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How to get a Tier 2 Visa Extension

By Gabrielle Richardson
May 07, 2019

How to get a Tier 2 Extension To extend your stay in the UK under a Tier 2 visa, you will need your Certificate of Sponsorship (CoS) which should have been issued to you by the HR Department. Once your new Tier 2 CoS has been issued, you must apply for an extension of your leave to remain (which is essentially your visa application). Please note, you will have three months after the date the CoS was issued to use it, or before your existing visa expires – whichever is sooner. As you already possess all the required documentation for your first Tier 2 visa, the process will feel fairly straight-forward and simple. Click here to apply for a Tier 2 visa extension. What documents do I need to apply for a Tier 2 visa extension? Certificate of Sponsorship (CoS) Current visa or leave to remain/your Biometric Residence National Insurance Number Passport information Do I need to provide any other evidence? A licensed sponsor who will employ you in the UK To provide that you have enough money to pay for your stay in the UK (Over £945 in the bank for over three months, more information on this can be found here) Will I need to evidence my English language skills again? No, after you have passed IELTS UKVI or obtained UKNARIC – you will NOT need to resit the exam or apply for UKNARIC again. Will I incur any additional fees? Biometric Information As part of your Tier 2 visa application, you must provide your information – either your fingerprints or a photograph.  If you chose a standard or priority service, you will be required to pay an additional fee of £19.20 per applicant when you have your biometrics taken. However, if you choose the premium service you will have your biometrics taken at your appointment at no extra cost. Healthcare Surcharge Please click here to calculate how much your Surcharge will cost. What about my dependents? You must include any dependents who are on your current Tier 2 visa on your application to extend. This includes any children who have turned 18 during your time in the UK. However, they will also need to submit a separate application. How long can I stay in the UK for? You can apply to extend your visa for up to another 5 years, if your total stay is not more than 6 years. Securing an NHS Post If you are an international doctor who needs help securing an NHS post, email your CV to [email protected] and one of our Specialist Advisors will be in touch. Join our Facebook Community Are you a member of IMG Advisor? We post regular relocation blog posts, you can ask questions and receive professional guidance and the chance to meet other IMGs! References GOV.UK. (2019). General work visa (Tier 2). ] Available at: https://www.gov.uk/tier-2-general/extend-your-visa [Accessed 7 May 2019].    

A snapshot of... Nottingham

By Gabrielle Richardson
May 03, 2019

Nottingham is home of the legend Robin Hood, who stole from the rich and gave to the poor and the city is an ancient centre of lace making. As the most populated city in the county, Nottingham is of vital importance to its wider borough and the rest of Nottinghamshire. There an average of 303,000 residents living in the city itself but that number rises to around 729,000 when you can consider the entire county. Nottingham has become a popular location for expatriates, with an estimated 93 nationalities calling Nottingham home. Reasons to live in Nottingham 1. It is the home of English sports. The city has two football clubs, the world-famous Test match cricket ground Trent Bridge, the National Ice Centre and The National Water Sports Centre. 2. Full of history. Nottingham is home to a number of exhibition spaces, such as Nottingham Contemporary which is one of the UK’s most exciting art galleries. You can also visit Nottingham’s famous castle or take a trip to Wollatan Hall, a grand estate. 3. Access to the beautiful English countryside. Visit the county’s tranquil Sherwood Forest or explore the Peak District National Park, just an hour’s car journey away. 4. It has a tram. This award-winning transport network allows you to get from A to B in a matter of minutes 5. It is home to one of the oldest pubs in England. The Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem was founded in 1189, slaking the thirst of departing crusaders. Average living costs in Nottingham One-bedroom in City Centre £583.33 One-bedroom apartment outside of the City Centre £472.35 Three-bedroom apartment in the City Centre £1,063.64 Three-bedroom apartment outside of the City Centre £753.92 Transportation 1L of petrol £1.25 Monthly ticket public transport ticket £65 Taxi trip on a business day (5 miles) £15 Entertainment Basic dinner out for two at the neighbourhood pub £21 Two tickets to the cinema £20 Cappuccino £3.10 One month of gym membership in a business district £33 Where to live in Nottingham? If you would like to reside in urban living, then you could choose to reside in a stylish apartment in the former lace warehouses and in the updated Lace Market area. Alternatively, you could live in a Victorian property which has also been converted into apartments found in the park. If you prefer a quieter, more countryside living you could look at areas in Edwalton And West Bridgford suburbs. Travelling to other UK cities from Nottingham via Train London St. Pancras – 1 hour 54 minutes Birmingham – 1 hour 8 minutes Manchester – 1 hour 50 minutes Bristol – 2 hours 46 minutes Cardiff – 3 hours 21 minutes Leeds – 1 hour 44 minutes Edinburgh – 4 hours 51 minutes Where is Nottingham’s nearest airport? The nearest airport to Nottingham is the East Midlands Airport, located just half an hour away from the city centre. You can fly to a wide array of European countries including Germany, Spain, France, Turkey, Greece and Croatia. The next largest airport is Birmingham. You can fly to more than double the number of locations from this airport compared to East Midlands Airport. Education in Nottingham The city is home to two large universities and the University of Nottingham. The student popular is on average 60,000. To consider primary and secondary education, there are a wide range of excellent quality schools available in all areas. A noteworthy option is the independent day school Nottingham High School, which was included in the Telegraph’s list of top best value private schools. Top things to do in Nottingham 1. Visit Old Market Square – Nottingham has the largest remaining market square in the UK, almost 5.5 acres in size and it one of the main landmarks. 2. Explore the City’s Caves – Before the city was founded, the Celtic name for Nottingham translated to “Place of Caves”. At the top level of the Broadmarsh Shopping Centre you can embark on an underground journey through more than a thousand years of history. The caves were used for homes for the poor and in later years they were used as an air raid shelter during the Nottingham Blitz. 3. Visit Highfields Park – The park can be found South of the University of Nottingham and it is a 121-acre green space. The park is home to a boating lake and views across the University’s Trent Building and the lake itself has an island that you can reach along stepping stones. You will also see two stone lions that were presented to the University by the city of Ninbo, China. Relocating to Nottingham If you are an IMG who needs support in relocating to Nottingham or another area of the UK and securing your first NHS post, send your CV to [email protected] and we look forward to helping you. Are you a member of IMG Advisor? By joining, you will gain access to frequent relocation blog posts, the opportunity to ask questions and receive professional support and the chance to meet some other IMGs! References Expatistan, cost of living comparisons. (2019). Cost of Living in Nottingham, United Kingdom. May 2019 prices in Nottingham.. [online] Available at: https://www.expatistan.com/cost-of-living/nottingham [Accessed 2 May 2019]. Numbeo.com. (2019). Cost of Living in Nottingham. [online] Available at: https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/in/Nottingham [Accessed 2 May 2019]. Ntu.ac.uk. (2019). Top ten reasons to love Nottingham | Nottingham Trent University. [online] Available at: https://www.ntu.ac.uk/life-at-ntu/nottingham/top-ten-reasons-to-love-nottingham [Accessed 2 May 2019]. Zoopla.co.uk. (2019). Moving to Nottinghamshire - Zoopla. [online] Available at: https://www.zoopla.co.uk/discover/buying-area-guides/living-in-nottinghamshire/#DDdJg7PdYqauBvwl.97 [Accessed 2 May 2019]. MoveHub. (2019). Move to Nottingham | MoveHub. [online] Available at: https://www.movehub.com/uk/moving/nottingham/ [Accessed 2 May 2019]. The Crazy Tourist. (2019). 15 Best Things to Do in Nottingham (Nottinghamshire, England) - The Crazy Tourist. [online] Available at: https://www.thecrazytourist.com/15-best-things-to-do-in-nottingham-nottinghamshire-england/ [Accessed 3 May 2019].  

