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NHS Interview Questions with Answers

By Gabrielle Richardson
August 13, 2018

We are frequently asked what questions you will be asked during your NHS interviews, and often, for most, they do not know the right answer. When interviewing, there is never a “right” answer, but remember to be honest, remain calm, confident and interested in the position. In this article, we provide you with frequently asked questions in an NHS interview – and example answers that will impress your prospective employer. Typically, the NHS prefers to interview IMG candidates via Skype as often they are located across the world and cannot get to the UK easily. Remember to prepare for your interview in the following ways: Understand and know the job/person specification 2. Carry out research on the recruiting hospital and the interviewing department and knowledge of the interviews academic/professional background 3. Practice frequently asked interview questions 4. Prepare questions to ask the interviewing panel First Impression Tips: Dress Professionally Be Punctual to your interview slot Have a positive attitude Frequently Asked NHS Interview Questions Tell me about yourself This question will be asked at the beginning of the interview and is queried because the hospital want to hear about your employment history, training, education, your dreams (let them know they are in line with the position you are interviewing for) and any ties to the hospital or location you are applying to. Tip: Try and convey your message in a few brief sentences. Where do you see yourself in five years? This can often feel like a trick question, but it is important to be honest, while still providing the answers your interviewers want to know. Questions you should ask yourself before answering this question are: -Do you have realistic expectations for your career? -Are you ambitious? -Does the position you are interviewing for align with your growth and goals overall Our tip when answering this question is: Think about where this job role could realistically take you and then think about how that aligns with your professional goals. Example Answer: “I am really excited about this Clinical Fellow Paediatrics position because, in five years, I want to acclimatise to the NHS system and work in a supportive department that will enable me to, in the future, either complete my specialist registration via CESR or apply for a deanery training post. My long-term plan is to stay in the UK and hopefully become a consultant.” If there was a misunderstanding between two colleagues what should you do? In group settings, at some point, you will encounter conflict. As an individual who works with the general public, it is important that you mediate conflict quickly and efficiently. Example Answer: If I noticed a hostile environment between two colleagues, I would suggest for them to both meet privately with me. I would ask them to summarise the situation from their own viewpoint and I would reinforce that this can only be resolved through discussion and negotiation. Why do you want to work in the UK? The NHS is one of the largest healthcare systems in the world and the largest employer in the UK and Europe. Therefore, for many doctors across the globe working in the NHS will allow you to join a team of skilled, devoted and passionate team of people whose priority is to provide the best healthcare and treatment to their patients. Example Answer: Training - One of the principal reasons I want to work within the NHS is because the healthcare system prides themselves on giving their employees the opportunity to advance their skills and develop their careers. Job Stability – It is important for me and my family to have job stability, and as most hospitals and healthcare centres in the UK are open 24/7 this means that I will always have full-time hours – allowing me to provide for my family. Improved Quality of Life – The UK has one of the largest economies in the world, provides an excellent opportunity for education and offers a good quality of life. Clinical Scenario Question Please note that you will also be asked a clinical scenario question in relation to your specialty. We cannot tell you what the clinical question will be, but the scenario will be set in a hypothetical doctor-patient context. You will be informed of the facts and then asked to diagnose the patient or state what further action is needed. If you would like speciality specific clinical scenario examples contact us at apply@bdiresourcing.com - and we will be happy to provide these for you. A useful website/smartphone app ‘Geeky Medics’ provides free medical student revision resources, including OSCE guides, clinical skills videos, clinical cases and MCQ / SBA quizzes. Popular NHS Interview Questions by Skill Communication Skills How do you know you are a good communicator? How would you like to develop your skills further? Describe a time when you found it difficult to communicate with a colleague or patient. What did you do and how did you feel? Problem Solving and Decision Making Do you always know the right thing to do in any given situation? What is your strategy dealing with difficult problems at work? Describe a time when you felt you made the wrong decision. How did you feel and what has happened as a result? Managing Others and Team Involvement Describe a time when you led a team successfully Describe a time when you have supported a colleague with a work-related issue Outline a situation where you have had to motivate work colleagues to do something that they did not agree with? Which do you prefer, leading a team, or being a team member? Empathy and Sensitivity Why is it important for doctors to demonstrate empathy and sensitivity? Do you really need to show sensitivity and empathy to be a good doctor or are clinical skills and knowledge more important? Organisation and Planning How do you keep yourself organised at work? What strategies do you use to plan your work effectively? How do you cope when unexpected and unplanned work is added to your workload? Vigilance and Situational Awareness Why is vigilance an important attribute to have for this specialty? Describe an example of when your awareness of a developing situation at work, enabled you to avoid a problem Coping with Pressure How do you cope with pressure? What do you do when you can no longer cope with pressures of your workload? Professional Integrity Give an example of a clinical scenario where you made a mistake. What did you do about it? Is it ever justifiable to bend or break the rules at work? Have you ever done so? Clinical Knowledge and Expertise Describe a difficult clinical scenario you have been involved in. How did you contribute? You will be asked a range of questions about particular clinical scenarios relevant to your specialty. Research Skills Why is research important? Describe your last audit? Which is more important – research or teaching? Which do you prefer? Other Questions Why do you want to train in this specialty? What do you want from your career? Looking over your CV, could you pick two or three achievements which you are most proud of? We are interviewing many high calibre candidates today, why should we appoint you? If you are an IMG who wants to relocate to the UK and work for the NHS then send your CV to apply@bdiresourcing.com – and one of our Specialist Advisers will be happy to guide and support you through your journey to the UK. We look forward to hearing from you! Alternatively, head over to our Facebook Group: IMG Advisor for an online support network of IMG’s who want to relocate to the UK.

