. However, if you partner with BDI Resourcing, you will only have to create one CV. We have found hundreds of doctors their first NHS post and so we have a thorough understanding of the NHS’ preferred formatted CV and all the information that should be included. We will always provide you with CV suggestions to enhance your application. 6. Interview Support When we have organised your first interview, we will provide you with in-depth knowledge about the vacant post, a job description of the role, information about the hospital and its area, information on who will be interviewing you and what they are looking for. We will also go through some interview questions with you to help you prepare for it. 7. Salary Negotiation You have worked hard to get all the required GMC Registration qualifications, impressed the interviewer and the hospital has decided to offer you the post. However, the salary offered is much lower than you anticipated, but you really want to accept the job. BDI Resourcing have in-depth knowledge of the NHS pay scale and we are extremely experienced in negotiating a higher salary – so leave it with us, and we will work our magic until you are happy. 8. Our Services are free When a doctor or nurse partners with us, our services are completely free for them to use. 9. You will gain a friend Throughout the whole process, you will have a friend. We thoroughly understand that the process of relocating is an overwhelming one, and so we want to provide you with as much support as you would like. From the moment you first speak with our Consultant, to when you arrive in the UK, we would love to meet you and continue to speak after you have started your new post. Anything you need... we will be just a telephone call away! If you are an international doctor or nurse and you would like to relocate to the UK and work within the NHS – send your CV to [email protected] and we will be in touch. Join our Facebook Group IMG Advisor! Here, you will have access to frequent relocation blog posts, the opportunity to ask questions and receive professional guidance and the chance to meet other IMGs!

How to find the NHS job you love

By Gabrielle Richardson
November 28, 2018

After you have obtained GMC Registration, finding a new job can be a challenging and frustrating experience. However, with our fundamental tips, you can make the job search a bit easier on yourself if you use a proactive strategy and find the job you love. 1. Be clear on what you want If you are a junior doctor, it is important for you to take the time to reflect on your strengths and weaknesses and the type of work you enjoy doing. The better you know yourself, the more likely you will find yourself working within a specialty that provides you with greater job satisfaction. Before making NHS applications, ask yourself: What do I want from the job? Experience within a particular specialty, the opportunity to train, location, title, salary etc? 2. Tailor your resume to each job Did you know that recruiters/medical staffing/lead clinicians will spend no more than 5-10 seconds looking at your CV? Therefore, it is vital that you make yourself an obvious fit for the post you are applying to. Our first piece of advice is to study the job description and use the same words, phrases and responsibilities listed within your CV. It is important for you to tailor your CV to each job application. For example, if you are a junior doctor, it is no use providing your duties and responsibilities within your Surgery rotation when applying for an Emergency Medicine post and leaving your experience within that rotation blank. 3. Organise your job applications When you start your job search, organise your applications within a visual system. You could create a spreadsheet that allows you to track your applications based on hospital, salary, interview invitations, rejections etc. This will allow you to keep perspective within the process. 4. Utilise your network of contacts This can include online and offline contacts. Searching online will allow you to find out what jobs and opportunities are out there and are available, so you can be more strategic in your job search. You may find someone who already works within the NHS and they can help you source a clinical attachment or you could use social media to uncover job leads. Don’t be afraid to message other doctors or recruiters on Facebook and LinkedIn for advice and guidance. 5. Patience is a virtue The NHS job hunt can be tough, stressful and can often leave you feeling disheartened. So, when you begin to feel saddened, take some time out to exercise, meet some friends or any activity that helps you unwind. Prepare for the job hunt to take longer than you think. Some doctors find their first NHS jobs in a matter of weeks, but for others, it can take months. It is important not to rush the process and wait for the right opportunity. 6. Treat the interviews as a conversation Remember it is just as valuable for you to ask the NHS interview panel questions, just as it is for them to ask you questions. This will allow you to find out if this is the right opportunity for you and if there are future opportunities for training, teaching, research etc. If you are an international doctor who is searching for your first NHS post, email your CV to [email protected] and one of our Specialist Advisers will be in touch. Join our Facebook Group IMG Advisor! Here, you will have access to frequent relocation blog posts, the opportunity to ask questions and receive professional support and the chance to meet other IMGs. References Anon, (2018). [online] Available at: https://www.twinemployment.com/blog/8-surprising-statistics-about-cv-s-that-you-need-to-know [Accessed 28 Nov. 2018]. LiveCareer. (2018). 14 Quick Tips for Finding a New Job | LiveCareer. [online] Available at: https://www.livecareer.com/career/advice/jobs/14-job-hunting-tips [Accessed 28 Nov. 2018].