Overview of FRCOphth

By Gabrielle Richardson
May 01, 2019

If you are an international Ophthalmologist who wants to work in the UK above ST3+ level, you have three postgraduate qualifications available to you: 1. FRCOphth 2. MRCS 3. FRCS Please note, the award of FRCOphth does not allow for direct entry onto the GMC Register. As an international doctor, if you want to be on the register you must either hold an acceptable postgradudate qualification or sit the PLAB exams along with FRCOphth. You will also need to evidence your English language skills via IELTS or OET. In this post, we provide an overview of FRCOphth. We cover exam costs, formats, modules tested and list some excellent revision resources. Where can I sit FRCOphth? London Glasgow Sheffield Cairo Chennai Dubai Kuala Lumpur There are three exam elements to the FRCOphth qualification. Part 1 Fellowship Examination - £575 The Royal College states that you do not need any previous experience in Ophthalmology to apply for the exam. There are three sittings per year which are typically in January/May and October. Please note, you will be permitted a maximum of six attempts in which to pass the Part 1 FRCOpth examination.             Exam Format This examination comprises of two theoretical papers A three-hour Multiple-Choice-Question paper of 120 questions, consisting of one best answer out of four options A two-hour Constructed Response Question (CRQ) paper, consisting of 12 questions Part 2 Fellowship Written Examination - £420 To sit FRCPOphth Part 2 Written examination, you will need to have passed Part 1 FRCOphth and there are two sittings held a year. Typically in the months of June and November. You will be permitted a maximum of four attempts with this exam.             Exam Format The examination comprises of two question papers, each with 90 questions – a total of 180 multiple choice questions. You will have two hours to answer each paper. Part 2 Fellowship Oral Examination - £660 (UK) £2050 (Singapore) To obtain the final element of FRCOphth, you would need to pass the Part 2 element. There are three sittings held a year. The UK sittings are usually held in April and November and then there is one sitting in Singapore each year. You will be permitted a maximum of four attempts for this exam.             Exam Format Structured Viva – usually held over the course of two days This part of the exam consists of a series of five stations, with ten minutes per station. You will be permitted with a maximum of four attempts. The stations are: Station 1: Patient investigations and data interpretation Station 2: Patient management 1 Station 3: Patient management 2 Station 4: Attitudes, ethics and responsibilities Station 5: Audit, research and evidenced-based practice and health promotion and disease prevention Station 6: Communication – Part of the OSCE but will be held with the Vivas, 10 minutes in duration There will be two examiners present at each station. The communication station is in an OSCE format and there will be a patient actor, you will be given five minutes to read the scenario before answering questions. OSCE – usually held over the course of three days There will be five stations and three patients at each station, with 20 minutes per station. Station 1: Anterior Segment Station 2: Glaucoma and lid Station 3: Posterior Segment Station 4: Strabismus and Orbit Station 5: Neuro-Ophthalmology The Royal College stipulates that equipment will be provided in all stations but they recommend for you to bring your own equipment if you would feel more confident e.g. direct ophthalmoscope, lens, red hat pin etc. You will be asked to discuss your findings and management plan with each patient. What is included in the FRCOphth curriculum? Anatomy, Physiology, Ocular Physiology, Physiology of vision, Biochemistry and cell biology, Pathology, Immunology, Growth and Senescence, Optics, Therapeutics, Lasers, Epidemiology and Evidence-based Medicine, Instrument technology, Biostatics, Clinical Genetics, Patient Investigation, Orthoptic Assessment, Assessment of Corneal Shape, Structure and Thickness, Assessment of Corneal Shape, Structure and Thickness, Retinal and Optic Nerve Imagine, Ocular Angiography, Ultrasonography, Radiology and other neuro-imaging, Ocular and Neuro-Physiology, Biochemistry, Haematology, Pathology, Microbiology, Biometry, Allergy Testing, Urinalysis and Bone Scans. Please note, the above list is not exhaustive. Please click here for more information. Revision Resources Online EyeQ Ophthalmology Revision Success in FRCOphth Eye Docs Sample Exam Questions Part 1 Multiple-Choice-Questions OrthoQuestions Books Basic Sciences in Ophthalmology. Ferris J. John Wiley & Sons Clinical Anatomy of the Eye. Snell RS, Lemp MA The Eye: Basic Sciences and Practice. Forrester JV, Dick AD Clinical optics. Elkington Ar. Frank HJ and Greanet MJ Are you a member of our Facebook Group? By joining IMG Advisor, you will have access to frequent relocation blog posts, the opportunity to ask questions and receive professional guidance and the chance to meet other IMGs. Do you need help securing an NHS post? Send your CV to [email protected] and we will be happy to support you through the relocation process and help you secure an NHS post. References The Royal College of Ophthalmologists. (2019). Examinations - The Royal College of Ophthalmologists. [online] Available at: https://www.rcophth.ac.uk/examinations/ [Accessed 24 Apr. 2019]. The Royal College of Ophthalmologists. (2019). Part 1 FRCOphth Candidate tips - The Royal College of Ophthalmologists. [online] Available at: https://www.rcophth.ac.uk/examinations/candidate-tips/part-1-frcophth-tips/ [Accessed 24 Apr. 2019]. The Royal College of Ophthalmologists. (2019). Part 2 FRCOphth Written candidate tips - The Royal College of Ophthalmologists. [online] Available at: https://www.rcophth.ac.uk/examinations/candidate-tips/part-2-frcophth-written-tips/ [Accessed 24 Apr. 2019]. The Royal College of Ophthalmologists. (2019). Part 2 FRCOphth Oral candidate tips - The Royal College of Ophthalmologists. [online] Available at: https://www.rcophth.ac.uk/examinations/candidate-tips/part-2-frcophth-oral-tips/ [Accessed 24 Apr. 2019].  