NHS Relocation Packages

By Gabrielle Richardson
July 06, 2018

For many international doctors, it is their goal to relocate to the UK and work within the NHS. After taking various exams such as IELTS, PLAB or several postgraduate qualification papers you finally obtain your GMC Registration. Then before you know it you are interviewing and then secure a job offer. Accepting a job offer in a new country can be refreshing and exciting, but making the actual move is often stressful and overwhelming. Multiple factors are involved when you transition from one country to another, and so hospitals typically offer relocation packages to aid some of these relocation costs. The relocation package figure varies from hospital to hospital as they will each have their own Trust policy on relocation expenses. These expenses will qualify for tax relief if they are ‘reasonably provided’ in connection with a change in your residence. To qualify, the expenses must be incurred, or the benefits must be provided before the end of the tax year after the one in which your employment duties started. From experience, relocation packages typically start at £1,000 and the maximum amount is £8,000 as anything after that amount will be taxed. Please note that relocation packages are typically reserved for the more “hard-to-fill” posts and for the more senior level positions. Therefore, not all international doctors who take up an NHS position will be entitled to a relocation package. Types of Packages Point of Entry Under this package, the Trust may reimburse your expenses from the moment you enter the UK. This could include: Transportation: Any travel expenses you may have incurred since you arrived in the UK, such as travelling from the airport to the hospital or your new accommodation. Possibly travel costs to and from work for a certain period. Temporary Housing: The cost of temporary furnished rental housing or a hotel for a certain period can be provided. Rent and utility fees are typically included for rental housing. Removal Fees: The cost of removing your belongings and other related expenses may be included. Replacement domestic goods: This can include washing machines, tumble dryers, ovens, microwaves, kettles etc. All-inclusive relocation packages This package can include reimbursement of the above and other costs you may have incurred before entering the UK such as: Flights Documentation: Including International surcharge fees, visa fees etc Check what is included in the package Once you have received your job offer you should check what exactly is included in your relocation package. This will allow you to make arrangements to move – you don’t want to get stuck with expenses for items that you thought would be covered but aren’t. As hospitals will frequently deal with new employees relocating from overseas, they may connect you with their sub-contracted companies. Other hospitals may give you a lump sum to pay for relocation or ask you to keep all receipts for reimbursements. Ask for specifics beforehand and ask if it is possible to receive a hard copy of their relocation package policy. Negotiating your relocation packages If BDI Resourcing helped you find your first job within the NHS – then we will negotiate the relocation package for you. As previously mentioned, each Trust will have their own policy and so sometimes there is no room for negotiation. However, we will always set out to get the best package possible for all our doctors. Remember – Get the details in writing As with any job-related benefit, it is important to have all the details in writing. That way, both you and your new employer will be clear about expectations and coverage. If you are an international doctor who is interested in relocating to the UK and working within the NHS send your CV to apply@bdiresourcing.com and we will be happy to help you. Come and say hello! Join our Facebook Group IMG Advisor to receive access to frequent blog posts, the opportunity to ask questions and meet other IMG’s.

How much will relocating to the UK cost me?

By Gabrielle Richardson
July 02, 2018

For many international doctors, it is their ultimate goal to relocate to the UK and work within the NHS. The reasons for this varies from doctor to doctor but the most popular reasons are to receive the opportunity to develop their skills and education, improve their quality of living or to join friends and family who already live here. Nevertheless, some IMG’s jump straight into the process without taking the time to think about how long the relocation process takes and most importantly how much it is going to cost. It is important to know the provisional costs of relocating to the UK, as often doctors who do not research into it before becoming de-motivated once they come across how much it will cost them. Therefore, in today’s article, we aim to guide you through each stage of the relocation stage via the PLAB route with an average fee – so you know what to expect before you embark on your journey. To practise medicine in the UK, all doctors need to be GMC Registered. Therefore, when you have made the decision to relocate it is important that your first goal is to become registered, not prioritising the job search which comes at a much later stage. To become GMC registered you must have the following: Recognised primary medical qualifications English language capability Registration and licensing history Certificates of Good Standing Knowledge and Skills ID Check For more detail on each GMC Registration requirement please visit our article. As you would have already obtained your primary medical qualification we will start with the next step, which is evidencing your English language capabilities. The GMC accept two ways to evidence this via IELTS or OET English language test Cost IELTS £160 OET £349 Please note that the price of IELTS varies test centre to test centre but it is typically £160. The price of OET is the same universally. Knowledge and Skills The GMC requires all UK doctors to possess the relevant knowledge and skills in order to practise safely. To evidence this to the GMC you will need to have either a GMC approved postgraduate qualification (a list can be found here) or pass the PLAB exams. PLAB test Cost Part 1 of the PLAB test £230 Part 2 of the PLAB test £840 Flights to the UK for your ID check/relocation Popular IMG one-way flight examples (three months in advance): Country Flight Price India £450 Pakistan £350 Iraq £300 Libya £380 Egypt £250 Saudi Arabia £300 UAE £200 Average flight cost £572.86 GMC Registration Cost Registration Price Application for a full registration with a licence to practise £150 Tier 2 Visa Application Application Cost Tier 2 (General) visa application £610 NHS surcharge £200 The NHS surcharge is £200 per year for all visa and immigration applications. For example, £1,000 for a five-year visa.  For the purposes of this article, we are giving you the cost of a one-year visa. In some cases, you may be able to claim back the cost of your Tier 2 visa application and NHS surcharge, but this is dependent on your relocation package. Total Cost Exam Total OET £349 PLAB 1 £230 PLAB 2 £840 Flight for PLAB 2 £572 Flight for ID check/relocation £572 GMC Registration Cost £150 Tier 2 visa application £610 Total £3,523 Please note we have not included the cost of your undergraduate degree or postgraduate degree so the overall cost will increase if you wanted to include these in your relocation cost. Although the above figures may feel overwhelming, it is important to remember that these costs are spread out over a couple of years. For most international doctors, the process is lengthy simply due to medical and family responsibilities. Therefore, the overall price will not feel as expensive. Don’t give up on your dream! There are a lot of steps to relocating to the UK, however, with determination it is achievable. If you would like support with your relocation get in contact with us at apply@bdiresourcing.com and we will be happy to advise. Come and say hello! Join our Facebook Group IMG Advisor to gain access to frequent blog posts, the opportunity to ask questions and to meet other IMG’s.