How to make an impact during your NHS interview

By Gabrielle Richardson
November 26, 2018

You have worked extremely hard to obtain a Royal College Qualification or pass the PLAB exams and then go on to pass IELTS or OET. You have moved on to the next stage of the process, started applying for NHS jobs and you have been invited to your first interview! Preparing for your interview in the right way will enhance your application, set you apart from other candidates and hopefully secure you the position. An NHS interview is not only an opportunity to talk through your qualifications and experience but for the Consultant to decide if he wants to work with you. In today’s post, we provide you with six tips on how to leave a lasting impression on the interview panel during your NHS interview. 1. Your personal qualities When preparing for your interview you should ask yourself ‘What qualities do I want to demonstrate?’ It is vital for doctors to demonstrate certain qualities such as compassion and professionalism – but do you have any qualities that will set you apart from others? Such as leadership skills, adaptability, confidence, trustworthiness – where appropriate try and provide example scenarios to demonstrate these skills. 2. Practice your answers NHS interviews tend to follow a particular format and questions are often repeated.   Visit our NHS Interview Guide blog post where you will receive a list of standard NHS questions. Try and prepare an answer for each question and a real-life scenario of how you can evidence this, this will save you thinking time during the interview itself. You should also prepare a response for a question you may not know the answer to straight away, you could say “Please may we come back to that question, I would like a little more time to gather my thoughts”. 3. Turn the interview into a conversation Although the purpose of the interview is for the hospital to find out more information about your skills and experience, it is also an opportunity for you to inquire about the position available. You should attend the interview with some insightful questions prepared, such as opportunities for training, teaching, further information on your duties and responsibilities or if there will be a chance to get some experience in an area of interest. You should also read up on the hospital’s website, their CQC rating, their location in the UK – as you may get asked why you want to take up a post in that specific hospital. 4. Remember short and succinct answers are the best answers As a result of feeling nervous, some people overcompensate by talking too much.  However, it is important to tell yourself that sometimes questions only need a short response and so it is important for you to learn the ability to be concise. Before you answer each question, you should summarise in your head what the interviewer has asked before you answer. And then if your answer requires depth you should signpost your response by saying “firstly, secondly etc”. This will help your answer remain structured and for your most important points to be conveyed. If you vary the length of your answers it will also help the interview appear more of a natural conversation. 5. Ask for feedback When the interview is coming to a close, it would be useful for you to ask if you could receive some feedback on your performance (if this has not already been offered). Try and do this in a professional way without looking too pushy. 6. Continuously emphasise patient safety The most important thing an NHS Employer wants to know from an international doctor is that they will be able to “practice safely”, so when answering their questions it is fundamental to speak of patient safety being paramount and provide solid answers to clinical scenario questions. Email your CV to [email protected] and one of our Specialist Advisers will be in touch. Join our Facebook Group IMG Advisor! Here, you will have access to frequent relocation blog posts, the opportunity to receive professional support and the chance to meet other IMGs!