NHS Service Post v NHS Training Post

By Gabrielle Richardson
April 24, 2019

The UK’s National Health Service (NHS) is one of the largest employers in the world and it is the biggest employer in Europe, with over 1.3 million staff. A typical day for the NHS includes: Over 835,000 people visiting their GP practice or practice nurse Almost 50,000 people visiting accident and emergency departments 49,000 outpatient consultations 94,000 people admitted to hospital as an emergency admission 36,000 people in hospital for planned treatment No matter what area of the NHS you join, you will become part of a talented, passionate team of individuals who are committed to providing extraordinary care and treatment to UK patients. With the NHS being such a busy institution and with over 10,000 vacancies at this present time – it is important for the NHS to possesses both Service Doctors and Training Doctors but we often get asked what the difference is… An NHS Service Post An NHS service post (also known as a non-training post) is designed to fill gaps in the department’s rota of training doctors. So, in order to ensure that NHS patients receive continuity of care and excellent quality of care, service posts exist. The job role of a service doctor is essentially the same as a doctor in training, except the post is not recognised by an NHS Deanery and it is not designed to provide official educational support. That being said, some hospitals do provide international doctors with CESR support to help them get onto the Specialist Register (get in contact with us today to find out which hospitals – [email protected]). What is an NHS Deanery? An NHS Deanery is a regional organisation who is responsible for postgraduate medical training, within the NHS. Each NHS Deanery is advised by a Specialty Training Committee (STC), which includes a number of Consultants who provide their expert opinion. The recruitment of doctors into Specialty Training Programmes are managed by Deaneries. Once you have accepted a training post the Deanery will then allocate specific jobs, arrange educational supervision and provide the assessment of whether you have demonstrated sufficient progress within your training. What is an NHS Training Post? If you have secured an NHS training post, your relevant Deanery will provide you with a set curriculum that you will need to follow with regards to updating your e-portfolio, signing off competencies and attending teaching sessions. You will be allocated an Educational and Clinical Supervisor to provide you with support. Within a training post, you will be allocated study leave to allow you to study for your postgraduate qualification exams. As an international doctor – can I apply for a Specialty Training Post? It is important to note that NHS training posts are given first refusal to UK/EU citizens and to those already working within the NHS. So, to successfully obtain an NHS training post, we always advise the following: Obtain a service post for a year or two years, acclimatise yourself with the system and then you will be both physically and mentally prepared and eligible to apply for a training post. Good luck! Securing an NHS Service Post If you are an international doctor who has plans to relocate to the UK and join the NHS – email your CV to [email protected] and we will be happy to support you through the entire process. From your GMC Registration, assistance securing a post, relocation logistics to finding schools for your children. Are you a member of IMG Advisor? Here, you will find access to frequent relocation blog posts, the opportunity to receive professional guidance on relocating to the UK and the chance to meet other IMGs! References Jobs.nhs.uk. (2019). NHS Jobs - Working in the NHS. [online] Available at: https://www.jobs.nhs.uk/about_nhs.html [Accessed 24 Apr. 2019]. BMJ.com (2004). The BMJ – What is the difference between a LAT post and a LAS post? [online] Available at: https://www.bmj.com/content/329/7479/s236.1  