What to expect when you interview an IMG

By Gabrielle Richardson
May 29, 2018

This blog is focused on providing NHS Trusts and IMG’s who are at the interview stage with all the information needed for the interview process. But first thing is first, why employ an IMG? It is global knowledge that the UK’s health system is currently suffering a staffing crisis and consequently, the NHS is spending twenty-five times as much on temporary staff than permanent staff to fill the rota gaps. Thus, to employ a permanent international doctor over a long-term agency locum doctor has many benefits. First, is cost-effectiveness. Reports reveal that one in thirty agency locum doctors earn £120 an hour. This amounts to paying some locum consultants £375k a year compared to a permanent consultant who would receive just £76-102k a year. This disparity is unjustified and so, to replace long-term temporary doctors with permanent staff will reduce a Trusts staffing costs dramatically. This would allow the extra finance to go towards research, equipment and increasing capacity. Second, is staff-retention. If you employ a permanent doctor over a temporary doctor this will not only benefit your hospital financially, but will also give doctors further confidence, and in turn, will create a better continuity of service to all patients as well as job satisfaction (ultimately increasing staff-retention). Remember The majority of international medical graduate candidates that you will be interviewing will be GMC Registered, the only exceptions will be those who require a Structured English Language Reference Form. Therefore, it is important to remember each candidate will be qualified, experienced and will be able to effectively communicate in English. GMC Registration for a licence to practise in the UK requires: English language assessment The GMC needs to be satisfied that the doctor can speak, read, write and listen in English, so the safety of patients is not at risk. Ways for a doctor to evidence their English language capabilities? IELTS OET Structured English Language Reference Form Knowledge and Skills The GMC also require all doctors who practise in the UK to demonstrate that they have the appropriate knowledge and skills. In summary, this can be done by: Passing PLAB Acceptable postgraduate qualification Gaining sponsorship by an approved sponsor Eligible for entry onto the Specialist Register or the GP Register Prior to the interview Check CV’s prior to interview Before the interview, it is crucial to consider the candidate's CV in advance. This will provide you with all the information needed, without needing to discover this in the interview. This will include employment history, educational background, IELTS/OET scores. If you know this before the interview you can then focus questions around getting acquainted with the candidate. Information such as why they want to relocate to the UK, why they have chosen to interview with your Trust, their career prospects, and whether their personality aligns with the Trusts values and visions. Furthermore, an IMG’s CV may possess words that mean something in their country, however, will translate to mean something else in NHS terms. To exemplify, often IMG’s use the word “Specialist”, which in the NHS would mean a Speciality Doctor, however, in other countries could mean “Consultant”. Second, “ICU experience” in Saudi Arabia will not equivalate to the same experience as “ICU experience” in the UK. Thus, you should clarify these difference in meanings during the interview. Scheduling From experience, Trusts tend to interview all international candidates for a position/series of positions within the same day. The reason for this is that, typically, there is always a Consultant in the interview panel, meaning they have a limited time frame to interview due to their other responsibilities. Therefore, when organising interviews, it is fundamental to set a time slot to conduct the interviews – and stick to the time slot. Often Trusts forget that IMG’s are taking time out of their working day to interview with them so it is not always possible for them to wait around. Skype Test Twenty-four hours before the interviews happen NHS Trusts should add the candidates so they can accept. This will save time during the interview slots and allow each interview to commence immediately – rather than waiting for an invitation and acceptance. During the interview Introductions When you first establish a Skype connection with the candidate it is important to create a warm and welcoming atmosphere. Often, the interviewing panel forgets that IMG’s are uprooting their whole entire life to move halfway across the world – and so first impressions of the UK, its people and their potential new employer are critical. From experience, IMG’s will tend to choose the department that they feel most comfortable with after speaking with them. Topics to cover One of the central reasons that IMG’s relocate to the UK is for the opportunity to develop their existing skills, gain new skills and improve their overall career aspects. Therefore, it is important to cover the following topics during the interview: Training Opportunities Orientation Periods Long-term Career Prospects CESR Opportunities To do so, will more likely mean that the candidate will accept a job offer from the Trust as it has been outlined from the outset that there is the opportunity for career and educational development. After the interview If you have decided that you would like to offer an IMG candidate the position after interviewing, it is important to review their CV and request relevant documentation quickly so an offer letter can be sent promptly. This is vital because often IMG’s interview with a series of NHS Trusts and a signed offer letter means you have filled your vacant post and will not have to interview again. So, if you are interested in using our services to help provide you with permanent doctors over costly agency locums then get in touch with us at info@bdiresourcing.com – and we will be happy to help! Alternatively, if you are an IMG who wants to relocate to the UK and work for the NHS then send your CV to apply@bdiresourcing.com and one of our Specialist Advisers will be able to provide you with tailored advice.