NHS Interview Questions with Answers

By Gabrielle Richardson
August 13, 2018

We are frequently asked what questions you will be asked during your NHS interviews, and often, for most, they do not know the right answer. When interviewing, there is never a “right” answer, but remember to be honest, remain calm, confident and interested in the position. In this article, we provide you with frequently asked questions in an NHS interview – and example answers that will impress your prospective employer. Typically, the NHS prefers to interview IMG candidates via Skype as often they are located across the world and cannot get to the UK easily. Remember to prepare for your interview in the following ways: Understand and know the job/person specification 2. Carry out research on the recruiting hospital and the interviewing department and knowledge of the interviews academic/professional background 3. Practice frequently asked interview questions 4. Prepare questions to ask the interviewing panel First Impression Tips: Dress Professionally Be Punctual to your interview slot Have a positive attitude Frequently Asked NHS Interview Questions Tell me about yourself This question will be asked at the beginning of the interview and is queried because the hospital want to hear about your employment history, training, education, your dreams (let them know they are in line with the position you are interviewing for) and any ties to the hospital or location you are applying to. Tip: Try and convey your message in a few brief sentences. Where do you see yourself in five years? This can often feel like a trick question, but it is important to be honest, while still providing the answers your interviewers want to know. Questions you should ask yourself before answering this question are: -Do you have realistic expectations for your career? -Are you ambitious? -Does the position you are interviewing for align with your growth and goals overall Our tip when answering this question is: Think about where this job role could realistically take you and then think about how that aligns with your professional goals. Example Answer: “I am really excited about this Clinical Fellow Paediatrics position because, in five years, I want to acclimatise to the NHS system and work in a supportive department that will enable me to, in the future, either complete my specialist registration via CESR or apply for a deanery training post. My long-term plan is to stay in the UK and hopefully become a consultant.” If there was a misunderstanding between two colleagues what should you do? In group settings, at some point, you will encounter conflict. As an individual who works with the general public, it is important that you mediate conflict quickly and efficiently. Example Answer: If I noticed a hostile environment between two colleagues, I would suggest for them to both meet privately with me. I would ask them to summarise the situation from their own viewpoint and I would reinforce that this can only be resolved through discussion and negotiation. Why do you want to work in the UK? The NHS is one of the largest healthcare systems in the world and the largest employer in the UK and Europe. Therefore, for many doctors across the globe working in the NHS will allow you to join a team of skilled, devoted and passionate team of people whose priority is to provide the best healthcare and treatment to their patients. Example Answer: Training - One of the principal reasons I want to work within the NHS is because the healthcare system prides themselves on giving their employees the opportunity to advance their skills and develop their careers. Job Stability – It is important for me and my family to have job stability, and as most hospitals and healthcare centres in the UK are open 24/7 this means that I will always have full-time hours – allowing me to provide for my family. Improved Quality of Life – The UK has one of the largest economies in the world, provides an excellent opportunity for education and offers a good quality of life. Clinical Scenario Question Please note that you will also be asked a clinical scenario question in relation to your specialty. We cannot tell you what the clinical question will be, but the scenario will be set in a hypothetical doctor-patient context. You will be informed of the facts and then asked to diagnose the patient or state what further action is needed. If you would like speciality specific clinical scenario examples contact us at [email protected] - and we will be happy to provide these for you. A useful website/smartphone app ‘Geeky Medics’ provides free medical student revision resources, including OSCE guides, clinical skills videos, clinical cases and MCQ / SBA quizzes. Popular NHS Interview Questions by Skill Communication Skills How do you know you are a good communicator? How would you like to develop your skills further? Describe a time when you found it difficult to communicate with a colleague or patient. What did you do and how did you feel? Problem Solving and Decision Making Do you always know the right thing to do in any given situation? What is your strategy dealing with difficult problems at work? Describe a time when you felt you made the wrong decision. How did you feel and what has happened as a result? Managing Others and Team Involvement Describe a time when you led a team successfully Describe a time when you have supported a colleague with a work-related issue Outline a situation where you have had to motivate work colleagues to do something that they did not agree with? Which do you prefer, leading a team, or being a team member? Empathy and Sensitivity Why is it important for doctors to demonstrate empathy and sensitivity? Do you really need to show sensitivity and empathy to be a good doctor or are clinical skills and knowledge more important? Organisation and Planning How do you keep yourself organised at work? What strategies do you use to plan your work effectively? How do you cope when unexpected and unplanned work is added to your workload? Vigilance and Situational Awareness Why is vigilance an important attribute to have for this specialty? Describe an example of when your awareness of a developing situation at work, enabled you to avoid a problem Coping with Pressure How do you cope with pressure? What do you do when you can no longer cope with pressures of your workload? Professional Integrity Give an example of a clinical scenario where you made a mistake. What did you do about it? Is it ever justifiable to bend or break the rules at work? Have you ever done so? Clinical Knowledge and Expertise Describe a difficult clinical scenario you have been involved in. How did you contribute? You will be asked a range of questions about particular clinical scenarios relevant to your specialty. Research Skills Why is research important? Describe your last audit? Which is more important – research or teaching? Which do you prefer? Other Questions Why do you want to train in this specialty? What do you want from your career? Looking over your CV, could you pick two or three achievements which you are most proud of? We are interviewing many high calibre candidates today, why should we appoint you? If you are an IMG who wants to relocate to the UK and work for the NHS then send your CV to [email protected] – and one of our Specialist Advisers will be happy to guide and support you through your journey to the UK. We look forward to hearing from you! Alternatively, head over to our Facebook Group: IMG Advisor for an online support network of IMG’s who want to relocate to the UK.