A snapshot of... Inverness

By Gabrielle Richardson
April 23, 2019

Inverness is located in Scotland and it is the most northern city in the UK, known as the capital of the Highlands. Relocating to this fantastic city will offer you access to outstanding natural beauty and city life. In 2014, Inverness was evidenced to be the happiest place to live in Scotland and the second happiest to live in the entire UK. With easy access to glens, lochs, mountains and beaches – you can combine living in a major city with great outdoors. Top reasons to live in Inverness Affordable house prices Compact city centre oozing with history Excellent travel connections Access to picturesque landscapes Voted the happiest place to live in Scotland and the second happiest in the whole of the UK Home to the Loch Ness Monster or “Nessie” – a creature with a long neck and humps said to inhabit Loch Ness. Average Living Costs Housing One-bedroom apartment in the City Centre £530 One-bedroom apartment outside of the City Centre £483.33 Three-bedroom apartment in the City Centre £825 Three-bedroom apartment outside of the City Centre £716.67 Transportation One-way public transport ticket £2 Monthly public transport ticket £45 1L of Petrol £1.25 Taxi trip on a business day, basic tariff, 5 miles £10 Entertainment Basic dinner out for two in the neighbourhood pub £39 Two tickets to the movies £20 Two tickets to the theatre (best available seats) £106 Cappuccino £2.99 Pint of beer £3.73 One month gym membership in a business district £34 Transport links from Inverness Living in Inverness and the surrounding areas gives you access to rail, road and air links – making it extremely easy to get around. By Air: Inverness Airport provides you with regular scheduled flights to London (Gatwick, Heathrow and Luton), Bristol, Birmingham, Manchester, Belfast City, Dublin, Amsterdam, Geneva and other areas of Scotland. By Rail: Scotrail provides you with easy transport from Inverness Railway Station to Edinburgh, Glasgow and London, including other surrounding towns such as Aviemore, Perth, Nairn and Elgin. Things to do in Inverness and Surrounding Areas Shopping: Eastgate shopping centre is the place to go for all your shopping needs. It hosts a number of popular high street shops. The Old Town allows you to shop at beautiful boutique stores and the Old Victorian Market gives you access to traditional sellers. Head to Castle Street or Bank Street for shops selling art, ceramics and designer jewellery. Food and drink: To try quality Scottish produce, head to Rocpool Reserve Hotel & Chez Roux Restaurant. It’s located on the bank of the river and serves Highland beef, Black Isle pork and mussels from the Shetland Isles. For rustic comfort, but contemporary dining, try The Mustard Seed. The restaurant is set in a former church and boasts an open fire and a double-height ceiling. Its terrace on the top floor has fine views over the river and city. Living in Scotland means you need to sample some of the whiskies on offer. Take a tour of the Tomatin Distillery, which is just 16 miles south of Inverness. Find out how they produce their whiskies and sample a few in a tutored tasting. Relocating to Inverness If you are an IMG who needs support in relocating to Inverness or another area of the UK and securing your first NHS post, send your CV to [email protected] and we look forward to supporting you. Are you a member of IMG Advisor? By joining, you will gain access to frequent relocation blog posts, the opportunity to ask questions and receive professional support and the chance to meet some other IMGs! References Property, C. (2019). Moving to Inverness. All about the area, schools & transport.. [online] CCL Group Ltd. Available at: https://www.cclproperty.com/location-guides/scotland/highland/inverness/ [Accessed 18 Apr. 2019]. Expatistan, cost of living comparisons. (2019). Cost of Living in Inverness, United Kingdom. Apr 2019 prices in Inverness.. [online] Available at: https://www.expatistan.com/cost-of-living/inverness [Accessed 23 Apr. 2019]. Zoopla.co.uk. (2019). Moving to Inverness - Zoopla. [online] Available at: https://www.zoopla.co.uk/discover/buying-area-guides/living-in-inverness/#3qV7WF1Mhyo2aZ6c.99 [Accessed 23 Apr. 2019].  

Q&A with Dr Wael Gadalla, Senior Clinical Fellow General Medicine

By Gabrielle Richardson
April 18, 2019

Introduction 1. What is your name, speciality, grade and what hospital do you work at? Dr Wael N S Gadalla, General Medicine, SCF, Wexham Park Hospital 2. What country did you relocate from? I am Egyptian, however, I lived and worked in Oman since 8/2011. 3. Would you share with us your personal mission as a doctor? Yes, I feel doing something to humanity in practicing medicine is important. I like being a member of a health team and Interventional subspecialties of Internal Medicine makes the doctor feel his/her importance in life. 4. At what point in your career did you decide you wanted to relocate to the UK? What were your motivations for wanting to do so? I was in the same job in Oman since March 2014 without any career progression and so I decided to relocate to the UK. I obtained MRCP and OET and then I was accepted by the General Medical Council for registration, which is specific and easy to get the target from the first trial. The Relocation Process 5. How long did it take you to relocate, how difficult did you find the process and do you recommend it to other IMGs? After I arrived in the UK I decided to book a hotel for 11 days until I could find an apartment for me and my family. When I first arrived I found it difficult to understand the way the UK property market worked and how to rent a flat. I spent £9000 in total until I got my first NHS salary. 6. Is there anything you would have liked to have known before deciding to relocate? And now once you live in the UK? I would have asked the hospital for one month accommodation and I would have asked about how tenancy works in the UK. Thoughts on the UK 7. For you, what are the key benefits of living in the UK? Currently, I am doing an NHS service job and I feel like I have a good opportunity to learn and progress in my career and my kids are getting a better education. 8. How do you feel you in your chosen location within the UK?  I am currently living in central Slough area, easy access near to London.  9. How did your family settle into the UK? I moved with my wife and my 3 and 5 year old daughters. They liked it, but they cannot adjust to the cold weather yet. The NHS 10. How did you feel on your first day of working within the NHS? Your first week, month and then how do you feel now compared to when you first started? When I first started working within the NHS I was confused because no one told me about work regulations. I received a two day induction, but this did not include anything about work regulations or how to use the computer system. 11. How would you describe the support you received from your hospital after starting your new position? Some colleagues showed me how the system worked. 12. What is your opinion on the NHS? It is well organised and equipped health system, it ensures patient safety and welfare. 13. Are you going to use CESR as a pathway to become a UK Consultant? Could you please share your experiences? I am planning to work at my current job for one year, then will I will decide about the CESR pathway or ST-CESR.  14. How do you find working in the UK compared to your home country? The NHS is an organised work that follows the guidelines, Consultants take responsibilities and review every single patient that comes to the hospital. Every day I learn something new when working in the NHS. The Future 15. What are your hopes and plans for the future? Join a training program in the UK.      