Frequently Asked NHS Interview Questions with Answers

By Gabrielle Richardson
May 11, 2018

Frequently Asked NHS Interview Questions with Answers We are frequently asked what questions you will be asked during your NHS interviews, and often, for most, they do not know the right answer. When interviewing, there is never a “right” answer, but remember to be honest, remain calm, confident and interested in the position. In this article, we provide you with frequently asked questions in an NHS interview – and example answers that will impress your prospective employer. Typically, the NHS prefers to interview IMG candidates via Skype as often they are located across the world and cannot get to the UK easily. Remember to prepare for your interview in the following ways: Understand and know the job/person specification 2. Carry out research on the recruiting hospital and the interviewing department and knowledge of the interviews academic/professional background 3. Practice frequently asked interview questions 4. Prepare questions to ask the interviewing panel First Impression Tips: Dress Professionally Be Punctual to your interview slot Have a positive attitude Frequently Asked NHS Interview Questions Tell me about yourself This question will be asked at the beginning of the interview and is queried because the hospital want to hear about your employment history, training, education, your dreams (let them know they are in line with the position you are interviewing for) and any ties to the hospital or location you are applying to. Tip: Try and convey your message in a few brief sentences. Where do you see yourself in five years? This can often feel like a trick question, but it is important to be honest, while still providing the answers your interviewers want to know. Questions you should ask yourself before answering this question are: -Do you have realistic expectations for your career? -Are you ambitious? -Does the position you are interviewing for align with your growth and goals overall Our tip when answering this question is: Think about where this job role could realistically take you and then think about how that aligns with your professional goals. Example Answer: “I am really excited about this Clinical Fellow Paediatrics position because, in five years, I want to acclimatise to the NHS system and work in a supportive department that will enable me to, in the future, either complete my specialist registration via CESR or apply for a deanery training post. My long-term plan is to stay in the UK and hopefully become a consultant.” If there was a misunderstanding between two colleagues what should you do? In group settings, at some point, you will encounter conflict. As an individual who works with the general public, it is important that you mediate conflict quickly and efficiently. Example Answer: If I noticed a hostile environment between two colleagues, I would suggest for them to both meet privately with me. I would ask them to summarise the situation from their own viewpoint and I would reinforce that this can only be resolved through discussion and negotiation. Why do you want to work in the UK? The NHS is one of the largest healthcare systems in the world and the largest employer in the UK and Europe. Therefore, for many doctors across the globe working in the NHS will allow you to join a team of skilled, devoted and passionate team of people whose priority is to provide the best healthcare and treatment to their patients. Example Answer: Training - One of the principal reasons I want to work within the NHS is because the healthcare system prides themselves on giving their employees the opportunity to advance their skills and develop their careers. Job Stability – It is important for me and my family to have job stability, and as most hospitals and healthcare centres in the UK are open 24/7 this means that I will always have full-time hours – allowing me to provide for my family. Improved Quality of Life – The UK has one of the largest economies in the world, provides an excellent opportunity for education and offers a good quality of life. Clinical Scenario Question Please note that you will also be asked a clinical scenario question in relation to your specialty. We cannot tell you what the clinical question will be, but the scenario will be set in a hypothetical doctor-patient context. You will be informed of the facts and then asked to diagnose the patient or state what further action is needed. If you would like speciality specific clinical scenario examples contact us at apply@bdiresourcing.com - and we will be happy to provide these for you. A useful website/smartphone app ‘Geeky Medics’ provides free medical student revision resources, including OSCE guides, clinical skills videos, clinical cases and MCQ / SBA quizzes. Popular NHS Interview Questions by Skill Communication Skills How do you know you are a good communicator? How would you like to develop your skills further? Describe a time when you found it difficult to communicate with a colleague or patient. What did you do and how did you feel? Problem Solving and Decision Making Do you always know the right thing to do in any given situation? What is your strategy dealing with difficult problems at work? Describe a time when you felt you made the wrong decision. How did you feel and what has happened as a result? Managing Others and Team Involvement Describe a time when you led a team successfully Describe a time when you have supported a colleague with a work-related issue Outline a situation where you have had to motivate work colleagues to do something that they did not agree with? Which do you prefer, leading a team, or being a team member? Empathy and Sensitivity Why is it important for doctors to demonstrate empathy and sensitivity? Do you really need to show sensitivity and empathy to be a good doctor or are clinical skills and knowledge more important? Organisation and Planning How do you keep yourself organised at work? What strategies do you use to plan your work effectively? How do you cope when unexpected and unplanned work is added to your workload? Vigilance and Situational Awareness Why is vigilance an important attribute to have for this specialty? Describe an example of when your awareness of a developing situation at work, enabled you to avoid a problem Coping with Pressure How do you cope with pressure? What do you do when you can no longer cope with pressures of your workload? Professional Integrity Give an example of a clinical scenario where you made a mistake. What did you do about it? Is it ever justifiable to bend or break the rules at work? Have you ever done so? Clinical Knowledge and Expertise Describe a difficult clinical scenario you have been involved in. How did you contribute? You will be asked a range of questions about particular clinical scenarios relevant to your specialty. Research Skills Why is research important? Describe your last audit? Which is more important – research or teaching? Which do you prefer? Other Questions Why do you want to train in this specialty? What do you want from your career? Looking over your CV, could you pick two or three achievements which you are most proud of? We are interviewing many high calibre candidates today, why should we appoint you?   If you are an IMG who wants to relocate to the UK and work for the NHS then send your CV to apply@bdiresourcing.com – and one of our Specialist Advisers will be happy to guide and support you through your journey to the UK. We look forward to hearing from you! Alternatively, head over to our Facebook Group: IMG Advisor for an online support network of IMG’s who want to relocate to the UK.