NHS Relocation Packages

By Gabrielle Richardson
July 06, 2018

For many international doctors, it is their goal to relocate to the UK and work within the NHS. After taking various exams such as IELTS, PLAB or several postgraduate qualification papers you finally obtain your GMC Registration. Then before you know it you are interviewing and then secure a job offer. Accepting a job offer in a new country can be refreshing and exciting, but making the actual move is often stressful and overwhelming. Multiple factors are involved when you transition from one country to another, and so hospitals typically offer relocation packages to aid some of these relocation costs. The relocation package figure varies from hospital to hospital as they will each have their own Trust policy on relocation expenses. These expenses will qualify for tax relief if they are ‘reasonably provided’ in connection with a change in your residence. To qualify, the expenses must be incurred, or the benefits must be provided before the end of the tax year after the one in which your employment duties started. From experience, relocation packages typically start at £1,000 and the maximum amount is £8,000 as anything after that amount will be taxed. Please note that relocation packages are typically reserved for the more “hard-to-fill” posts and for the more senior level positions. Therefore, not all international doctors who take up an NHS position will be entitled to a relocation package. Types of Packages Point of Entry Under this package, the Trust may reimburse your expenses from the moment you enter the UK. This could include: Transportation: Any travel expenses you may have incurred since you arrived in the UK, such as travelling from the airport to the hospital or your new accommodation. Possibly travel costs to and from work for a certain period. Temporary Housing: The cost of temporary furnished rental housing or a hotel for a certain period can be provided. Rent and utility fees are typically included for rental housing. Removal Fees: The cost of removing your belongings and other related expenses may be included. Replacement domestic goods: This can include washing machines, tumble dryers, ovens, microwaves, kettles etc. All-inclusive relocation packages This package can include reimbursement of the above and other costs you may have incurred before entering the UK such as: Flights Documentation: Including International surcharge fees, visa fees etc Check what is included in the package Once you have received your job offer you should check what exactly is included in your relocation package. This will allow you to make arrangements to move – you don’t want to get stuck with expenses for items that you thought would be covered but aren’t. As hospitals will frequently deal with new employees relocating from overseas, they may connect you with their sub-contracted companies. Other hospitals may give you a lump sum to pay for relocation or ask you to keep all receipts for reimbursements. Ask for specifics beforehand and ask if it is possible to receive a hard copy of their relocation package policy. Negotiating your relocation packages If BDI Resourcing helped you find your first job within the NHS – then we will negotiate the relocation package for you. As previously mentioned, each Trust will have their own policy and so sometimes there is no room for negotiation. However, we will always set out to get the best package possible for all our doctors. Remember – Get the details in writing As with any job-related benefit, it is important to have all the details in writing. That way, both you and your new employer will be clear about expectations and coverage. If you are an international doctor who is interested in relocating to the UK and working within the NHS send your CV to [email protected] and we will be happy to help you. Come and say hello! Join our Facebook Group IMG Advisor to receive access to frequent blog posts, the opportunity to ask questions and meet other IMG’s.

How much will relocating to the UK cost me?