Overview of Specialty Certificate Examinations | MRCP

By Gabrielle Richardson
April 16, 2019

The Royal College of Physicians launched the Specialty Certificate Examinations in 2008. An MRCP Sce is a ‘gold standard’ postgraduate qualification for Medicine doctors looking to progress in their sub-specialty. Sces are available in the following sub-specialties: Acute Medicine Dermatology Endocrinology and Diabetes Gastroenterology Geriatric Medicine Infectious Diseases Medical Oncology Nephrology Neurology Palliative Medicine Respiratory Medicine Rheumatology The purpose of the MRCP Sce is for doctors to demonstrate that they have the necessary knowledge needed to fulfill a Consultant’s role and responsibility in their chosen specialty. Examination Format The Sce is a computer-based, multiple-choice test which is divided into two papers, each paper has 100 items. You will have three hours to answer each paper. Each paper will present you with clinical scenarios with additional information such as test results, investigations, images, scans and the exam will test your medical knowledge and your competency in diagnosis, investigation, management and prognosis. You will be asked to answer from five listed options. When is the best time to sit Sce? The Royal College of Physicians advises that you should sit your Sce exam towards the end of your specialist medical training. However, there are no restrictions on when you may take your first attempt and it is also not necessary for doctors to have first obtained MRCP, but this is typically the order. To apply for your Sce, click here. What countries can I sit Sce in? Australia, Barbados, Brunei, Canada, Egypt, France, Ghana, Greece, Hong Kong, India, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kurdistan, Kuwait, Libya, Malaysia, Malta, Oman, Pakistan, Palestine, Qatar, Republic of Ireland, Republic of Ireland, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Trinidad, UAE, Uganda, USA, Zimbabwe. If you would like the Royal College of Physicians to send you further information on your Sce and tips on revision and preparation, register your details on their website here. Does having an Sce grant me GMC Registration? No. A Specialty Certificate Examination does not grant you GMC Registration. To work at ST3+ level within a Medicine sub-specialty, you will need full MRCP and a pass in IELTS or OET. What is the advantage of having an Sce? Having MRCP and Sce in most cases, will allow you to secure an NHS post within your exact specialty. In most cases, specialist medicine doctors who hold MRCP have to go into General Medicine NHS posts first and then apply to their subspecialty after they have NHS experience. Support Relocating to the UK and joining the NHS If you are an international doctor with MRCP, who needs support relocating to the UK and joining the NHS – send your CV to [email protected] and we will be in touch. Join our Facebook Group If you would like access to relocation blog posts, YouTube videos and the chance to meet other IMGs – join our Facebook Group IMG Advisor. References Mrcpuk.org. (2019). Specialty Certificate Examinations: Qualifications to broaden your horizons. [online] Available at: https://www.mrcpuk.org/sites/default/files/documents/specialty-certificate-examinations-qualifications-to-broader-your-horizons.pdf [Accessed 16 Apr. 2019].  