Why the NHS needs to employ more permanent doctors

By Gabrielle Richardson
April 27, 2018

Why the NHS needs to employ more permanent doctors The NHS are currently facing a staffing crisis and consequently, they rely on expensive agency locum staff, spending 25 times as much on temporary staff than permanent staff. This trend is incomprehensible as the NHS is also experiencing severe government funding cuts. This year, on average, the UK’s healthcare system will spend over £3 billion on agency locum staff, funds that could be spent on more important Trust areas such as; the recruitment of permanent staff, medical research, patient care, drugs, equipment and increasing facility size. The inexplicably high fees paid by NHS Trusts needs to change to allow all Trusts to offer excellent continuity of care to all patients. In this article, we highlight the three focal reasons for the NHS to start employing more permanent staff over costly long-term agency locums: cost-effectiveness; staff retention; and reduced conflict. Reasons to use International Permanent Doctors Cost-effectiveness It is reported that 1 in 30 agency locum doctors earn £120 an hour, which is clearly not a sustainable method of recruitment. The most common reason for using an agency locum is simply a vacant post, other reasons include sickness, maternity, and paternity leave. However, each NHS Trust is spending nearly 25 times as much on long-term agency fees as they do on permanent positions. This amounts to paying some locum consultants £375k a year compared to a permanent senior consultant receiving just £76-102k a year. This large income disparity means that a locum consultant will often get paid 114% more than a permanent consultant, even though they are performing the same job role (albeit with reduced management responsibilities). Furthermore, although agency locum staff are hired with the aim to fill a temporary gap of employment, such as a consultant’s maternity leave – often agency locum’s can stay in a post at a hospital for several years. This is very problematic because the locum will continue to renew his contract every couple of months, and not agree to become a permanent staff member. Therefore, the obvious solution to end this significant expenditure on temporary staff is to invest in permanent staff who will only cost the Trust a one-off fee when their contract is signed. Here at BDI Resourcing, our goal is to provide the NHS with sustainable staffing solutions by providing permanent international doctors, and on average our services cost less than 10% of the cost of employing an agency locum over a 12-month period. Staff Retention Having staff who are fully trained and equipped with the appropriate knowledge and skills to perform their job efficiently is essential for a successful organisation, however, within the healthcare sector, it is especially important that this is the case. Training a permanent doctor will not only benefit your hospital financially, but it will also give doctors further confidence, resulting in better continuity of service to all patients and job satisfaction (ultimately increasing staff retention). 2.1 Empowerment and Confidence: If employees feel confident in their knowledge, skills, and training they will feel more self-assured about the job overall. Therefore, they will be more likely to take on new challenges and responsibilities within the hospital. 2.2 Continuity of Care: Research conducted by the NHS staff survey found clear and strong associations between staff abilities and how satisfied patients are. This means that a more confident and comfortable permanent doctor, over an agency locum doctor who may never have worked in the hospital before, will give a better continuity of care to patients. 2.3 Retention of Staff and Happier Working Environment: Doctors who receive training and are given the opportunity for educational development from their employer are more likely to feel satisfied with their job. In turn, this will lead to an increase in staff retention, which will benefit the whole organisation. Furthermore, having a fully-staffed department will lead to less sick days, less pressure on staff and overall a happier working environment! There are of course many benefits of an increase in staff retention and because you will no longer have to pay expensive long-term agency locum fees, you can instead use the money on investing in patients and employees. Second, is loyalty. Longstanding members of staff are inevitably more loyal than temporary staff. They will believe in the hospital, want the best for it, whilst developing a positive working relationship with peers, managers, and patients. This will make them easier to motivate, share expertise and help co-workers and to provide a better continuity of care to patients. Reduced Conflict The NHS spends over £3 billion a year and on an average day, there are an estimated 3,500 agency locums working in England and Wales. Consequently, it has been described by NHS staff that there are tense and hostile relationships between permanent members of staff and agency locum staff because of the inequality and differences in pay and/or responsibilities. This atmosphere in a hospital environment can be worrying as the focus is taken away from the excellent quality and continuity of care which is expected to be provided. Therefore, by employing permanent staff over agency locum staff – the permanent staff already employed at the hospital will feel of equal value and there will be less chance of hostility between staff. To summarise, BDI Resourcing entirely understands that short-term agency locum staff are often needed due to NHS Trust staff sickness and holiday but we are very passionate about increasing the number of permanent doctors to replace long-term agency locums. Our passion derives from two fundamental reasons: First, it is critical for NHS Trusts to start reducing their unnecessary expenditure on long-term agency locum staff, to allow them to increase their expenditure in other important areas such as increasing facility size, equipment, and medical research. Second, if NHS Trusts cut their spending on long-term agency locums and replace them with permanent doctors this will create a strong continuity of care to patients. Cost-effective health care will improve primary care as the trust will become stronger over time as doctors and patients grow to know each other better through experience, creating compassion and commitment from permanent doctors. Because of our passion to provide the NHS with a sustainable staffing solution and to save Trusts money – this year alone, we have worked with over 50 Trusts and saved the NHS over £10.5 million. So, if you are interested in using our services to help provide you with permanent doctors over costly agency locums then get in touch with us at info@bdiresourcing.com – and we will be happy to help! Alternatively, if you are an IMG who wants to relocate to the UK and work for the NHS then send your CV to apply@bdiresourcing.com and one of our Specialist Advisers will be able to provide you with tailored advice.