By Gabrielle Richardson
July 02, 2018

For many international doctors, it is their ultimate goal to relocate to the UK and work within the NHS. The reasons for this varies from doctor to doctor but the most popular reasons are to receive the opportunity to develop their skills and education, improve their quality of living or to join friends and family who already live here. Nevertheless, some IMG’s jump straight into the process without taking the time to think about how long the relocation process takes and most importantly how much it is going to cost. It is important to know the provisional costs of relocating to the UK, as often doctors who do not research into it before becoming de-motivated once they come across how much it will cost them. Therefore, in today’s article, we aim to guide you through each stage of the relocation stage via the PLAB route with an average fee – so you know what to expect before you embark on your journey. To practise medicine in the UK, all doctors need to be GMC Registered. Therefore, when you have made the decision to relocate it is important that your first goal is to become registered, not prioritising the job search which comes at a much later stage. To become GMC registered you must have the following: Recognised primary medical qualifications English language capability Registration and licensing history Certificates of Good Standing Knowledge and Skills ID Check For more detail on each GMC Registration requirement please visit our article. As you would have already obtained your primary medical qualification we will start with the next step, which is evidencing your English language capabilities. The GMC accept two ways to evidence this via IELTS or OET English language test Cost IELTS £160 OET £349 Please note that the price of IELTS varies test centre to test centre but it is typically £160. The price of OET is the same universally. Knowledge and Skills The GMC requires all UK doctors to possess the relevant knowledge and skills in order to practise safely. To evidence this to the GMC you will need to have either a GMC approved postgraduate qualification (a list can be found here) or pass the PLAB exams. PLAB test Cost Part 1 of the PLAB test £230 Part 2 of the PLAB test £840 Flights to the UK for your ID check/relocation Popular IMG one-way flight examples (three months in advance): Country Flight Price India £450 Pakistan £350 Iraq £300 Libya £380 Egypt £250 Saudi Arabia £300 UAE £200 Average flight cost £572.86 GMC Registration Cost Registration Price Application for a full registration with a licence to practise £150 Tier 2 Visa Application Application Cost Tier 2 (General) visa application £610 NHS surcharge £200 The NHS surcharge is £200 per year for all visa and immigration applications. For example, £1,000 for a five-year visa.  For the purposes of this article, we are giving you the cost of a one-year visa. In some cases, you may be able to claim back the cost of your Tier 2 visa application and NHS surcharge, but this is dependent on your relocation package. Total Cost Exam Total OET £349 PLAB 1 £230 PLAB 2 £840 Flight for PLAB 2 £572 Flight for ID check/relocation £572 GMC Registration Cost £150 Tier 2 visa application £610 Total £3,523 Please note we have not included the cost of your undergraduate degree or postgraduate degree so the overall cost will increase if you wanted to include these in your relocation cost. Although the above figures may feel overwhelming, it is important to remember that these costs are spread out over a couple of years. For most international doctors, the process is lengthy simply due to medical and family responsibilities. Therefore, the overall price will not feel as expensive. Don’t give up on your dream! There are a lot of steps to relocating to the UK, however, with determination it is achievable. If you would like support with your relocation get in contact with us at [email protected] and we will be happy to advise. Come and say hello! Join our Facebook Group IMG Advisor to gain access to frequent blog posts, the opportunity to ask questions and to meet other IMG’s.

What to expect when you interview an IMG

By Gabrielle Richardson
May 29, 2018

This blog is focused on providing NHS Trusts and IMG’s who are at the interview stage with all the information needed for the interview process. But first thing is first, why employ an IMG? It is global knowledge that the UK’s health system is currently suffering a staffing crisis and consequently, the NHS is spending twenty-five times as much on temporary staff than permanent staff to fill the rota gaps. Thus, to employ a permanent international doctor over a long-term agency locum doctor has many benefits. First, is cost-effectiveness. Reports reveal that one in thirty agency locum doctors earn £120 an hour. This amounts to paying some locum consultants £375k a year compared to a permanent consultant who would receive just £76-102k a year. This disparity is unjustified and so, to replace long-term temporary doctors with permanent staff will reduce a Trusts staffing costs dramatically. This would allow the extra finance to go towards research, equipment and increasing capacity. Second, is