Overview of EDAIC

By Gabrielle Richardson
April 12, 2019

The European Diploma in Anaesthetisiology and Intensive Care (EDAIC) exam is a two-part exam covering the relevant basic sciences and clinical subjects for a Specialist Anaesthetist. By obtaining full EDAIC and a pass in IELTS/OET you will be eligible to take up an ST3+post. Please note, if you are a Specialist in Pakistan, you must have either FCPS or the MCPS to be eligible to sit the EDAIC Part 2 exam. Other diplomas in Anaesthetics issued in Pakistan can be accepted for the EDAIC Part 1 but not for the EDAIC Part 2.  Please note, holders of FCPS or MCPS are not exempt from the EDAIC Part 1. Cost of EDAIC EDAIC Part 1 - Written £292 EDAIC Part 2 – Oral £472 first attempt £292 following attempts Exam Certificate £42.99 Modules Tested The exam will test the following core competencies: Disease Management, Patient Assessment and Patients Assessment and Preparation patient care and Anaesthetic techniques Postoperative patient care and Acute Pain Management Emergency Medicine: Management of critical conditions, including trauma and initial burn management Medical and care of critically ill patients / multidisciplinary Intensive Care Medicine Practical anaesthetic procedures / Invasive and Imaging techniques / Regional blocks Quality – Management – Health Economics Anaesthesia Skills (ANTS) Professional and Ethics Education, self-directed learning and research Specific Core Competencies: Obstetric Anaesthesiology Airway Management and Surgery Thoracic and Cardiovascular Anaesthesiology   Anaesthesiology Anaesthesiology in remote locations / Ambulatory Anaesthesiology Multidisciplinary Pain Management Further information on the EDAIC exam syllabus can be found here.           EDAIC Part 1 This exam is held annually in the months of September and October. The exam comprises of two multiple-choice (MCQ) papers. Each paper has sixty questions and is of a two hour direction. The format that the paper uses is a stem with fives responses, each of which may be true or false. Examination Format Paper A: Basic Science (60 MCQ’s). This includes: Physiology (20 MCQ’s) Pharmacology (20 MCQ’s) Physics, Clinical Measurement, Statistics (20 MCQ’s) Paper B: Clinical Practice (60 MCQ’s). This includes: General Anaesthetics Special Anaesthetic techniques Local/regional anaesthetics Intensive Care Internal Medicine Emergency Medicine Please click here for a list of international test centres. EDAIC Part 2 The second exam is held annually between the months of February and November. To apply for EDAIC Part 2, you must have passed EDAIC Part 1 and be a certified Anaesthetist in any country OR are trainees in the final year of their training in Anaesthetics, in one or more of the European member states of the World Health Organisation. Examination Format The exam of each candidate is held in a single day during which there are four separate 25-minute oral examinations. The oral examination embraces the same range of basic science and clinical subjects within a clinical scenario format as is covered by the EDAIC Part 1 exam. Two of the oral examinations will concentrate on the basic sciences and two on clinical topics. In the clinical orals, x-rays and ECG’s are also used. Please click here for a list of international test centres. Revision Resources Smith and Aitkenhead’s Textbook of Anaesthesia , Intensive Care and Perioperative Medicine A-Z: An Encyclopaedia of Principles and Practice (FRCA Study Guides) 6 Edition Morgan and Mikhail’s Clinical Anaesthesiology 6 Edition Fundamentals of Anaesthesia, 4 Edition Podcasts Anaesthesia UK: Dr Podcast Practice Papers EDAIC Part 1 EDAIC Part 2 Relocation to the UK If you are an international doctor planning to relocate to the UK and join the NHS, email your CV to [email protected] and we will be happy to help you. Join our Facebook Group If you would like access to relocation blog posts, YouTube videos and the chance to meet other IMGs – join our Facebook Group IMG Advisor. References . (2019). EUROPEAN DIPLOMA IN ANAESTHESIOLOGY AND INTENSIVE CARE. ] Available at: https://www.esahq.org/education/edaic/about [Accessed 10 Apr. 2019]. . (2019). ] Available at: https://www.esahq.org/education/edaic/exam-types/part-i-examination/ [Accessed 10 Apr. 2019].    

The European Working Time Directive (EWTD)

By Gabrielle Richardson
April 10, 2019

What is the 48 Hours Working Time Directive? It is a European Union initiative to safeguard the amount of hours worked by European Union citizens. The UK adopted the Directive in 1993. If you opt into the Directive, it protects the following rights: It provides you with a maximum working week of 48 hours A rest period of 11 consecutive hours a day A 20-minute break when the day is longer than six hours A minimum of one rest day per week The statutory right to four weeks’ holiday Night working must not average out at more than eight hours at a stretch The EWTD is designed to support work-life balance in the UK, by limiting long hours, which can be both stressful and harmful to health. To highlight this, research has shown that driving whilst tired has similar results to driving after drinking alcohol. However, when the UK adopted the Directive in 1993, we also adopted an opt-out clause and exceptions to the Directive, where you may have to work more than 48 hours a week on average if you work in a job where 24-hour staffing is required, or you work within the emergency services. Please note, it is your choice on whether or not you choose to opt in or opt out of the 48 Hours Working Time Directive and you should speak to your HR department for further advice. Relocation Support If you are an international doctor who plans to relocate to the UK and join the NHS, email your CV to [email protected] and we can help you secure an NHS post and provide support through the relocation process. Join our Facebook Group We run a Facebook Group named IMG Advisor! We post three blog articles a week, one vlog and regular GMC/NHS Updates. References Pettinger, T. (2019). Working Time Directive. [online] Econ.economicshelp.org. Available at: https://econ.economicshelp.org/2007/06/working-time-directive.html [Accessed 9 Apr. 2019]. GOV.UK. (2019). Maximum weekly working hours. [online] Available at: https://www.gov.uk/maximum-weekly-working-hours [Accessed 10 Apr. 2019].  