Interview Tips

By Gabrielle Richardson
April 24, 2018

Although being offered an interview at a hospital is excellent news and you are that one step closer to getting your dream job in the NHS – the most important stage is the interview. Interviews are your way of impressing your experiences and personality upon an unknown entity. If you are fully prepared for an interview, no matter what position or hospital, it will be paramount to your success. So in this series, we are going to provide you with useful interview tips to help you secure the job. These tips will be posted once a week so make sure you stay tuned! If you are an IMG interested in relocating to the UK and working for the NHS then send your CV to apply@bdiresourcing.com - and we will be happy to guide you through the process

CV Tips

By Gabrielle Richardson
April 18, 2018

A CV stands for curriculum vitae and it is a personal marketing document used to sell yourself to prospective employers. Your CV should include your professional history, your skills, abilities, and achievements. When you are searching for a job, your CV is paramount. If you get it right, your chances of an interview offer will increase. Every individual has stronger qualities than others, and therefore every CV will be different, but you need to ensure that you highlight why your skill set makes you the best candidate for the position. Therefore, in this blog article, we have compiled a list of CV tips which will help improve your chances of being offered an interview with the NHS. How should I structure my CV? A CV can be needed at any point of your medical career, and especially at the point of your decision to relocate to the UK and work for the NHS. Your CV is essentially a personal record of all your qualifications, achievements, skills and relevant experience being a doctor. You should view your CV as an opportunity to sell your skills and experiences. The GMC strongly advise that you write a CV specifically for your registration application. Details of what to include in your CV and its construction are listed below: Personal Information and Contact Details: Your name on your CV must match your name on your proof of identity Registrations: Provide your GMC reference number and the details of any other medical regulators you are registered with Memberships: List your professional body membership Qualifications: List your qualifications in reverse-chronological order Employment History: List your employment history in reverse-chronological order. Information to include: post title, start-end date, institution name and location, the name of your supervisor, provide a brief description on your current role – it should cover your duties and responsibilities indicating your level of supervision. Lastly, in this section include details of gaps of employment. Again, you should list them in reverse-chronological order. Any gaps which are longer than 28 days should be explained and accounted for Awards: List any awards you have received Research: List any research placements you have undertook Publications: List any publications Continuing Professional Development (CPD): List your CPD activity within the last five years Conferences/Courses: Give details of relevant/important conferences or courses you have attended Teaching and Training Experience: Provide a brief description of your teaching and training activities Management Experience: Provide a brief description of your management history. Procedures: Give a list of all procedures you have performed Other details to include in a CV not being sent to the GMC: Interests and Hobbies: Here you could focus on any College Memberships or positions of responsibility References: Typically, people provide two references. Make sure your references have positions of responsibility, state their position and offer their contact details. CV Format Do’s and Don’ts: Do’s   Choose a professional font to ensure legibility for prospective employers. Present each section in a clear logical order. Use clear section headings (i.e. Education and Employment History) and remember to order your history in reverse-chronological order to keep your CV legible and clear. Power Words – These are also known as action words. This includes: responsible for, co-ordinated, supervised, influenced, designed etc. Explain gaps in employment – You should explain all employment gaps that are over four weeks long. Don’ts Length - A medical CV is heavily focused on your experience and so detail is fundamental. Therefore, do not worry too much about the length of your CV. Personal Data – Do not include the following information: age, date of birth, ethnic identity, religious preference, marital status and sexual orientation. Experiment with font – You might think that decreasing your font size is a good way to fit a large amount into a smaller space, this could lead to your CV being illegible and not being read by prospective employers. Irrelevant information – When writing your CV ask yourself the question ‘Will it help me get the job?’ If the answer is no, do not put it in your CV. For instance, in the ‘Hobbies and Interests’ section do not put any hobbies unless it is relevant to your job application. If you are an IMG who wants to relocate to the UK and work for the NHS then get in contact with one of our Specialist Advisors by sending your CV to apply@bdiresourcing.com 