staff-retention. If you employ a permanent doctor over a temporary doctor this will not only benefit your hospital financially, but will also give doctors further confidence, and in turn, will create a better continuity of service to all patients as well as job satisfaction (ultimately increasing staff-retention). Remember The majority of international medical graduate candidates that you will be interviewing will be GMC Registered, the only exceptions will be those who require a Structured English Language Reference Form. Therefore, it is important to remember each candidate will be qualified, experienced and will be able to effectively communicate in English. GMC Registration for a licence to practise in the UK requires: English language assessment The GMC needs to be satisfied that the doctor can speak, read, write and listen in English, so the safety of patients is not at risk. Ways for a doctor to evidence their English language capabilities? IELTS OET Structured English Language Reference Form Knowledge and Skills The GMC also require all doctors who practise in the UK to demonstrate that they have the appropriate knowledge and skills. In summary, this can be done by: Passing PLAB Acceptable postgraduate qualification Gaining sponsorship by an approved sponsor Eligible for entry onto the Specialist Register or the GP Register Prior to the interview Check CV’s prior to interview Before the interview, it is crucial to consider the candidate's CV in advance. This will provide you with all the information needed, without needing to discover this in the interview. This will include employment history, educational background, IELTS/OET scores. If you know this before the interview you can then focus questions around getting acquainted with the candidate. Information such as why they want to relocate to the UK, why they have chosen to interview with your Trust, their career prospects, and whether their personality aligns with the Trusts values and visions. Furthermore, an IMG’s CV may possess words that mean something in their country, however, will translate to mean something else in NHS terms. To exemplify, often IMG’s use the word “Specialist”, which in the NHS would mean a Speciality Doctor, however, in other countries could mean “Consultant”. Second, “ICU experience” in Saudi Arabia will not equivalate to the same experience as “ICU experience” in the UK. Thus, you should clarify these difference in meanings during the interview. Scheduling From experience, Trusts tend to interview all international candidates for a position/series of positions within the same day. The reason for this is that, typically, there is always a Consultant in the interview panel, meaning they have a limited time frame to interview due to their other responsibilities. Therefore, when organising interviews, it is fundamental to set a time slot to conduct the interviews – and stick to the time slot. Often Trusts forget that IMG’s are taking time out of their working day to interview with them so it is not always possible for them to wait around. Skype Test Twenty-four hours before the interviews happen NHS Trusts should add the candidates so they can accept. This will save time during the interview slots and allow each interview to commence immediately – rather than waiting for an invitation and acceptance. During the interview Introductions When you first establish a Skype connection with the candidate it is important to create a warm and welcoming atmosphere. Often, the interviewing panel forgets that IMG’s are uprooting their whole entire life to move halfway across the world – and so first impressions of the UK, its people and their potential new employer are critical. From experience, IMG’s will tend to choose the department that they feel most comfortable with after speaking with them. Topics to cover One of the central reasons that IMG’s relocate to the UK is for the opportunity to develop their existing skills, gain new skills and improve their overall career aspects. Therefore, it is important to cover the following topics during the interview: Training Opportunities Orientation Periods Long-term Career Prospects CESR Opportunities To do so, will more likely mean that the candidate will accept a job offer from the Trust as it has been outlined from the outset that there is the opportunity for career and educational development. After the interview If you have decided that you would like to offer an IMG candidate the position after interviewing, it is important to review their CV and request relevant documentation quickly so an offer letter can be sent promptly. This is vital because often IMG’s interview with a series of NHS Trusts and a signed offer letter means you have filled your vacant post and will not have to interview again. So, if you are interested in using our services to help provide you with permanent doctors over costly agency locums then get in touch with us at [email protected] – and we will be happy to help! Alternatively, if you are an IMG who wants to relocate to the UK and work for the NHS then send your CV to [email protected] and one of our Specialist Advisers will be able to provide you with tailored advice.