A snapshot of... Brighton

By Gabrielle Richardson
April 08, 2019

Brighton is famous for its pebbled beach, independent shops, Regency architecture and the best bit? It is just an hour away from London! The city is located on the south coast of England, it has a population of 601, 574 people (2019) and it has been labelled the UK’s “hippest city” and the “happiest place to live in the UK”. Facts about Brighton 1. Brighton is home to Britain’s oldest cinema. 2. Brighton’s Sea Life Centre is the world’s oldest aquarium – with over 100 species, including sharks and stingrays. 3. Brighton has tunnels beneath the city – The tunnels were dug so Prince Regent could move about Brighton without people seeing how overweight he had become. 4. Brighton’s famous Royal Pavilion was used as a military hospital for Indian soldiers during World War One. 5. Brighton’s Marina is one of the largest in Europe with space for around 2000 boats. Average Cost of Living Housing One-bedroom apartment in the City Centre £953.33 One-bedroom apartment outside of the City Centre £809.25 Three-bedroom apartment in the City Centre £1,717.50 Three-bedroom apartment in the City Centre £1,375.00 Transportation 1 litre of petrol £1.24 Monthly public transport ticket £67 Taxi trip (5 miles) £17 Entertainment Basic dinner out for two in the local pub £29 Two tickets to the cinema £19 Two tickets to the theatre £106 Cappuccino £2.75 A pint of beer £4.48 Monthly gym membership £34 Travelling to other UK cities from Brighton via Train London Victoria – 55 minutes Birmingham – 2 hours 38 minutes Manchester – 3 hours 32 minutes Bristol – 3 hours 18 minutes Cardiff – 3 hours 50 minutes Leeds – 3 hours 46 minutes Edinburgh - 5 hours 49 minutes Where is Brighton’s nearest airport? The advantage of living in Brighton is that all major London airports are easily accessible. London Gatwick is only a 30-minute journey by train, just 22 miles away from the city. London Heathrow Airport is situated just 46 miles from Brighton and located west of Central London and is a 90-minute journey from Brighton. Other nearby airports include London City, London Stansted and London Luton. Schools Brighton has 11 Ofsted “Outstanding” rated schools within a 10-mile radius of the city. You can compare schools and college performance on the Government website here. The Best things to do in Brighton 1. Take a trip up the British Airways i360 – With the same designers as the London Eye, going up the i3060 will provide you with amazing views of Brighton’s skyline overlooking the iconic seafront. 2. Stroll along Brighton Palace Pier – Brighton has an 8-mile long seafront full of bars, restaurants, live music and ice cream parlours! 3. Visit the Royal Pavilion – The Palace was built in the 19th Century and has been named as one of Britain’s most spectacular buildings, built by Prince Regent, George IV. 4. Visit the famous North Laines – This area of the city is full of over 300 bespoke cafes, restaurants and boutique shops! North Laines is known as “the place where you can find anything”. Relocating to Liverpool If you are an IMG who needs support in relocating to Brighton or another area of the UK and securing your first NHS post, send your CV to [email protected] and we look forward to helping you. Are you a member of IMG Advisor? By joining, you will gain access to frequent relocation blog posts, the opportunity to ask questions and receive professional support and the chance to meet some other IMGs! References House Beautiful. (2019). This is the happiest city in the UK, according to a new study. [online] Available at: https://www.housebeautiful.com/uk/lifestyle/news/a2433/brighton-hove-happiest-city-uk/ [Accessed 8 Apr. 2019]. Dickinson, G. (2019). Is Brighton really the world's most hipster city?. [online] The Telegraph. Available at: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/comment/most-hipster-cities-brighton-city/ [Accessed 8 Apr. 2019]. Kings Education. (2019). 10 fun facts about Brighton. [online] Available at: https://www.kingseducation.com/kings-life/2016/06/28/10-fun-facts-about-brighton/ [Accessed 8 Apr. 2019]. Burt Brill & Cardens Solicitors. (2019). 10 Facts About Brighton | Burt Brill & Cardens. [online] Available at: https://www.bbc-law.co.uk/legal-news/facts-about-brighton/ [Accessed 8 Apr. 2019]. Expatistan, cost of living comparisons. (2019). Cost of Living in Brighton and Hove, United Kingdom. Apr 2019 prices in Brighton and Hove.. [online] Available at: https://www.expatistan.com/cost-of-living/brighton-and-hove [Accessed 8 Apr. 2019].  