Interviews with the NHS

By Gabrielle Richardson
March 28, 2018

Getting invited to an interview with an NHS hospital means that you have passed the first hurdle – your CV demonstrated the right skills and experience and you have made a good impression. But now you must prepare for the interview. In this blog post we provide you with advice on interview preparation, the structure of an NHS interview and what to expect when you receive an offer letter. Typically, the NHS prefer to interview IMG candidates via Skype as often during the interview process they are located across the world and cannot get to the UK easily. Although preparation is fundamental to succeeding in an interview, you will still feel nervous during the interview. But try to remain calm, confident, interested and remember to smile! Interview Preparation Although this is an obvious point, it is fundamental for you to thoroughly prepare for the day. Below is advice on the top six ways to meticulously prepare for an interview with the NHS. Understand the Job/Person Specification – It is important that you know the details of the job and person specification in detail. This way when you are asked about key competencies and clinical skills required you will not be left unsure. In addition, you can use your experience to demonstrate your fit for the role against the specification. Research – Carry out some research on the recruiting hospital and the department you are interviewing with. What is the hospitals CQC rating? What is their reputation? Are they facing any issues? Knowledge of the Interviewer – Find out about your interviewers academic/professional background and training. These details can be found on LinkedIn or on Google. Knowledge of these details will impress your prospective employer. Review your CV – Examine your CV to ensure that you are aware of all your stated skills, experience and achievements stated – as you will be questioned on these. Practice Frequently Asked Interview Questions – Use our list of frequently asked NHS interview questions below and practice your answers. Ask a friend or family member to help you as this will give you a feeling of preparation when asked in the interview itself. Prepare Questions to ask the Panel – It is advantageous for you to ask questions in the interview because it will appear you are interested and attracted to the position in question. Be careful not to ask for information that has already been provided to you or already discussed during the interview. First Impressions First impressions are the most lasting and the first thirty seconds of an interview are arguably the most important. So, the following tips will help you leave a positive impression on your prospective employer: Dress for Success – If your interview is via Skype and you are at home this does not mean that you should not dress professionally. Most hiring managers will form a prompt opinion based on your appearance (clothing) and how you carry yourself. Also, be aware of your body language as it can be difficult to keep focus in a Skype interview. Remember not to cross your arms and always give eye contact. Punctual – Prior to your Skype interview, ensure you have access to a computer and are logged in ready to connect with the hospital plenty of time before your interview slot. Not being online during your given slot will appear as disorganised and suggests a lack of respect for others. This could then reflect on your approach to the job itself and potentially jeopardise your chances of being offered the position. To avoid being late set an alarm, test your computer and internet connectivity the night before and find a quiet space to speak with a plain background. Positive Attitude – Your approach and outlook to the interview will portray your attitude to how you will conduct your job. If you are polite, inquisitive and display enthusiasm this will be appreciated by the recruiters as it will demonstrate your desire to help and care rather than an uninterested and apathetic individual. Question Structure of the Interview Yourself –What qualities do you possess that make you suitable for this post? How do you manage stress? How would you know you are making progress in your training? Specialty – What factors influenced you to choose this area? What is the most interesting advance in this field? What do you enjoy most about this specialty? Maintaining Good Medical Practice – How do you maintain your practice? How will you know if your clinical practice is up to date? Are there any areas you need to develop further? Teaching and Training – Have you had any experience in training or teaching? How is teaching best done? Management – Do you have any management experience? How did you deal with people defying instructions? Clinical Scenario – The interviewer will prevent you with a patient-doctor scenario, they will give details on symptoms then ask you your diagnosis and action plan. For more senior Doctors this will be specialty specific but junior level Doctors may be given more general scenario. Suggested Questions to ask in the Interview What are the opportunities for career progression? Can you give detail about the training opportunities? What are my precise responsibilities? What challenges will I face in the first six months? After your interview Whether you are successful or not, you should always ask your agent to ask your prospective employer for feedback so you can learn from the interview experience and improve for the future. Offer Letters If you are offered the position first you will receive a verbal offer and then a written conditional offer will follow which will be dependent on satisfactory completion of pre-employment checks. After you have received the offer letter you will then be asked to sign and send back the offer letter along with other requested documentation received in the letter pack. After you have passed the pre-employment check you will then receive an unconditional offer letter along with your contract of employment. What information is checked in my pre-employment check? Identification Documents – The hospital will ask you to provide proof that you are eligible to work in the UK. For example, your Visa or immigration documents. References – References will be requested from you which will need to cover a minimum of three years from your current and previous employer/s. Professional Registration and Qualifications – As your role will require GMC Registration, the hospital will carry out a check with them and secure confirmation of the appropriate registration. Where a GMC Registration check has been confirmed you will not be required to verify your qualifications separately. However, all qualifications which are not associated with the GMC will be requested separately. Criminal Record and Barring Checks – Employers are required to check whether you have a criminal record, however, your offer of employment will be subject to a satisfactory disclosure from the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS Check). Before completing the criminal conviction questions ensure to read the guidance for the filtering of convictions and cautions which can be found here. Similarly, if you have a criminal record and are unsure what might be revealed about you if you follow the previous link it will provide you with guidance and clarity. Salary and Uplifts Salaries and uplifts will be dependent on experience and we will work on your behalf to negotiate the best salary for you. UK Income Tax When you move to the UK and receive your pay from the hospital you will have to pay Income Tax. Everyone in the UK has something called a Personal Allowance, and this is the amount of money you can earn each tax year before you pay your Income Tax. The tax year runs from 6th April to 5th April and from April 2018 the standard personal allowance will increase to £11,850. If you earn less than this amount in a year, you will not have to pay Income Tax. Income Tax is collected by Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs on behalf of the government. The money from the tax is used to help provide funding for UK public services such as the NHS, schools, the welfare system and housing. Everyone pays a different amount of Income Tax to make paying tax as fair as possible, so that those who earn the most contribute more. Income Tax is made up of different bands meaning that as your income increases, so does the amount of tax you pay. The below table shows the rate of Income Tax you pay anything over your Personal Allowance. Taxable Income Rate of Tax £0 - £11,000 0% £11,001 - £43,000 20% (basic rate) £43,001 - £150,000 40% (higher rate) Over £150k 45% (additional rate) In addition to Income Tax you will also be responsible to contribute to National Insurance. These payments will go towards state benefits and services, such as the State Pension, NHS, unemployment benefits, sickness and disability allowances, maternity allowances. You will begin paying National Insurance once you earn more than £157 a week and the rate you pay depends on how much you earn. 12% of your weekly earnings between £157 and £866 2% of your weekly earnings above £866 Your National Insurance contributions will be taken off with your Income Tax before your employer pays your wages. If you are an IMG who is looking to relocate to the UK and wants guidance on your PLAB, GMC Registration or help applying for jobs send your CV to apply@bdiresourcing.com and one of our Specialist team will be happy to assist you.