Frequently Asked NHS Interview Questions with Answers

By Gabrielle Richardson
May 11, 2018

Frequently Asked NHS Interview Questions with Answers We are frequently asked what questions you will be asked during your NHS interviews, and often, for most, they do not know the right answer. When interviewing, there is never a “right” answer, but remember to be honest, remain calm, confident and interested in the position. In this article, we provide you with frequently asked questions in an NHS interview – and example answers that will impress your prospective employer. Typically, the NHS prefers to interview IMG candidates via Skype as often they are located across the world and cannot get to the UK easily. Remember to prepare for your interview in the following ways: Understand and know the job/person specification 2. Carry out research on the recruiting hospital and the interviewing department and knowledge of the interviews academic/professional background 3. Practice frequently asked interview questions 4. Prepare questions to ask the interviewing panel First Impression Tips: Dress Professionally Be Punctual to your interview slot Have a positive attitude Frequently Asked NHS Interview Questions Tell me about yourself This question will be asked at the beginning of the interview and is queried because the hospital want to hear about your employment history, training, education, your dreams (let them know they are in line with the position you are interviewing for) and any ties to the hospital or location you are applying to. Tip: Try and convey your message in a few brief sentences. Where do you see yourself in five years? This can often feel like a trick question, but it is important to be honest, while still providing the answers your interviewers want to know. Questions you should ask yourself before answering this question are: -Do you have realistic expectations for your career? -Are you ambitious? -Does the position you are interviewing for align with your growth and goals overall Our tip when answering this question is: Think about where this job role could realistically take you and then think about how that aligns with your professional goals. Example Answer: “I am really excited about this Clinical Fellow Paediatrics position because, in five years, I want to acclimatise to the NHS system and work in a supportive department that will enable me to, in the future, either complete my specialist registration via CESR or apply for a deanery training post. My long-term plan is to stay in the UK and hopefully become a consultant.” If there was a misunderstanding between two colleagues what should you do? In group settings, at some point, you will encounter conflict. As an individual who works with the general public, it is important that you mediate conflict quickly and efficiently. Example Answer: If I noticed a hostile environment between two colleagues, I would suggest for them to both meet privately with me. I would ask them to summarise the situation from their own viewpoint and I would reinforce that this can only be resolved through discussion and negotiation. Why do you want to work in the UK? The NHS is one of the largest healthcare systems in the world and the largest employer in the UK and Europe. Therefore, for many doctors across the globe working in the NHS will allow you to join a team of skilled, devoted and passionate team of people whose priority is to provide the best healthcare and treatment to their patients. Example Answer: Training - One of the principal reasons I want to work within the NHS is because the healthcare system prides themselves on giving their employees the opportunity to advance their skills and develop their careers. Job Stability – It is important for me and my family to have job stability, and as most hospitals and healthcare centres in the UK are open 24/7 this means that I will always have full-time hours – allowing me to provide for my family. Improved Quality of Life – The UK has one of the largest economies in the world, provides an excellent opportunity for education and offers a good quality of life. Clinical Scenario Question Please note that you will also be asked a clinical scenario question in relation to your specialty. We cannot tell you what the clinical question will be, but the scenario will be set in a hypothetical doctor-patient context. You will be informed of the facts and then asked to diagnose the patient or state what further action is needed. If you would like speciality specific clinical scenario examples contact us at [email protected] - and we will be happy to provide these for you. A useful website/smartphone app ‘Geeky Medics’ provides free medical student revision resources, including OSCE guides, clinical skills videos, clinical cases and MCQ / SBA quizzes. Popular NHS Interview Questions by Skill Communication Skills How do you know you are a good communicator? How would you like to develop your skills further? Describe a time when you found it difficult to communicate with a colleague or patient. What did you do and how did you feel? Problem Solving and Decision Making Do you always know the right thing to do in any given situation? What is your strategy dealing with difficult problems at work? Describe a time when you felt you made the wrong decision. How did you feel and what has happened as a result? Managing Others and Team Involvement Describe a time when you led a team successfully Describe a time when you have supported a colleague with a work-related issue Outline a situation where you have had to motivate work colleagues to do something that they did not agree with? Which do you prefer, leading a team, or being a team member? Empathy and Sensitivity Why is it important for doctors to demonstrate empathy and sensitivity? Do you really need to show sensitivity and empathy to be a good doctor or are clinical skills and knowledge more important? Organisation and Planning How do you keep yourself organised at work? What strategies do you use to plan your work effectively? How do you cope when unexpected and unplanned work is added to your workload? Vigilance and Situational Awareness Why is vigilance an important attribute to have for this specialty? Describe an example of when your awareness of a developing situation at work, enabled you to avoid a problem Coping with Pressure How do you cope with pressure? What do you do when you can no longer cope with pressures of your workload? Professional Integrity Give an example of a clinical scenario where you made a mistake. What did you do about it? Is it ever justifiable to bend or break the rules at work? Have you ever done so? Clinical Knowledge and Expertise Describe a difficult clinical scenario you have been involved in. How did you contribute? You will be asked a range of questions about particular clinical scenarios relevant to your specialty. Research Skills Why is research important? Describe your last audit? Which is more important – research or teaching? Which do you prefer? Other Questions Why do you want to train in this specialty? What do you want from your career? Looking over your CV, could you pick two or three achievements which you are most proud of? We are interviewing many high calibre candidates today, why should we appoint you?   If you are an IMG who wants to relocate to the UK and work for the NHS then send your CV to [email protected] – and one of our Specialist Advisers will be happy to guide and support you through your journey to the UK. We look forward to hearing from you! Alternatively, head over to our Facebook Group: IMG Advisor for an online support network of IMG’s who want to relocate to the UK.