Overview of FRCEM Intermediate: SAQ

By Gabrielle Richardson
April 04, 2019

The Royal College of Emergency Medicine offers a series of examinations which can lead to either a Fellowship or a Membership of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (FRCEM).  In today’s post, we are going to explore FRCEM Intermediate SAQ. This post will provide you with the requirements to sit the exam, its format, curriculum tested, tips on how to successfully pass and links to some excellent revision resources. How to achieve MRCEM: FRCEM Primary FRCEM Intermediate: SAQ MRCEM Final: OSCE How to achieve FRCEM: FRCEM Primary FRCEM Intermediate: SAQ and Situational Judgement FRCEM Final: Critical Appraisal, Quality Improvement Project, Clinical Short Answer Cost of FRCEM Intermediate SAQ: £305 (UK test centres) or £385 for overseas test centres 2019 Examination Timetable Date Centres Application Closing Date 17 September 2019 London, Dublin, Edinburgh, Leeds, Cardiff, Chennai, Hyderabad, New Delhi, Muscat, Kuala Lumpur 3 June 2019   FRCEM Intermediate SAQ Format The paper is in Short Answer Question (SAQ) format comprising of a three-hour paper of 60, 3-mark questions Requirements to sit FRCEM Intermediate SAQ You will be eligible to sit FRCEM Intermediate SAQ provided you have met the below requirements: Hold a medical qualification approved by the GMC for the purposes of registration Completed the UK Foundation Programme or equivalent (electronic evidence will be needed at the point of application) Have passed the MRCEM Part A examination OR the FRCEM Primary FRCEM Intermediate SAQ Curriculum Common Competences             Clinical examination, therapeutics and safe prescribing, decision making and clinical reasoning, prioritization of patient safety in clinical practice, infection control, managing long-term conditions and promoting patient self-care, health promotion and public health, principles of medical ethics and confidentiality, the legal framework for practice, evidence and guidelines Clinical Presentations             Anaphylaxis, cardio-respiratory arrest, major trauma, septic patient, shocked patient, unconscious patient, abdominal pain, acute back pain, aggressive/disturbed behaviour, blackout/collapse, breathlessness, chest pain, confusion, cough, cyanosis, , dizziness/vertigo, falls, fever, fits, haematemesis, headache, head injury, jaundice, limb pain, neck pain, patient, pain management, painful ear, poisoning, rash, red eye, mental health, wound assessment. Anaesthetic Competences               Premedical, induction of general , postoperative and recovery room care, management of respiratory and cardiac arrest, control of infection, introduction for emergency surgery, airway management, procedural sedation, transfer medicine, critical incidence Acute Presentations             Major trauma – chest injuries, abdominal trauma, spine, maxillofacial, burns, traumatic limb and joint injuries, testicular pain, urinary retention Practical Procedures             Arterial , peripheral venous cannulation, central venous cannulation, arterial blood gas sampling, lumbar puncture, tap, airway protection, basic and advanced life support, knee aspiration, temporary pacing, reduction of dislocation/fracture, large joint examination, wound management, trauma primary survey, initial assessment of the acutely unwell. Please note, this list is not exhaustive and other areas of Emergency medicine will be tested including Paediatric Emergency Medicine. Please click here for a full list. BDI Resourcing’s Top Tips approaching MRCEM 1. Use a wide range of media to support your learning. This can include books, YouTube videos, podcasts, journals, news articles. 2. Do as many practice papers as possible. This will give you a true indication of gaps in your knowledge. 3. Attend courses! By doing so you will gain invaluable knowledge and skills that will fully equip you to successfully pass your exam. Useful Revision Resources Books FRCEM Intermediate SAQ Revision Notes – Ashis Banerjee FRCEM Intermediate: Short Answer Question – Moussa Issa Online Clinical Cases – RCEM Learning Online Webinars – Bromley Emergency Courses Revision Course – FRCEM Success Courses Bromley, UK FRCEM Intermediate – Bromley Emergency Courses Practice Questions FRCEM Success Royal College of Emergency Medicine Practice Questions Support Securing an NHS Post If you are an international doctor who needs support securing your first NHS post, including IELTS exemption, please email your CV to [email protected] and we can help you. Are you a member of IMG Advisor? By joining our Facebook Group, you will have access to frequent relocation blog posts, the opportunity to ask questions and receive professional support and the chance to meet other IMGs. References Rcem.ac.uk. (2019). Regulations & Info Packs. ] Available at: https://www.rcem.ac.uk/RCEM/Exams_Training/Exams/Regulations_Info_Packs/RCEM/Exams_Training/Exams/Regulations_Info_Packs.aspx?hkey=bf869f0e-de0b-4464-b82b-77bdece214aa [Accessed 4 Apr. 2019]. . (2019). FRCEM Tips - RCEMLearning. ] Available at: https://www.rcemlearning.co.uk/foamed/frcem-tips/ [Accessed 4 Apr. 2019].    

Tax Relief for NHS Doctors

By Gabrielle Richardson
April 01, 2019

If you are employed by the NHS and pay for work expenses that are not reimbursed to you by the hospital, then you may be able to claim a tax rebate from Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs (HMRC). If you have not yet claimed for a tax rebate, you should be aware that HMRC allows you to go back four years, this means you can make a backdated claim. NB: BDI Resourcing are not financial advisers, please call HMRC on 0300 200 3300 to discuss any potential claims. What is a tax relief? Tax relief on an item means that its cost or expense can be subtracted from your gross income, in order to reduce the amount of income that is subject to tax. A tax-deductible expense must be an expense that you have incurred “wholly, exclusively and necessarily”, according to HMRC, in the performance of your duties of employment. So, essentially – an expense that you had to pay whilst doing your job and that is related only to doing your job. What expenses can I claim? HMRC a definitive list of expenses, so, it is always to seek professional advice. Generally, you can claim: 1. BMA, MDO, GMC and other professional memberships and annual subscriptions To make a claim for a professional membership, you must be involved in the practice of the profession and the membership must be a condition for practicing that profession. Please note, to make a claim for any subscriptions, these must be with an HMRC-approved body. 2. Travel Tax relief is typically available for travel; however, it must be for travel between your home and temporary workplace. A temporary workplace must not be the base from which the duties are usually performed, and work carried out. There is no tax relief for ordinary commuting to work. 3. Education The HMRC states that you may be eligible for tax relief if: you incurred a travel cost to the course, course fees and other associated costs are generally deductible if attendance at the event is an intrinsic part of the employment and one of the duties of employment. How do I claim tax relief? This can be done in a variety of ways: Complete a P87 form: tax relief for expenses of employment Complete a self-assessment tax return, if your expenses amount to more than £2,500 For exam fees, you could also write a letter to HMRC, writing that: you are employed under a training contract, you took a mandatory exam to meet the requirements of your training Remember to keep all of your receipts for any expenses you want to include in your claim. What other items can I claim tax relief for? Unfortunately, HMRC specific guidance on this, as the requirements on job descriptions differ. However, if you follow the “wholly, exclusively and necessary” rule, typical items include: Scrubs Theatre shoes Stethoscopes Any tools and specialist equipment that is specifically required, necessary and used in the performance of your work Support finding an NHS Post If you are an international doctor who needs support securing your first NHS post or if you have any relocation questions, email your CV or query to [email protected] and we will be happy to help. IMG Advisor Are you a member of our Facebook Group IMG Advisor? By joining, you will have access to frequent relocation blogs and , the opportunity to ask questions and receive professional advice and the chance to meet other IMGs! References Bma.org.uk. (2019). BMA - Tax relief. ] Available at: https://www.bma.org.uk/advice/employment/tax/tax-guidance/tax-relief [Accessed 1 Apr. 2019]. Go Self Employed. (2019). Tax Deductible Expenses for NHS Doctors & How to Claim a Rebate. ] Available at: https://goselfemployed.co/bma-tax-relief-for-doctors/ [Accessed 1 Apr. 2019].    

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