Applying for jobs in the UK

By Gabrielle Richardson
March 26, 2018

Applying for jobs in the UK The NHS is one of the largest employers in the UK and Europe, employing over one million people and five per cent of the UK’s employed population. The NHS is a diverse workforce and they frequently look beyond the UK and Europe to find the best talent – with 9% of NHS Doctors from the EEA and 16% from the rest of the world. Why should I use an agency to help find my job? GMC Experience: GMC Registration tends to be the most difficult stage of any Doctors’ relocation to the UK. Due to our wealth of experience with guiding Doctors through the process it has become second nature to us. If you need with your IELTS preparations then we can put you in touch with a professional tutor. Or if you need advice on how to apply for a UK Visa we will be on hand to advise you. Relationships with Hospitals: When it comes to making applications, we will speak directly to Lead Consultants, Clinical Directors and Departmental Managers on your behalf, ensuring that your CV is reviewed directly by a clinician. Direct applications are often disregarded by an administrator before they reach departmental review, particularly where job adverts refer to previous NHS experience being required. Our network of NHS clients enables us to get your CV in front of more potential employers than anyone else. Furthermore, rather than filling in numerous lengthy applications we will speak directly with our vast network of clients to explain your situation. Our in-depth knowledge of our roles means that we won’t waste your time with vacancies that aren’t going to suit you in the long run. Exclusive Jobs: Many of the roles that we recruit to won’t be found anywhere else and aren’t being advertised right now. It might surprise you to learn that there are so many posts within the NHS that are currently filled with agency locums or aren’t being advertised currently because the department have exhausted several adverts in the past and decided they can’t fill their post. This is often where international candidates can excel the most and where an agency will be able to help you find posts that are less competitive. Understanding and Experience: The team at BDI Resourcing have years of experience and understanding of the NHS and each individual specialty. We want to know what your research interests and sub-specialties are in order to locate the perfect role for you to continue your professional development. There are huge differences in terminology and methodology for international departments when compared with the NHS. Our understanding ensures that you have the best chance of securing the right post. Salary Negotiation: The NHS has a fairly rigid salary structure so it may surprise you to learn that there can be areas to negotiate in order to secure you the best possible package. In particular, relocation packages are an excellent way to take reduce some of the hassle of your international move. We’ve been able to secure some excellent offerings including flights, luggage shipping, airport transfers, visa costs covered and even GMC registration covered for the first year. Whatever your situation, we’ll work hard to ensure that you get the most from your post. How should I structure my CV? A CV can be needed at any point of your medical career, and especially at the point of your decision to relocate to the UK and work for the NHS. Your CV is essentially a personal record of all your qualifications, achievements, skills and relevant experience being a doctor. You should view your CV as an opportunity to sell your skills and experiences. The GMC strongly advise that you write a CV specifically for your registration application. Details of what to include in your CV and its construction are listed below: Personal Information and Contact Details: Your name on your CV must match your name on your proof of identity Registrations: Provide your GMC reference number and the details of any other medical regulators you are registered with Memberships: List your professional body membership Qualifications: List your qualifications in reverse-chronological order Employment History: List your employment history in reverse-chronological order. Information to include: post title, start-end date, institution name and location, the name of your supervisor, provide a brief description on your current role – it should cover your duties and responsibilities indicating your level of supervision. Lastly, in this section include details of gaps of employment. Again, you should list them in reverse-chronological order. Any gaps which are longer than 28 days should be explained and accounted for Awards: List any awards you have received Research: List any research placements you have undertook Publications: List any publications Continuing Professional Development (CPD): List your CPD activity within the last five years Conferences/Courses: Give details of relevant/important conferences or courses you have attended Teaching and Training Experience: Provide a brief description of your teaching and training activities Management Experience: Provide a brief description of your management history. Procedures: Give a list of all procedures you have performed Other details to include in a CV not being sent to the GMC: Interests and Hobbies: Here you could focus on any College Memberships or positions of responsibility References: Typically, people provide two references. Make sure your references have positions of responsibility, state their position and offer their contact details. CV Format Do’s and Don’ts: Do’s Choose a professional font to ensure legibility for prospective employers. Present each section in a clear logical order. Use clear section headings (i.e. Education and Employment History) and remember to order your history in reverse-chronological order to keep your CV legible and clear. Power Words – These are also known as action words. This includes: responsible for, co-ordinated, supervised, influenced, designed etc. Explain gaps in employment – You should explain all employment gaps that are over four weeks long. Don’ts Length - A medical CV is heavily focused on your experience and so detail is fundamental. Therefore, do not worry too much about the length of your CV. Personal Data – Do not include the following information: age, date of birth, ethnic identity, religious preference, marital status and sexual orientation. Experiment with font – You might think that decreasing your font size is a good way to fit a large amount into a smaller space, this could lead to your CV being illegible and not being read by prospective employers. Irrelevant information – When writing your CV ask yourself the question ‘Will it help me get the job?’ If the answer is no, do not put it in your CV. For instance, in the ‘Hobbies and Interests’ section do not put any hobbies unless it is relevant to your job application. Different types of hospitals – Teaching Hospital v District General Hospital There are no official definitions for either hospital. However, previously a teaching hospital was mostly understood as a secondary care institution in a major city that is joined with a medical school with a large reputation for research. Whereas a district general hospital, although a major provider of secondary care in a local area, was not affiliated with a medical school. Though this distinction has recently been blurred as district general hospitals have now become part of medical schools – meaning there is no distinction between the two. Please note that there is no difference in terms of training between each type of hospital. When a trust offers you a position there will always be an opportunity for training and development within the position. If you have decided that you are going to relocate to the UK and work for the NHS and are in the process of finding a job – send your CV to apply@bdiresourcing.com. We will help you decide on the right location and find you the perfect job. Come and say hello! Join our Facebook group IMG Advisor -  here you will have access to frequent blog articles on relocation, the opportunity to ask questions and to meet other IMGs!

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