Why the NHS needs to employ more permanent doctors

By Gabrielle Richardson
April 27, 2018

Why the NHS needs to employ more permanent doctors The NHS are currently facing a staffing crisis and consequently, they rely on expensive agency locum staff, spending 25 times as much on temporary staff than permanent staff. This trend is incomprehensible as the NHS is also experiencing severe government funding cuts. This year, on average, the UK’s healthcare system will spend over £3 billion on agency locum staff, funds that could be spent on more important Trust areas such as; the recruitment of permanent staff, medical research, patient care, drugs, equipment and increasing facility size. The inexplicably high fees paid by NHS Trusts needs to change to allow all Trusts to offer excellent continuity of care to all patients. In this article, we highlight the three focal reasons for the NHS to start employing more permanent staff over costly long-term agency locums: cost-effectiveness; staff retention; and reduced conflict. Reasons to use International Permanent Doctors Cost-effectiveness It is reported that 1 in 30 agency locum doctors earn £120 an hour, which is clearly not a sustainable method of recruitment. The most common reason for using an agency locum is simply a vacant post, other reasons include sickness, maternity, and paternity leave. However, each NHS Trust is spending nearly 25 times as much on long-term agency fees as they do on permanent positions. This amounts to paying some locum consultants £375k a year compared to a permanent senior consultant receiving just £76-102k a year. This large income disparity means that a locum consultant will often get paid 114% more than a permanent consultant, even though they are performing the same job role (albeit with reduced management responsibilities). Furthermore, although agency locum staff are hired with the aim to fill a temporary gap of employment, such as a consultant’s maternity leave – often agency locum’s can stay in a post at a hospital for several years. This is very problematic because the locum will continue to renew his contract every couple of months, and not agree to become a permanent staff member. Therefore, the obvious solution to end this significant expenditure on temporary staff is to invest in permanent staff who will only cost the Trust a one-off fee when their contract is signed. Here at BDI Resourcing, our goal is to provide the NHS with sustainable staffing solutions by providing permanent international doctors, and on average our services cost less than 10% of the cost of employing an agency locum over a 12-month period. Staff Retention Having staff who are fully trained and equipped with the appropriate knowledge and skills to perform their job efficiently is essential for a successful organisation, however, within the healthcare sector, it is especially important that this is the case. Training a permanent doctor will not only benefit your hospital financially, but it will also give doctors further confidence, resulting in better continuity of service to all patients and job satisfaction (ultimately increasing staff retention). 2.1 Empowerment and Confidence: If employees feel confident in their knowledge, skills, and training they will feel more self-assured about the job overall. Therefore, they will be more likely to take on new challenges and responsibilities within the hospital. 2.2 Continuity of Care: Research conducted by the NHS staff survey found clear and strong associations between staff abilities and how satisfied patients are. This means that a more confident and comfortable permanent doctor, over an agency locum doctor who may never have worked in the hospital before, will give a better continuity of care to patients. 2.3 Retention of Staff and Happier Working Environment: Doctors who receive training and are given the opportunity for educational development from their employer are more likely to feel satisfied with their job. In turn, this will lead to an increase in staff retention, which will benefit the whole organisation. Furthermore, having a fully-staffed department will lead to less sick days, less pressure on staff and overall a happier working environment! There are of course many benefits of an increase in staff retention and because you will no longer have to pay expensive long-term agency locum fees, you can instead use the money on investing in patients and employees. Second, is loyalty. Longstanding members of staff are inevitably more loyal than temporary staff. They will believe in the hospital, want the best for it, whilst developing a positive working relationship with peers, managers, and patients. This will make them easier to motivate, share expertise and help co-workers and to provide a better continuity of care to patients. Reduced Conflict The NHS spends over £3 billion a year and on an average day, there are an estimated 3,500 agency locums working in England and Wales. Consequently, it has been described by NHS staff that there are tense and hostile relationships between permanent members of staff and agency locum staff because of the inequality and differences in pay and/or responsibilities. This atmosphere in a hospital environment can be worrying as the focus is taken away from the excellent quality and continuity of care which is expected to be provided. Therefore, by employing permanent staff over agency locum staff – the permanent staff already employed at the hospital will feel of equal value and there will be less chance of hostility between staff. To summarise, BDI Resourcing entirely understands that short-term agency locum staff are often needed due to NHS Trust staff sickness and holiday but we are very passionate about increasing the number of permanent doctors to replace long-term agency locums. Our passion derives from two fundamental reasons: First, it is critical for NHS Trusts to start reducing their unnecessary expenditure on long-term agency locum staff, to allow them to increase their expenditure in other important areas such as increasing facility size, equipment, and medical research. Second, if NHS Trusts cut their spending on long-term agency locums and replace them with permanent doctors this will create a strong continuity of care to patients. Cost-effective health care will improve primary care as the trust will become stronger over time as doctors and patients grow to know each other better through experience, creating compassion and commitment from permanent doctors. Because of our passion to provide the NHS with a sustainable staffing solution and to save Trusts money – this year alone, we have worked with over 50 Trusts and saved the NHS over £10.5 million. So, if you are interested in using our services to help provide you with permanent doctors over costly agency locums then get in touch with us at [email protected] – and we will be happy to help! Alternatively, if you are an IMG who wants to relocate to the UK and work for the NHS then send your CV to [email protected] and one of our Specialist Advisers will be able to provide you with tailored advice.

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